Faithlife Sermons

Worship As A Weapon Pt2

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 4 views
Notes & Transcripts | Handout
Sermon Tone Analysis
A
D
F
J
S
Emotion
A
C
T
Language
O
C
E
A
E
Social
View more →
As we talked about last week, there is purpose behind everything that we do in worship.
God is restoring worship so that we (His children) can minister to Him first and foremost, but also so that we will have a weapon of warfare to use to destroy the enemy in our lives.
And, if we understand God’s purpose, then we can be part of the plan. He has a plan for worship and as we begin to understand what the purpose of that plan is we will see victories in our lives like we’ve not seen before. Because we now of a weapon that destroys the devil. And we have an understanding that we can put our faith behind.

Lifting Our Hands

Psalm 134:1–2 NLT
Oh, praise the Lord, all you servants of the Lord, you who serve at night in the house of the Lord. Lift your hands toward the sanctuary, and praise the Lord.
ps 134
Psalm 28:2 NLT
Listen to my prayer for mercy as I cry out to you for help, as I lift my hands toward your holy sanctuary.
The commentator in the Tehillim saysGod is stirred up against our enemies with shouts of praise. As He is stirred up, or arises, His enemies are dashed into pieces, and their kingdoms are broken and destroyed.
Psalm 47:1 NKJV
Oh, clap your hands, all you peoples! Shout to God with the voice of triumph!
Psalm 47:5 ESV
God has gone up with a shout, the Lord with the sound of a trumpet.
Gay, Robert (2012-05-16). Silencing the Enemy With Praise (Kindle Locations 671-672). Parsons Publishing House. Kindle Edition.
The commentator in the Tehillim saysGod is stirred up against our enemies with shouts of praise. As He is stirred up, or arises, His enemies are dashed into pieces, and their kingdoms are broken and destroyed.Notice that we are not asked to do these things, we are commanded to do this.
Notice that we are not asked to do these things, we are commanded to do this.
This psalm finds the psalmist reaching out to God like a helpless person who stretches out his hands in desperation, gesturing to others to reach out and help him.
Psalm 119:48 ESV
I will lift up my hands toward your commandments, which I love, and I will meditate on your statutes.
Notice that we are not asked to do these things, we are commanded to do this.
hT
This is just an attitude of “Father, I worship You and I’m dependent completely upon You and Your ways.
Example: someone who doesn’t enjoy what they do will struggle to lift their hands and get started, but someone who loves what they do will be eager to lift their hands and start.
This was the attitude that David had toward God and His Word. It was always easy for him to worship and stretch toward God.
Psalm 47:1 KJV 1900
O clap your hands, all ye people; Shout unto God with the voice of triumph.
Notice that we are not asked to do these things, we are commanded to do this.
Notice that we are not asked to do these things, we are commanded to do this.
We are commanded to clap and shout, but not because God is some ego maniac.
He commands us to do these things because He understands better than anyone what effect they are having in our lives.
We are commanded to clap and shout, but not because God is some ego maniac. He commands us to do these things because He understands better than anyone what effect they are having in our lives. He understands and sees what happens when we know what the Word says about clapping and shouting and put our faith behind it. Great things in the realm of the Spirit happen when you understand the purpose behind why God commands us to do these things.
He understands and sees what happens when we know what the Word says about clapping and shouting and put our faith behind it.
He knows our obedience to do what He has commanded will bring about victory in our lives.
Great things in the realm of the Spirit happen when you understand the purpose behind why God commands us to do these things.

Why We Shout

Psalm 47:5 ESV
God has gone up with a shout, the Lord with the sound of a trumpet.

The Hebrew word for “gone” means to stir up.

So, God is stirred up when we shout praise to Him.
Psalm 68:1 KJV 1900
Let God arise, let his enemies be scattered: Let them also that hate him flee before him.
The Hebrew word for “arise” also means to stir.

The Hebrew word for “scattered” to dash in pieces or break.

God is stirred up against our enemies with shouts of praise. As He is stirred up, or arises, His enemies are dashed into pieces, and their kingdoms are broken and destroyed.

Before we jump into the story of Jericho, I want us to look at what the Hebrew words for “clap” and “shout” are:
Gay, Robert (2012-05-16). Silencing the Enemy With Praise (Kindle Locations 671-672). Parsons Publishing House. Kindle Edition.

The Hebrew word for “shout” is “ruwa” which means to split the ears with sound; to mar especially by breaking.

Before we jump into the story of Jericho, I want us to look at what the Hebrew words for “clap” and “shout” are:
Before we jump into the story of Jericho, I want us to look at what the Hebrew words for “clap” and “shout” are:

The Hebrew word for “clap” is “taqa’” which means to clap; drive; thrust.

Joshua 6:1–11 NLT
Now the gates of Jericho were tightly shut because the people were afraid of the Israelites. No one was allowed to go out or in. But the Lord said to Joshua, “I have given you Jericho, its king, and all its strong warriors. You and your fighting men should march around the town once a day for six days. Seven priests will walk ahead of the Ark, each carrying a ram’s horn. On the seventh day you are to march around the town seven times, with the priests blowing the horns. When you hear the priests give one long blast on the rams’ horns, have all the people shout as loud as they can. Then the walls of the town will collapse, and the people can charge straight into the town.” So Joshua called together the priests and said, “Take up the Ark of the Lord’s Covenant, and assign seven priests to walk in front of it, each carrying a ram’s horn.” Then he gave orders to the people: “March around the town, and the armed men will lead the way in front of the Ark of the Lord.” After Joshua spoke to the people, the seven priests with the rams’ horns started marching in the presence of the Lord, blowing the horns as they marched. And the Ark of the Lord’s Covenant followed behind them. Some of the armed men marched in front of the priests with the horns and some behind the Ark, with the priests continually blowing the horns. “Do not shout; do not even talk,” Joshua commanded. “Not a single word from any of you until I tell you to shout. Then shout!” So the Ark of the Lord was carried around the town once that day, and then everyone returned to spend the night in the camp.
Joshua 6:15–21 NLT
On the seventh day the Israelites got up at dawn and marched around the town as they had done before. But this time they went around the town seven times. The seventh time around, as the priests sounded the long blast on their horns, Joshua commanded the people, “Shout! For the Lord has given you the town! Jericho and everything in it must be completely destroyed as an offering to the Lord. Only Rahab the prostitute and the others in her house will be spared, for she protected our spies. “Do not take any of the things set apart for destruction, or you yourselves will be completely destroyed, and you will bring trouble on the camp of Israel. Everything made from silver, gold, bronze, or iron is sacred to the Lord and must be brought into his treasury.” When the people heard the sound of the rams’ horns, they shouted as loud as they could. Suddenly, the walls of Jericho collapsed, and the Israelites charged straight into the town and captured it. They completely destroyed everything in it with their swords—men and women, young and old, cattle, sheep, goats, and donkeys.
josh 15

The battle plan Joshua was to use was most unusual. Ordinary weapons of war such as battering rams and scaling ladders were not to be employed. Rather Joshua and his armed men were to march around the city once a day for six successive days with seven priests blowing trumpets preceding the ark of the covenant. On the seventh day they were to circle Jericho seven times and then the wall of Jericho would collapse and the city would be taken.

What was the significance of the blaring trumpets? These instruments were “jubilee trumpets” (lit. Heb.) used in connection with Israel’s solemn feasts to proclaim the presence of God (Num. 10:10). The conquest of Jericho was not therefore exclusively a military undertaking but also a religious one, and the trumpets declared that the Lord of heaven and earth was weaving His invisible way around this doomed city

6:10–11. Preserving absolute silence (except for the seven priests blowing their trumpets) this strange parade made its way toward Jericho and then around the city like a serpent. Jericho then covered about eight or nine acres and required less than 30 minutes to march around. When the circuit was completed, to the amazement of the Canaanites who probably anticipated an immediate attack, the Israelites returned quietly to camp.

6:12–14. The same procedure was followed for six days. No fortress had ever been conquered in this fashion. This strange strategy was probably given to test the faith of Joshua. He did not question; he trusted and obeyed. This procedure was also designed to test Israel’s obedience to God’s will. And that was not easy in this case. Every day they were exposing themselves to ridicule and danger. A Jericho soldier may have looked down from the wall on the army of Israel and asked, “Do they think they can frighten us into surrender by the sound of their rams’ horns?” And the rest may have joined in a loud chorus of raucous laughter.

2 Corinthians 10:4 NLT
We use God’s mighty weapons, not worldly weapons, to knock down the strongholds of human reasoning and to destroy false arguments.
Ephesians 6:12 NLT
For we are not fighting against flesh-and-blood enemies, but against evil rulers and authorities of the unseen world, against mighty powers in this dark world, and against evil spirits in the heavenly places.
Related Media
Related Sermons