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018 Final thoughts from Paul

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018 Final thoughts from Paul

Colossians
C. PAUL’S THREE FINAL EXHORTATIONS TO ALL CHRISTIANS AT COLOSSE (4:2–6)
These three final exhortations deal with the things which are necessary if we as Christians are to have an effective gospel witness. To win the unsaved, we must pray continually for them, walk wisely before them, and speak graciously unto them.)
1. The first exhortation—Pray continually (4:2–4)
a. We are to pray continually and persistently
1). We as Christians should pray, not continuously but continually, .
2). Also, we should pray not once but persistently for that which we believe we need in order to do God’s will.
a). We should pray until our prayer is answered (; ; ; ) or until God tells us to pray no more about the matter (; ).
b. We are to pray watchfully—We are to pray watching to see that we are not praying selfishly but unselfishly for the progress of God’s kingdom work here on the earth. Also, we should pray watching that our minds do not wander as we pray.
c. We are to pray thankfully—Thanksgiving for past blessings and present blessings should ever be a part of our prayers.
d. vv.3-4 We are to pray on the behalf others
2. The second exhortation—Walk wisely (4:5)
a. We as Christians are to walk wisely before the unsaved, being careful to manifest Christ and nothing but Christ in our lives,
b. Sinners are won to Christ not through the exhibition of our lives but through the exhibition of Christ’s life.
c. We are to “redeem the time,” seize every opportunity to manifest Christ in our conduct, so as to impress the unsaved,
3. The third exhortation—Speak graciously (4:6)
3. The third exhortation—Speak graciously (4:6)
a. As Christians, our words to the unsaved should be gracious (winsome, attractive, agreeable, pleasing,
b. seasoned (“seasoned with salt,” palatable, tasty), and suitable (suited to the personality, the position, the state, and the needs of the person spoken to; suited to answering every man wisely). Foolish, jesting, thoughtless, empty, angry, blunt, cutting, and filthy words harm the Christian cause.
A. THE MISSION OF TYCH-I-CUS AND ONESIMUS AT COLOSSE (4:7–9)
Epaphras, the founder and pastor of the church at Colosse (and probably the founder and pastor of the church at Laodicea and the church at Hierapolis, 4:13) is detained in Rome (), so Paul chooses Tychicus
Tychicus, as he journeys from Rome to the churches of Asia Minor, plans to take with him Onesimus (a run-away slave converted under Paul’s ministry at Rome, who is being returned by Paul to his master, Philemon, a member of the church at Colosse). He will protect Onesimus from the slave catchers as they journey eastward.
The mission of Tychicus and Onesimus at Colosse, in addition to delivering the Colossian epistle to the Colossians, is to comfort (strengthen) the Colossians by giving them an account of Paul’s welfare at Rome. The Colossians have never seen Paul’s face, 2:1, but they are concerned with the welfare of their apostle and they will be heartened to hear of God’s care for Paul in his Roman prison (“that he might know your estate,” v. 8, should be translated “that you might know our estate”).
Note that Onesimus is to assist Tychicus in giving this report to the Colossians. Paul assumes that the Colossians will forgive Onesimus and receive him as a brother. Paul shows his approval of Onesimus by calling him “a faithful and beloved brother” and by assigning him a part in making the report to the Colossians.
B. THE SALUTATIONS FROM PAUL’S HELPERS (4:10–14)
(Six assistants of Paul (who are with him in Rome), five of them probably unknown personally by the Colossians [Epaphras is their pastor], show their concern for the spiritual welfare of the Colossians and also show their approval of Paul’s stand against the Gnostics at Colosse by sending their salutations at the close of Paul’s letter.
Paul first sends salutations from three Jewish converts to Christianity and then he sends salutations from three Gentile converts to Christianity,
1. The salutation from three Jewish converts to Christianity (4:10, 11)
10 Ar-is-tar-chus my fellow prisoner saluteth you, and Marcus, sister’s son to Barnabas, (touching whom ye received commandments: if he come unto you, receive him;)
11 And Jesus, which is called Justus, who are of the circumcision. These only are my fellowworkers unto the kingdom of God, which have been a comfort unto me.
Colossians 4:10–11 KJV 1900
Aristarchus my fellowprisoner saluteth you, and Marcus, sister’s son to Barnabas, (touching whom ye received commandments: if he come unto you, receive him;) And Jesus, which is called Justus, who are of the circumcision. These only are my fellowworkers unto the kingdom of God, which have been a comfort unto me.
Col
(All three of these men have been a great comfort to Paul during his Roman imprisonment.)
a. The salutation from Ar-is-tar-chus ehr iss TAHR kuhs (4:10)
Colossians 4:10 KJV 1900
Aristarchus my fellowprisoner saluteth you, and Marcus, sister’s son to Barnabas, (touching whom ye received commandments: if he come unto you, receive him;)
ehr iss TAHR kuhs (4:10)
Aristarchus was a Thessalonian,
Aristarchus was a Thessalonian,
1). a travel companion of Paul,
Acts 19:29 KJV 1900
And the whole city was filled with confusion: and having caught Gaius and Aristarchus, men of Macedonia, Paul’s companions in travel, they rushed with one accord into the theatre.
,
2). one of those who took the great Gentile love offering to Jerusalem, Acts 20:4
Acts 20:4 KJV 1900
And there accompanied him into Asia Sopater of Berea; and of the Thessalonians, Aristarchus and Secundus; and Gaius of Derbe, and Timotheus; and of Asia, Tychicus and Trophimus.
,
3). a companion of Paul on Paul’s ship-wreck journey to Rome,
4). and an associate of Paul during Paul’s first Roman imprisonment, 4:10, 11; .
5). He is Paul’s “fellow-prisoner.” This means either that he is under arrest with Paul or that he voluntarily shares the captivity of Paul that he might minister to Paul’s needs.
b. The salutation from Marcus (John Mark) (4:10)
1). First time he is mention since Acts when he left Paul
2)
a. Col written ad 64
b. 2Tim. ad 66
3). Paul had a change of heart/he got things right-maybe Timothy got things right. Either case they were together again.
c. The salutation from Jesus (called Justus) (4:11)
And Jesus, which is called Justus, who are of the circumcision. These only are my fellowworkers unto the kingdom of God, which have been a comfort unto me.
Colossians 4:11 KJV 1900
And Jesus, which is called Justus, who are of the circumcision. These only are my fellowworkers unto the kingdom of God, which have been a comfort unto me.
***He, Aris-tar-chus, and John Mark are the only Jewish fellowworkers who have been a consolation to Paul while Paul has been in his Roman prison. All other Jewish fellowworkers have deserted him or have worked in such a way as to bring no comfort to Paul, .
2. The salutations from three Gentile converts to Christianity (4:12–14)
2. The salutations from three Gentile converts to Christianity (4:12–14)
(Now Paul sends salutations from three Gentile converts to Christianity who are with him in Rome)
a. The salutation from Epaphras (4:12, 13)
(1) He is “one of you”—He is a Colossian and he is the founder and pastor of the church at Colosse.
(2) He is a servant (a doulos, a bondservant) of Christ—He is a love-slave of Jesus Christ.
(3) He wrestles in prayer for the Colossians—He constantly agonizes in prayer for his flock that each member might stand perfect (mature) and complete in the will of God. Paul, also, labored in this manner and toward this goal, 1:28, 29.
(4) He has great zeal for his three churches—Paul witnesses to Epaphras’ zeal for the three churches probably founded by him and probably pastored by him. Paul has closely observed the prayers and the conversation of Epaphras after his arrival in Rome and he has discerned his passion for the spiritual growth of his people. The universal church today has few pastors like Epaphras.
b. The salutation from Luke (4:14)
Luke, 4:14, a faithful fellowworker, is not mentioned among the faithful Jewish fellowworkers, so we conclude that he was a Gentile. If this be true, then he is the Bible’s only Gentile human author.
Luke the beloved physician, was one of Paul’s dearest, closest, and most faithful fellowworkers,
Philemon 24 KJV 1900
Marcus, Aristarchus, Demas, Lucas, my fellowlabourers.
.
c. The salutation from Demas (4:14)
c. The salutation from Demas (4:14)
Since Demas is mentioned with no words of recognition or commendation, we assume that his backsliding has already begun. Four years later, when Paul wrote Second Timothy, it was complete, .
C. THE THREE FINAL COMMANDS OF PAUL (4:15–17)
1. The first command—“Salute your two sister churches”
2. The second command—“Exchange epistles with the church at Laodicea”
3. The third command—“Tell Archippus to take heed that he fulfill his ministry” (4:17). Probably Archippus had been appointed by Epaphras to take care of his churches while he was away in Rome. Paul now charges him to take good care of these churches until Epaphras returns.
These three final exhortations deal with the things which are necessary if we as Christians are to have an effective gospel witness. To win the unsaved, we must pray continually for them, walk wisely before them, and speak graciously unto them.)
1. The first exhortation—Pray continually (4:2–4)
a. We are to pray continually and persistently—We as Christians should pray, not continuously but continually, . Also, we should pray not once but persistently for that which we believe we need in order to do God’s will. We should pray until our prayer is answered (; ; ; ) or until God tells us to pray no more about the matter (; ).
b. We are to pray watchfully—We are to pray watching to see that we are not praying selfishly but unselfishly for the progress of God’s kingdom work here on the earth. Also, we should pray watching that our minds do not wander as we pray.
c. We are to pray thankfully—Thanksgiving for past blessings and present blessings should ever be a part of our prayers.
d. We are to pray intercessorily—We are not only to petition God to supply our own needs but are also to intercede with God for the blessing of others. We should continually and persistently pray for the salvation of sinners and the sanctification of saints.
Paul asks the Colossians to pray for him that, in his soon-coming trial before Nero, God will open for Him a door of utterance for the preaching of the gospel (“the mystery of Christ,” the mystery of Jews and Gentiles being saved and joined together as equals in one body through faith in Christ), that he, in accordance with his commission, might make the gospel clearly known to Nero and his imperial court. Paul adds that he is in his Roman prison because of his preaching of “the mystery of Christ” (because of his preaching that uncircumcised Gentiles and circumcised Jews can come to God on equal terms and be joined together in one body as equals in Christ).
2. The second exhortation—Walk wisely (4:5)
We as Christians are to walk wisely before the unsaved, being careful to manifest Christ and nothing but Christ in our lives, ; ; . Sinners are won to Christ not through the exhibition of our lives but through the exhibition of Christ’s life.
We are to “redeem the time,” seize every opportunity to manifest Christ in our conduct, so as to impress the unsaved, ; .
3. The third exhortation—Speak graciously (4:6)
As Christians, our words to the unsaved should be gracious (winsome, attractive, agreeable, pleasing), , seasoned (“seasoned with salt,” palatable, tasty), and suitable (suited to the personality, the position, the state, and the needs of the person spoken to; suited to answering every man wisely). Foolish, jesting, thoughtless, empty, angry, blunt, cutting, and filthy words harm the Christian cause.
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