Faithlife Sermons

Our Partnership

Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 2 views
Notes & Transcripts
Sermon Tone Analysis
A
D
F
J
S
Emotion
A
C
T
Language
O
C
E
A
E
Social
View more →
Title: Our Partnership
Text:
Text:
Intro: My sermon today is not the one I had intended on preaching. I had another outline prepared to put in the bulletin that was from the fourth chapter of Philippians, but when I began reading the first chapter to get the feel of where the apostle Paul was coming from that led him to write chapter four, I saw or maybe, God showed me some truths that jumped out at me. Truths that you and I both need to hear, to know, and hopefully act on.
Intro: My sermon today is not the one I had intended on preaching. I had another outline prepared to put in the bulletin, but when I began reading the first chapter of Philippians to get the feel of where the apostle Paul was coming from that led him to write chapter four, I saw, or maybe, God showed me some truths that jumped out at me. Truths that you and I both need to hear, to know, and hopefully act on.
This is one of those sermon, where the speaker may need it more than the listeners, but much of it I sure we all need. In life we often get sidetracked by the world, by religion, and by tradition to the point that we end up off the path God has laid for us. When this happens it explains why things don't go as God would want and we would like. There's no doubt in my mind that God's plan for His church, and His specific plan for this church, is a good and workable plan. It's a plan that will bring glory to Him and good to us. But it will never accomplish its goal unless we know it and practice it.
In life we often get sidetracked by the world, by religion, and by tradition to the point that we end up off the path God has laid for us. When this happens it explains why things don't go as God would want and we would like. There's no doubt in my mind that God's plan for His church, and His specific plan for this church, is a good and workable plan. It's a plan that will bring glory to Him and good to us. But the plan will never accomplish its goal unless we know it and put it into practice.
What stood out to me about this chapter is that Paul didn't view his relationship with the church at Philippi as a pastor/Congregation relationship, or as a leader/follower type relationship, but rather as a partnership. He considered the members of the church as being co-workers. They were fellow followers of the Lord Jesus. They were one body, seeking to obtain the same goals and accomplishments.
What stood out to me in the first part of chapter one is how Paul didn't view his relationship with the church at Philippi as a pastor/Congregation relationship, or as a leader/follower type relationship, but rather as a partnership. He considered the members of the church as being co-workers. They were fellow followers of the Lord Jesus. They were one body, seeking to obtain the same goals and accomplishments.
What does a partnership mean? According to the dictionary it means, a relationship resembling a legal partnership and usually involving close cooperation between parties having specified and joint rights and responsibilities.
What does a partnership mean? According to the dictionary it means, a relationship resembling a legal partnership and usually involving close cooperation between parties having specified and joint rights and responsibilities.
It may not be good math, but sometimes when you add one and one together you come up with a sum that is much greater than 2. When the work of Paul and the work of the Philippi church is added together, you come up with more than the sum of what either one could do by themselves. You come up with a number that is infinite. There is no limit to what a body can do when it's put together correctly and functioning properly.
It may not be good math, but sometimes when you add one and one together you come up with a sum that is much greater than two. When the work of Paul and the work of the Philippi church is added together, you come up with more than the sum of what either one could do by themselves. You come up with a number that is infinite. There is no limit to what the body of Christ can do when it's put together correctly and functioning properly.
I think this is what Jesus meant when He said, “Truly, truly, I say to you, whoever believes in me will also do the works that I do; and greater works than these will he do, because I am going to the Father. 13 Whatever you ask in my name, this I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son. 14 If you ask me anything in my name, I will do it" ().
I think this is what Jesus meant when He said, “Truly, truly, I say to you, whoever believes in me will also do the works that I do; and greater works than these will he do, because I am going to the Father. 13 Whatever you ask in my name, this I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son. 14 If you ask me anything in my name, I will do it" ().
We (the church), will be able to do greater works than Him because He goes back to the Father. He is here alluding to His ascension after His resurrection. He said in , " Nevertheless, I tell you the truth: it is to your advantage that I go away, for if I do not go away, the Helper will not come to you. But if I go, I will send him to you."
We (the church), will be able to do greater works than Him because He goes back to the Father. He is alluding to His ascension after His resurrection. He said in , " Nevertheless, I tell you the truth: it is to your advantage that I go away, for if I do not go away, the Helper will not come to you. But if I go, I will send him to you."
The Holy Spirit lives in every believer. empowers every believer, and calls every believer to be partners in the work of the gospel. together. Consequently, we as the body of Christ can do more than Jesus could living in His physical form.
The Holy Spirit lives in every believer. empowers every believer, and calls every believer to be partners in the work of the gospel. Consequently, we as the body of Christ can do more than Jesus could in His physical form.
He can do more through us, who make up the body, when we purposely partner up with someone else. Of all the New Testament people, Paul understood this better than any of them, and here in the book of Philippians he explains it.
He can do more through us, who make up the body, when we purposely partner up within the body. Paul understood this, and here in the book of Philippians he explains it.
In verse one we see that he addresses his letter to everyone in the church at Philippi, elders, deacons and all the saints of the church. And in verse three we see the bond between him and the saints at Philippi. To say that the Christians are the saints means, therefore, that the Christians are different from other people. Where does that difference lie?
READ TEXT:
To all the saints in Christ Jesus who are at Philippi, with the overseers and deacons:
In verse one we see that he addresses his letter to everyone in the church at Philippi, elders, deacons and all the saints of the church. To say that the Christians are the saints means, therefore, that the Christians are different from other people. But where does that difference lie?
2 Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.
William Barclay, in his commentary, points out the significance of Paul addressing his people as saints in Christ Jesus. He writes, "No one can read his letters without seeing how often the phrases in Christ, in Christ Jesus, in the Lord occur. In Christ Jesus occurs forty-eight times, in Christ thirty-four times, and in the Lord fifty times. Clearly, this was for Paul the very essence of Christianity.
Thanksgiving and Prayer
"In Marvin R. Vincent commentary, he says that 'when Paul spoke of the Christian being in Christ, he meant that the Christian lives in Christ as a bird in the air, a fish in the water, the roots of a tree in the soil. What makes Christians different is that they are always and everywhere conscious of the encircling presence of Jesus Christ.'"
3 I thank my God in all my remembrance of you, 4 always in every prayer of mine for you all making my prayer with joy, 5 because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now. 6 And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ. 7 It is right for me to feel this way about you all, because I hold you in my heart, for you are all partakers with me of grace, both in my imprisonment and in the defense and confirmation of the gospel. 8 For God is my witness, how I yearn for you all with the affection of Christ Jesus. 9 And it is my prayer that your love may abound more and more, with knowledge and all discernment, 10 so that you may approve what is excellent, and so be pure and blameless for the day of Christ, 11 filled with the fruit of righteousness that comes through Jesus Christ, to the glory and praise of God.
William Barclay then adds that "when Paul speaks of the saints in Christ Jesus, he means those who are different from other people and who are consecrated to God because of their special relationship to Jesus Christ—and that is what every Christian should be."
In verse one we see that he addresses his letter to everyone in the church at Philippi, elders, deacons and all the saints of the church. And in verse three we see the bond between him and the saints at Philippi. To say that the Christians are the saints means, therefore, that the Christians are different from other people. Where does that difference lie?
Do you see yourself this way? Do others identify you as being different because of your relationship to Jesus Christ? We must be different to be a light on a high and salt to the earth.
William Barclay, in his commentary, points out the significance of Paul addressing his people as saints in Christ Jesus. He writes, "No one can read his letters without seeing how often the phrases in Christ, in Christ Jesus, in the Lord occur. In Christ Jesus occurs forty-eight times, in Christ thirty-four times, and in the Lord fifty times. Clearly, this was for Paul the very essence of Christianity. What did he mean? In Marvin R. Vincent commentary, he says that when Paul spoke of the Christian being in Christ, he meant that the Christian lives in Christ as a bird in the air, a fish in the water, the roots of a tree in the soil. What makes Christians different is that they are always and everywhere conscious of the encircling presence of Jesus Christ.
In verse five we see what motivates Paul to pray for the Philippi saints and what it is that brings him so much joy as he remembers them. The key element was their partnership.
William Barclay then says that "when Paul speaks of the saints in Christ Jesus, he means those who are different from other people and who are consecrated to God because of their special relationship to Jesus Christ—and that is what every Christian should be."
I. We are Partners In The Gospel
Do you see yourself this way? Do others identify you as being different because of your relationship to Jesus Christ? We are truly different. We must be different to be a light on a high and salt to the earth.
Paul and the church at Philippi were partners together, especially in the work of the gospel. Look at verses 3-5, "I thank my God in all my remembrance of you, 4 always in every prayer of mine for you all making my prayer with joy, 5 because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now.
But it's in verse five that we see what motivates him to pray for them and what it is that brings him so much joy as he remembers them. The key element was their partnership. Throughout our passage Paul speaks of their partnership.
Paul loved and cared about all the churches that he founded, but a study of his church letters reveal that this particular church at Philippi had a special place in his heart. They had loved him like a father and he had loved them like his children. In chapter 4, verses 14-15, we see that this was the first church to partner with him, helping to meet his needs. Here he writes, "Yet it was kind of you to share my trouble. 15 And you Philippians yourselves know that in the beginning of the gospel, when I left Macedonia, no church entered into partnership with me in giving and receiving, except you only.
I. We are Partners In The Gospel
I once read about a pastor who became quite famous in the church world for his speaking ability and sermonizing, yet he never pastored but one small congregation in the northeast. At one point he received a call from a very large and influential church. He even accepted their call, but on the day he was to leave his little church, many of the members came to see him off. At some point, with some of the members weeping, he began to weep. This wasn't a church he was leaving, it was the people he loved and that loved him. It was his family. He then realized he couldn't do it. He couldn't leave his wonderful and loving church family.
Paul and the church at Philippi were partners together, especially in the work of the gospel. Look at verses 3-5, "I thank my God in all my remembrance of you, 4 always in every prayer of mine for you all making my prayer with joy, 5 because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now.
I think this is how Paul viewed the church at Philippi. He didn't see them as a congregation, he saw them as family, his partners in the ministry. Whenever he prayed for them, which he did every time he prayed, he experienced great joy. They were his joy producers.
Paul loved and cared about all the churches that he founded, but a study of his church letters reveal that this particular church at Philippi had a special place in his heart. They had loved him like a father and he had loved them like his children. In chapter 4, verses 14-15, we see that this was the first church to partner with him, helping to meet his needs. Here he writes, "Yet it was kind of you to share my trouble. 15 And you Philippians yourselves know that in the beginning of the gospel, when I left Macedonia, no church entered into partnership with me in giving and receiving, except you only.
I know what he's talking about. This is the way I view this church. You are not just a church, you're my family, whom I love dearly, and from whom I have felt much love. And many of you are absolute joy producers. You are more than a blessing to your family and friends, you are a blessing to this church and to me as a pastor. Without you this church would fold. Without you we couldn't pay our bills. Without you we couldn't furnish a van for people to get to church.
I once read about a pastor who became quite famous in the church world for his speaking ability and sermonizing, yet he never pastored but one small congregation in the northeast. At one point he did received a call from a very large and influential church. He even accepted their call, but on the day he was to leave his little church, many of the members came to see him off. At some point, with some of the members weeping, he began to weep. This wasn't a church he was leaving, it was the people he loved and that loved him. It was his family. He then realized he couldn't do it. He couldn't leave his wonderful and loving family.
Over the years I've had to say goodbye to many joy producers. Some of the easiest funerals to preach is at the same time the hardest ones to preach. It's hard, because one of my joy producers is gone. It's hard because one of my partners in the gospel is gone.
I think this is how Paul viewed the church at Philippi. He didn't see them as a congregation, he saw them as his family, his partners in the ministry. Whenever he prayed for them, which he did every time he prayed, he experienced great joy. They were his joy producers.
But not everyone who is a church member see themselves as partners in the ministry. We, beginning with me, need to understand that we are partners in the ministry. I guess I fail to see that sometimes. I'm certain, that I've failed to help you to see this.
I know what he's talking about. This is the way I view this church. You are not just a church, you're my family, whom I love dearly. And I can say as did Paul, many of you are absolute joy producers. You are more than a blessing to your family and friends, you are a blessing to this church and to me as a pastor. Without you this church would fold. Without you we couldn't pay our bills. Without you we couldn't furnish a van for people to get to church.
A month or two ago I was telling my reunion group from the Great Banquet about something I had been doing here at the church, when Lon Lorton, the pastor of the Presbyterian church gave me a kindly rebuke. He quoted a man he heard at a minister conference who said God has given us someone to do those kinds of tasks, so the minister can spend more time in the word and in prayer. He then said, God calls them deacons.
Over the years I've had to say goodbye to many such joy producers. Some of the easiest funerals to preach is at the same time the hardest ones to preach. It's hard, because one of my joy producers is gone. It's hard because one of my partners in the gospel is gone.
There are many things that some of you could and should be doing, but I have found it easier to do them myself instead of recruiting you. I'm trying to change my ways. The last three times someone has told me to announce something, I've let them do it. And guess what, none of the three people died in the pulpit. Having different people up here breaks the monotony.
But not everyone who is a church member see themselves as partners in the ministry. We, beginning with me, need to understand that we are partners in the ministry. I guess I fail to see that sometimes. I believe I have failed to help you to see this.
In our text, Paul addresses not just elders, not just deacons, but the all the saints at Philippi. He is showing you and me that all of us are partners in the gospel.
A month or two ago I was telling my reunion group from the Great Banquet about something I had been doing here at the church, when Lon Lorton, the pastor of the Presbyterian church gave me a kindly rebuke. He quoted a man he heard at a minister conference who said God has given us someone to do those kinds of tasks, so the minister can spend more time in the word and in prayer. He then said, God calls them deacons.
We are partners in sharing the gospel. We are partners in displaying the gospel. We are partners in the good news that Jesus has come to restore our relationship with God. We are partners in what takes place in this building and outside of this building.
There are many things that you could be and should be doing, but I have found it easier to do them myself instead of recruiting some of you. In our text, Paul addresses not just elders, not just deacons, but the all the saints at Philippi. he is showing you and me that all of us are to be partners in the gospel.
I feel that prior to message, there is too much of me up here. There are others who can begin our service. There are others who can lead in prayer. There are others who can make announcements. For we are partners together in the gospel.
We are partners in sharing the gospel. We are partners in displaying the gospel. We are partners in the good news that Jesus has come to restore our relationship with God. We are partners in what takes place in this building and outside of this building.
But just what is the gospel? It's the good news that Jesus Christ has restored our relationship with God. We are to be like a father I recently read about. In her book "I Never Walk the Halls Alone, Donna Kincheloe wrote about her experiences as a critical care nurse. One of her stories involved her own grandfather, who had raised her. When she received word of his heart attack, she went to his bedside. He tried to talk to her but no sound came out his mouth. But through the years she had spent in intensive care, she had learned how to read lips. Her grandfather was pleading to see his two children, Dee and Bud. Unfortunately, they had a falling out with one another and had not spoken to one another in twelve years. But because of his dying wish they both came to his bedside. Donna's mom and her uncle Bud wanted her there to interpret for them. She said "her Mom was on his left and uncle Bud was on his right when grandpa reached up and took Mom's right hand and Bud's left hand and put them together. He then covered their hands with his own strong mechanic's hands and mouthed two words over and over, 'Make up. Make up. Make up.'"
Prior to the preaching, there is too much of me up here. There are others who can begin our service. There are others who can lead in prayer. There are others who can make announcements. For we are partners together in the gospel.
Christ died so that we might be able to make up with God. The gospel is the good news that we can now join hands with God, for Christ has paid for our sins. He has restored our relationship with God.
The gospel is to be our focus. The gospel is the good news that Christ has restored our relationship with God. We are to be like a father I recently read about. In her book "I Never Walk the Halls Alone, Donna Kincheloe wrote about her experiences as a critical care nurse. One of her stories involved her own grandfather, who had raised her. When she received word of his heart attack, she reached to his bedside. He tried to talk to her but no sound came out his mouth. But through the years she had spent in intensive care, she had learned how to read lips. Her grandfather was pleading to see his two children, Dee and Bud. Unfortunately, they had a falling out with one another and had not spoken to one another in twelve years. But because of his dying wish they both came to his bedside. Donna's mom and her uncle Bud wanted her there to interpret for them. She said "her Mom was on his left and uncle Bud was on his right when grandpa reached up and took Mom's right hand and Bud's left hand and put them together. he then covered their hands with his own strong mechanic's hands and mouthed two words over and over, 'Make up. Make up. Make up.'"
We are to be partners in the gospel and in God's grace.
Christ died so that we might be able to make up with God. The gospel is the good news that we can join hands with God, for Christ has paid for our sins. He has restored our relationship with God.
II. We are Partners In God's Grace
We are partners in the gospel and in God's grace.
Paul says in verse seven, It is right for me to feel this way about you all, because I hold you in my heart, for you are all partakers with me of grace,…"
II. We are Partners In God's Grace
We are partners in gospel because we are partakers or partners in God's grace. Only the saved will be true partners. Only the saved will be different from the world. Only the saved will be able to tithe a tenth of their income. Only the saved will be willing to get out of their comfort zone for the work of the gospel. Only the saved will sacrifice their time for the work of the ministry. Only the saved are motivated to die to self and live for Christ.
Paul says in verse seven, It is right for me to feel this way about you all, because I hold you in my heart, for you are all partakers with me of grace,…"
Paul is reminding them and us that it's all about God's grace. His grace, his unmerited favor, is what makes our salvation possible. Paul wrote these words to the saints at Ephesus, "For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, 9 not a result of works, so that no one may boast" ().
We are partners in gospel because we are partners in God's grace. Only the saved will be true partners. Only the saved will be different from the world. Only the saved will be able to tithe a tenth of their income. Only the saved will be willing to get out of their comfort zone for the work of the gospel. Only the saved will sacrifice their time for the work of the ministry. Only the saved are motivated to die to self and live for Christ.
In his song, Amazing Grace, John Newton called it amazing grace, "for it saved a wretch like me."
Paul is reminding them and us that it's all about God's grace. His grace, his unmerited favor, is what makes our salvation possible. Paul wrote these words to the saints at Ephesus, "For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, 9 not a result of works, so that no one may boast" ().
In her song, Grace Greater than our sin, Julia H. Johnston calls it marvelous grace because it pardons cleanses within. The chorus of her song reads, "Grace, Grace, God's grace, Grace that will pardons and cleanse within; Grace, grace, God's grace, Grace that is greater than all our sin."
In his song, Amazing Grace, John Newton called it amazing grace, "for it saved a wretch like me."
Without this grace, you can still attend church. Without this grace, you can put a few dollars in the offering place each Sunday. But without this grace you can never ever set foot in heaven, you can never have your sins forgiven, you can never forgive those who've done you wrong, you can never be partners in the gospel.
In her song, Grace Greater than our sin, Julia H. Johnston calls it marvelous grace because it pardons cleanses within. The course of her song reads, "Grace, Grace, God's grace, Grace that will pardons and cleanse within; Grace, grace, God's grace, Grace that is greater than all our sin."
Do you have this grace in your life? Do you have your sins forgiven and your relationship with God restored. If not, you can today. If not, why not? His amazing grace, His marvelous grace is available to whosoever will come to Christ, the fountain of living water.
Without this grace, you can still attend church. Without this grace, you can put a few dollars in the offering place. But without this grace you can never set foot in heaven, you can never have your sins forgiven, you cannot forgive those who've done you wrong, you can never be partners in the gospel.
Yes, we who are saints are partners in the gospel and in His grace, but we must also be partners in our sufferings.
Do you have this grace in your life? Do you have your sins forgiven and your relationship with God restored. If not, you can today. If not, why not? His amazing grace, His marvelous grace is available to whosoever will come to Christ, the fountain of living water.
III. We are Partners in Our Sufferings
Yes, we who are saints are partners in the gospel and in His grace, but we must also be partners in our sufferings.
We live in a sin cursed world, consequently, we will experience hardships. We will go through periods of sufferings. But our sufferings are so much lighter if we are partners in them. We are to comfort one another when times of suffering comes. Once again, look at verse seven of our text, "It is right for me to feel this way about you all, because I hold you in my heart, for you are all partakers with me of grace, both in my imprisonment and in the defense and confirmation of the gospel."
III. We are Partners in Our Sufferings
The apostle Paul is in prison at the time he wrote this letter. He is suffering because of his connection to Christ and his work in the gospel. Since they are partners with him, he shares the sufferings he is experiencing. But instead of seeking their comfort, he seeks to comfort them.
We live in a sin cursed world, consequently, we will experience hardships. We will go through periods of sufferings. But our sufferings are so much lighter if we are partners in them. We are to comfort one another when times of suffering comes. Once again, look at verse seven of our text, "It is right for me to feel this way about you all, because I hold you in my heart, for you are all partakers with me of grace, both in my imprisonment and in the defense and confirmation of the gospel."
He writes, "I want you to know, brothers, that what has happened to me has really served to advance the gospel, 13 so that it has become known throughout the whole imperial guard and to all the rest that my imprisonment is for Christ. 14 And most of the brothers, having become confident in the Lord by my imprisonment, are much more bold to speak the word without fear.
The apostle Paul is in prison at the time he wrote this letter. He is suffering because of his connection to Christ and his work to share the gospel. Since they are partners with him, he shares the sufferings he is experiencing. But instead of seeking their comfort, he seeks to comfort them.
Paul sees the hand of God at work in his imprisonment. He doesn't see his imprisonment as a bad thing. If it was a bad thing, God wouldn't have let it happen. Thus, Paul looked for reasons that God had allowed his suffering. And he saw it. His imprisonment allowed him to share the gospel with the many guards that were assigned to him during his imprisonment. Furthermore, he sees how his imprisonment has motivated others to become more bold in their witness of the gospel.
He writes, "I want you to know, brothers, that what has happened to me has really served to advance the gospel, 13 so that it has become known throughout the whole imperial guard and to all the rest that my imprisonment is for Christ. 14 And most of the brothers, having become confident in the Lord by my imprisonment, are much more bold to speak the word without fear.
Paul understood and believed in the sovereignty of God. He believed , "And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, 29 for those who are called according to his purpose. For those whom he foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, in order that he might be the firstborn among many brothers."
Paul sees the hand of God at work in his imprisonment. He doesn't see his imprisonment as a bad thing. If it was a bad thing, God wouldn't have let it happen. Thus, Paul looked for reasons that God had allowed his suffering. And he saw it as an opportunity to share the gospel with the many guards that were assigned to him during imprisonment. Furthermore, he sees that his imprisonment has motivated others to become more bold in their witness of the gospel.
If we can see our sufferings as part of God's plan, we can embrace our sufferings instead of fretting over them. In other words, we can rejoice when hardships and sufferings come our way.
Paul understood and believed in the sovereignty of God. He believed , "And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, 29 for those who are called according to his purpose. For those whom he foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, in order that he might be the firstborn among many brothers."
Being partners in suffering means being willing to suffer for Christ's sake, but it also means being willing to comfort one another in our suffering. Partners help one another out. We support one another. We reach out to one another.
If we can see our sufferings as part of God's plan, we can embrace our sufferings instead of fretting over them. In other words, we can rejoice when time of hardship and sufferings come our way.
When I visited Bill Jones two days after my knee surgery, the first words out of his mouth was, how is your knee doing. I later found out that he told Jane the next day, that I needed a whipping for coming up there on my knee. Bill is suffering greatly from lung cancer, but he is thinking of others. He was concerned about me and my leg. And more than once he has had Jane write out their tithe check to give to me for the church.
Being partners in suffering means being willing to suffer for Christ's sake, but it also means being willing to comfort one another in our suffering. Partners help one another out. We support one another. We reach out to one another.
He's in the latter stages of cancer, but he is still partnering with us in the work of the gospel. People who are serious about their partnership in the gospel should motivate us and even shame some of us who never tithe, who never sacrifice, who never truly become partners in the ministry.
When I visited Bill Jones this past Friday, the first words out of his mouth was, how is your knee doing. I later found out that he told Jane the next day, that I didn't need to be visiting him with my knee after having surgery on it two days earlier. Bill is suffering greatly from lung cancer, but he is thinking of others. He was concerned about me and my leg. More than once he has had Jane write out a check their tithe check to give to me to take to church.
Are you a partner in the gospel? Are you a partner in God's grace? Are you a partner in the suffering? If so prove it with your actions, your compassion, your sacrifices. And prove it by growing in the Lord.
He is in the latter stages of cancer, but he is still partnering with us in the work of the gospel. People who are serious about their partnership in the gospel should motivate us and even shame some of us who never tithe, who never sacrifice, who never truly become partners in the ministry.
IV. We are Partners in Growth
Are you a partner in the gospel? Are you a partner in God's grace? Are you a partner in the suffering? If so prove it with your actions, your compassion, your sacrifices. And prove it by growing in the Lord.
In verses 9-11 we read these words, 9 And it is my prayer that your love may abound more and more, with knowledge and all discernment, 10 so that you may approve what is excellent, and so be pure and blameless for the day of Christ, 11 filled with the fruit of righteousness that comes through Jesus Christ, to the glory and praise of God.
IV. We are Partners in Growth
A study of Paul's life will reveal much spiritual growth over a period of time. It is God's will that we grow together. In these verse Paul is urging the saints at Philippi to grow in their knowledge and discernment so that they might be filled with the fruits of righteousness that comes from Jesus Christ.
V. We are Partners In Prayer
If you're not attending a morning Bible study class during our Sunday School hour, you should be. If you're not reading the Bible and other good Bible help books, you should be. If you're not having a devotional time each day, you should have.
Spiritual growth is not an option for the saint of God. We are commanded to grow. We are commanded to grow out of our infancy, thus no longer needing to be fed the milk of the word, but instead, grow up and eat the meat of the word.
And last of all, we are to be partners in prayer.
V. We are Partners In Prayer
Look once more at verses 3-5 of our passage. They read, "I thank my God in all my remembrance of you, 4 always in every prayer of mine for you all making my prayer with joy, 5 because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now."
It is because of his partnership with the Philippi church that he always remembers them in his prayers. So where does prayer fit into your life? Do you pray every day? Do you pray for your partners, your fellow workers in the gospel? Do you pray for those suffering, the Bill Jones' of our church, those who are dealing with illnesses, financial problems, relationship problems? Do you pray about the finances of our church? Do you pray about our attendance? Do you pray for new people to come and to come back?
Do you pray, or do you simply talk about these things. Partners pray. Partners get involved. Partners support and encourage one another.
Conclusion: In Conclusion, God wants us to be partners in the gospel. So let us partner together in the new year. Let us join together in prayer. Let us join together in our giving. Let us join together in the activities we provide. Let us join together in our witness, inviting others to join you for a church service. Let us join together in some of the tasks that needs to be done.
But most of all, let us join together in the amazing grace of God. What I mean is if you're not saved, turn to Christ and accept God's marvelous grace.
Related Media
Related Sermons