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(Psalm 20) A Battle Cry for the King

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Psalm 20 is probably related to Israel preparing for battle. This may have even included preparations in the temple. The superscription affirms it as originating at the time of David, but likely saw further use in the kings of Israel that followed. When we consider that Christ is an anointed Davidic king; this cry takes on a New Testament devotion and trust in Christ.

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INTRODUCTION:
is a unique Psalm compared to the one’s we have read so far.
is a unique Psalm compared
It is not lamenting at a struggle.
It is not a great affirmation of Wisdom.
It is not even truly directed to God.
It is a Ancient Israelite Battle song.
It was song meant to encourage the King and His Soldiers before battle.
It was song meant to encourage the King and His Soldiers before battle.
Psalm 20 ESV
To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David. 1 May the Lord answer you in the day of trouble! May the name of the God of Jacob protect you! 2 May he send you help from the sanctuary and give you support from Zion! 3 May he remember all your offerings and regard with favor your burnt sacrifices! Selah 4 May he grant you your heart’s desire and fulfill all your plans! 5 May we shout for joy over your salvation, and in the name of our God set up our banners! May the Lord fulfill all your petitions! 6 Now I know that the Lord saves his anointed; he will answer him from his holy heaven with the saving might of his right hand. 7 Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the Lord our God. 8 They collapse and fall, but we rise and stand upright. 9 O Lord, save the king! May he answer us when we call.
According to the superscription,
this is a battle song that originated with David, but was used by many kings after that.
So what does this Psalm do?
It is a battle cry.
It boasts of allegiance and confidence in the King to win the battle,
and this confidence is chiefly because of their confession of God - they trust in God to protect them.
and this confidence is chiefly because of their confession of God - they trust in God
ILLUSTRATION:
I mean,
How effective are soldiers who think they are going into a death trap with no possible victory?
NOT
This isn’t like special ops,
sacrificing for the greater army.
LIKE
This is more like going into battle,
but knowing there is no hope to protect your homeland from invasion.
Soldiers don’t give it their all if they are already know they are going to loose.
And most battles at this time were an all or nothing kind of warfare.
You either won,
or lost.
So Trust, confidence, and devotion are important for armies,
especially in a day when battles are essentially won by a slug fest.
This kind of warfare requires,
a certain amount of devotion and sacrifice to the King who strategies how to win the war.
So in many ways,
this Psalm provided a great song to unite around in battle.
But unlike most charges we see by our military leaders today,
This was a battle cry confessing their trust in God to answer the prayers of their King.
In this way it is not simply a battle song,
but also a confession.
There are several things that could be said here,
but may I highlight a few major points.
God answers prayers.
Probably the highlight of the confession is found in v. 7 and 8.
God delivers or saves his people in time of hostility.
Psalm 20:7–8 ESV
7 Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the Lord our God. 8 They collapse and fall, but we rise and stand upright.
For many of us,
this should be a familiar passage from Scripture.
The law in banned Israel from seeking chariot and horses.
condemns Hezekiah for seeking am Egyptian Alliance - Egypt being known for their military strength in Chariots.
But ,
declares both their obedience and ultimately their trust in God.
The impactful statement,
is confessed by Israel here in this song.
CONCLUSION:
PROPOSITION:
TRANSITION:
As we consider this text,
1) Point 1
may was also consider these implications to our lives.
2) Point 2
3) Point 3
First,
4) Point 4
Do we have the same confession?
5) Point 5
CONCLUSION:
That is, What is your battle cry?
When faced with a physical battle - sickness, disease, financial setbacks…
or
When faced with Spiritual battle - such as wrong fleshly desires, the unbelief and doubt that dwells in your mind, and the distractions that are found in this world.
In those battles,
do we trust in the defenses of this world -
or do we trust in God.
It is easy to look for solutions to our Physical and Spiritual battles in this world,
but we ought to look principally to God
This does not mean you live in denial,
but we should be challenged to place the trust of our hearts in God and God alone.
There is a fine line between distrust and trust, and that line is found in what captures the attention of our heart.
What captures the attention of your heart in the midst of Struggles.
That is our battle cry, that is our confession.
May it be in God.
There is a fine line between distrust and trust, and that line is found in what captures the attention of our heart.
Also,
do we make the same confession about the Davidic King that we worship?
This is a song affirming God answering the desires of the Kings heart. the granting of military victory.
But who is the ultimate Davidic king?
Who is not simply an anointed king,
but the anointed king - the promised Messiah?
We may not be Israel,
but is not our Lord and Savior that King?
Can we not also sing this song when we consider our Lord? because he is the lord’s anointed king.
The one who is intercessor,
the one who we are united with, t
he one who God sent to pay for our sins
is the final and last Davidic king.
is the final and last Davidic king.
Name what Spiritual or physical battle we may face,
And let’s sing this battle cry.
I think for a conclusion, let’s read this text again.
But this time,
let’s make this a confession and belief in Christ - our chosen King.
May we consider as we read this,
what battle the Lord may be allowing in our life tonight.
And what this confession says about our Lord and Savior’s victory over this.
Psalm 20 ESV
To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David. 1 May the Lord answer you in the day of trouble! May the name of the God of Jacob protect you! 2 May he send you help from the sanctuary and give you support from Zion! 3 May he remember all your offerings and regard with favor your burnt sacrifices! Selah 4 May he grant you your heart’s desire and fulfill all your plans! 5 May we shout for joy over your salvation, and in the name of our God set up our banners! May the Lord fulfill all your petitions! 6 Now I know that the Lord saves his anointed; he will answer him from his holy heaven with the saving might of his right hand. 7 Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the Lord our God. 8 They collapse and fall, but we rise and stand upright. 9 O Lord, save the king! May he answer us when we call.
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