Faithlife Sermons

How Bad Do You Want It?

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 6 views
Notes & Transcripts
Sermon Tone Analysis
A
D
F
J
S
Emotion
A
C
T
Language
O
C
E
A
E
Social
View more →

New Year’s Resolutions

Resolutions
Did any of you set resolutions for this next year?
What are some of the resolutions you have set?
What about last year? Do you remember the resolutions you set last year and did you accomplish them?
What is the purpose of a resolution?
Definition: “a firm decision to do or not to do something.”
Do you think people have a high success rate?
a firm decision to do or not to do something.
Why do you think people often fail at their “firm decisions?”
Read Facts Sheet

Aiming For Nothing But the Best of God

Knowing the Love of God ()
Paul’s prayer is that we could comprehend the vastness of the love of God.
Yet he acknowledges that this love surpasses knowledge (vs 19)
The love of Christ is infinitely greater than anyone can fully know or imagine, and it is also much more than any object of knowledge; it is superior to knowledge (), even to spiritual knowledge (). It must find expression in experience, in sorrows and joys, trials and sufferings, in ways too deep for the human mind to fathom, or for human language to express.
The love of Christ is infinitely greater than anyone can fully know or imagine, and it is also much more than any object of knowledge; it is superior to knowledge (), even to spiritual knowledge (). It must find expression in experience, in sorrows and joys, trials and sufferings, in ways too deep for the human mind to fathom, or for human language to express. Foulkes, F. (1989).
And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.
 And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.

2 And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.

Paul also prays that we would be filled with all the fullness of God (vs. 19)
The climax of the apostle’s prayer for his fellow-Christians is that they may be filled with all the fullness of God. He thus prays ultimately that they may receive not any attribute of God, or any gift of his, not love, not knowledge, not strength, alone or in combination—but no less than the very highest he can pray for, the full indwelling of God. This ‘defies even the beginnings of our understanding’ (Stott), but we should not miss the point of what the apostle is striving to express. Of course the eternal God can never be limited to the capacity of any one, or all, of his sinful creatures; at the same time Paul does not want to pray for anything less than that God’s people may be filled to (eis) the very fullest of himself that he seeks to bring into their lives (see on 1:23). For his own life, and for those to whom he ministers, Paul wants no less than the Spirit’s full indwelling (5:18). Of his fullness, and not just of a part of his nature, all may receive (); and the goal for the individual and for the body must be nothing short of ‘the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ’ (4:13). Foulkes, F.
The climax of the apostle’s prayer for his fellow-Christians is that they may be filled with all the fullness of God. He thus prays ultimately that they may receive not any attribute of God, or any gift of his, not love, not knowledge, not strength, alone or in combination—but no less than the very highest he can pray for, the full indwelling of God. This ‘defies even the beginnings of our understanding’ (Stott), but we should not miss the point of what the apostle is striving to express. Of course the eternal God can never be limited to the capacity of any one, or all, of his sinful creatures; at the same time Paul does not want to pray for anything less than that God’s people may be filled to (eis) the very fullest of himself that he seeks to bring into their lives (see on 1:23). For his own life, and for those to whom he ministers, Paul wants no less than the Spirit’s full indwelling (5:18). Of his fullness, and not just of a part of his nature, all may receive (); and the goal for the individual and for the body must be nothing short of ‘the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ’ (4:13). Foulkes, F.
Robinson well says, ‘No prayer that has ever been framed has uttered a bolder request.’ Yet ‘unabashed by the greatness of his petition, he triumphantly invokes a power which can do far more than he asks, far more than even his lofty imagination conceives.’ Foulkes, F. (1989).
Robinson well says, ‘No prayer that has ever been framed has uttered a bolder request.’ Yet ‘unabashed by the greatness of his petition, he triumphantly invokes a power which can do far more than he asks, far more than even his lofty imagination conceives.’ Foulkes, F. (1989).
Power to do more (vs. 20,21)
Verses 20–21 declare a thrilling benediction, closing this first section of the letter. God works in us! God works through us! God is glorified in us! What a wonderful salvation we have! This power works in us as we open our hearts to Christ, cultivate this abiding fellowship, pray, and submit to the Word. There is no reason for us believers to be “down in the dumps” when we are seated with Christ (2:6) and filled with God’s fullness.
Robinson well says, ‘No prayer that has ever been framed has uttered a bolder request.’ Yet ‘unabashed by the greatness of his petition, he triumphantly invokes a power which can do far more than he asks, far more than even his lofty imagination conceives.’ Foulkes, F. (1989).
Paul is aiming for nothing less than the highest he can attain in Christ, and yet he realizes that God is still able to do more than what he can even ask and think.
Verses 20–21 declare a thrilling benediction, closing this first section of the letter. God works in us! God works through us! God is glorified in us! What a wonderful salvation we have! This power works in us as we open our hearts to Christ, cultivate this abiding fellowship, pray, and submit to the Word.
The next 4 chapters of Ephesians are about to go into the practical doing in the every day life of the believer.

How Bad Do You Want It?

Foulkes, F. (1989). Ephesians: an introduction and commentary (Vol. 10, p. 112). Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.
How bad do you want everything that God has to offer?
How bad do you want to comprehend and experience the love of God that surpasses knowledge?
How bad do you want to walk in the power of the Holy Spirit in your life and ministry?
What are we doing to cultivate our fellowship with Christ? The sky is the limit!!!
Wiersbe, W. W. (1992). Wiersbe’s expository outlines on the New Testament (p. 546). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
Wiersbe, W. W. (1992). Wiersbe’s expository outlines on the New Testament (p. 547). Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
The love of Christ is infinitely greater than anyone can fully know or imagine, and it is also much more than any object of knowledge; it is superior to knowledge (), even to spiritual knowledge (). It must find expression in experience, in sorrows and joys, trials and sufferings, in ways too deep for the human mind to fathom, or for human language to express.
Foulkes, F. (1989). Ephesians: an introduction and commentary (Vol. 10, p. 112). Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.
Robinson well says, ‘No prayer that has ever been framed has uttered a bolder request.’ Yet ‘unabashed by the greatness of his petition, he triumphantly invokes a power which can do far more than he asks, far more than even his lofty imagination conceives.’
Foulkes, F. (1989).
Foulkes, F.
Related Media
Related Sermons