Faithlife Sermons

When Life Hurts

The Book of Beginnings  •  Sermon  •  Submitted   •  Presented   •  47:16
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Will you trust God even when life hurts?

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INTRO
Living with Pain
Living with Pain
Illustration of need addressed.
Trouble and pain are inexorably intertwined. Overcoming, or breaking the pain barrier, is one of the secrets of victorious living. It is estimated 1 / 400k babies born will have a rare genetic disease called dys-ant-on-omia. Victims are unable to feel pain and usually die early. However, many people, athletes in particular, have their careers and lives altered because they take drugs to dull pain rather than discovering and treating the source of the problem. Pain is not God’s way of punishing people; but rather His way of warning persons that something is wrong physically, mentally, or spiritually.
Jesus did not shy away from difficulties...
John 12:27–28 ESV
“Now is my soul troubled. And what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour’? But for this purpose I have come to this hour. Father, glorify your name.” Then a voice came from heaven: “I have glorified it, and I will glorify it again.”
G. Curtis Jones, 1000 Illustrations for Preaching and Teaching (Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1986), 279.Illustration of need addressed.
Rachel's tomb is marked in the north of Bethlehem on the basis of . Rachel, wife of Jacob and one of the four matriarchs of Israel, died in Bethlehem while giving birth to her second son Benjamin, the youngest child of Jacob, and she was buried here. The Crusaders built the first structure over her burial place, but it was known as a place of pilgrimage before then and a small pyramid was set there. The present building, a square domed structure containing a large tomb covered with a velvet cloth, was erected by Sir Moses Montefiore in the mid 19th century.
Rachel's tomb is marked in the north of Bethlehem on the basis of . Rachel, wife of Jacob and one of the four matriarchs of Israel, died in Bethlehem while giving birth to her second son Benjamin, the youngest child of Jacob, and she was buried here. The Crusaders built the first structure over her burial place, but it was known as a place of pilgrimage before then and a small pyramid was set there. The present building, a square domed structure containing a large tomb covered with a velvet cloth, was erected by Sir Moses Montefiore in the mid 19th century.
There is an inscription on this tomb which reads, “Thus saith the Lord: A voice was heard in Ramah, lamentation and bitter weeping; Rachel weeping for her children” (). The weepoing of Rachel, the suffering mother, was adopted by Matthew to describe Herod’s slaughter of the innicent children in Bethlehem (). Rachels tomb has become a place of pilgramige for Jews, Christians, and Moslems; particularly for women praying to have a child.
There is an inscription on this tomb which reads, “Thus saith the Lord: A voice was heard in Ramah, lamentation and bitter weeping; Rachel weeping for her children” (). The weeping of Rachel, the suffering mother, was adopted by Matthew to describe Herod’s slaughter of the innocent children in Bethlehem (). Rachel's tomb continues to be a place of pilgrimage for Jews, Christians, and Moslems; particularly for women praying to have a child.
Connect illustration to present day hearers.
Transition = Show this need or similar issue was also the question behind the biblical text.
Clearly state the theme of the text/sermon.
Title & Text
When Life Hurts
- krux = What makes one persons Benoni another’s Benjamin?
Proposition
Because God is faithful we should trust Him even when life hurts.
Benefits
Difficulties
Patience
Disappointments
Perseverance
Death
Perseverance
Peace
Pray
S.T.A.R.T.
Solemnly praise and recognize the greatness of our God and Savior connected to the Biblical text being preached
Touch upon the subject of corporate sin and confess any shortcomings the body has committed related to the Biblical text to be preached
Ask God to help the body/local church to hear and apply the truths of the Biblical text to be preached
Review and remind the audience of the key related passages to the Biblical text being preached
Transition to the opening of the sermon and the Biblical text to be preached
THE SERMON BODY
Sermon Outline
Genesis 35:16–29 ESV
16 Then they journeyed from Bethel. When they were still some distance from Ephrath, Rachel went into labor, and she had hard labor. 17 And when her labor was at its hardest, the midwife said to her, “Do not fear, for you have another son.” 18 And as her soul was departing (for she was dying), she called his name Ben-oni; but his father called him Benjamin. 19 So Rachel died, and she was buried on the way to Ephrath (that is, Bethlehem), 20 and Jacob set up a pillar over her tomb. It is the pillar of Rachel’s tomb, which is there to this day. 21 Israel journeyed on and pitched his tent beyond the tower of Eder. 22 While Israel lived in that land, Reuben went and lay with Bilhah his father’s concubine. And Israel heard of it. Now the sons of Jacob were twelve. 23 The sons of Leah: Reuben (Jacob’s firstborn), Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, and Zebulun. 24 The sons of Rachel: Joseph and Benjamin. 25 The sons of Bilhah, Rachel’s servant: Dan and Naphtali. 26 The sons of Zilpah, Leah’s servant: Gad and Asher. These were the sons of Jacob who were born to him in Paddan-aram. 27 And Jacob came to his father Isaac at Mamre, or Kiriath-arba (that is, Hebron), where Abraham and Isaac had sojourned. 28 Now the days of Isaac were 180 years. 29 And Isaac breathed his last, and he died and was gathered to his people, old and full of days. And his sons Esau and Jacob buried him.
Genesis 36:1–3 ESV
1 These are the generations of Esau (that is, Edom). 2 Esau took his wives from the Canaanites: Adah the daughter of Elon the Hittite, Oholibamah the daughter of Anah the daughter of Zibeon the Hivite, 3 and Basemath, Ishmael’s daughter, the sister of Nebaioth.
Gen 36:
Genesis 36:6–7 ESV
6 Then Esau took his wives, his sons, his daughters, and all the members of his household, his livestock, all his beasts, and all his property that he had acquired in the land of Canaan. He went into a land away from his brother Jacob. 7 For their possessions were too great for them to dwell together. The land of their sojournings could not support them because of their livestock.
Genesis 36:6–8 ESV
6 Then Esau took his wives, his sons, his daughters, and all the members of his household, his livestock, all his beasts, and all his property that he had acquired in the land of Canaan. He went into a land away from his brother Jacob. 7 For their possessions were too great for them to dwell together. The land of their sojournings could not support them because of their livestock. 8 So Esau settled in the hill country of Seir. (Esau is Edom.)
Gen 36:
Genesis 36:19–20 ESV
19 These are the sons of Esau (that is, Edom), and these are their chiefs. 20 These are the sons of Seir the Horite, the inhabitants of the land: Lotan, Shobal, Zibeon, Anah,
Genesis 36:31 ESV
31 These are the kings who reigned in the land of Edom, before any king reigned over the Israelites.
Gen 36.31
Genesis 36:43 ESV
43 Magdiel, and Iram; these are the chiefs of Edom (that is, Esau, the father of Edom), according to their dwelling places in the land of their possession.
Because God is faithful we must trust Him in difficulties = Patience
Circumstantial Difficulties
fleeing the land from Esau
Labor under Laban
Canaanite atack
Rachels labor
midwifes outlook
Relational Difficulties
People
Brother Esau
Causing and caught between wives
Father-in-law
Spiritual Difficulties
Esau
Laban
Rachel / Leah
Sons
Nations
The benefit for this is growth in patience.
It is connected with the names: Simeon, Levi, Dinah, Rachel, Reuben, and Bilhah. Then follows Isaac’s death, and afterwards Joseph’s disappearance; the famine, etc. Hence he says: “Few and evil have the days of the years of my life been” (ch. 47:9
Patience

It is connected with the names: Simeon, Levi, Dinah, Rachel, Reuben, and Bilhah. Then follows Isaac’s death, and afterwards Joseph’s disappearance; the famine, etc. Hence he says: “Few and evil have the days of the years of my life been” (ch. 47:9

John Peter Lange et al., A Commentary on the Holy Scriptures: Genesis (Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2008), 570.Patience

An enunciation of Jacob’s sorrows. It is connected with the names: Simeon, Levi, Dinah, Rachel, Reuben, and Bilhah. Then follows Isaac’s death, and afterwards Joseph’s disappearance; the famine, etc. Hence he says: “Few and evil have the days of the years of my life been” (ch. 47:9

Because God is faithful we must trust Him in disappointments = Perseverance
Self
Jacob decided on the journey that cost him his wife
Jacobs bad parenting lead to disobedient children
Others
Reuben
God
I followed You and this is what I get?
36:31 - Kings & Cheifs - we are mere shepherds!
Genesis 47:9 ESV
9 And Jacob said to Pharaoh, “The days of the years of my sojourning are 130 years. Few and evil have been the days of the years of my life, and they have not attained to the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their sojourning.”
Genesis 47:28–31 ESV
28 And Jacob lived in the land of Egypt seventeen years. So the days of Jacob, the years of his life, were 147 years. 29 And when the time drew near that Israel must die, he called his son Joseph and said to him, “If now I have found favor in your sight, put your hand under my thigh and promise to deal kindly and truly with me. Do not bury me in Egypt, 30 but let me lie with my fathers. Carry me out of Egypt and bury me in their burying place.” He answered, “I will do as you have said.” 31 And he said, “Swear to me”; and he swore to him. Then Israel bowed himself upon the head of his bed.
Genesis 48:15 ESV
15 And he blessed Joseph and said, “The God before whom my fathers Abraham and Isaac walked, the God who has been my shepherd all my life long to this day,
Acts 14:16 ESV
16 In past generations he allowed all the nations to walk in their own ways.
Genesis 49:29–33 ESV
29 Then he commanded them and said to them, “I am to be gathered to my people; bury me with my fathers in the cave that is in the field of Ephron the Hittite, 30 in the cave that is in the field at Machpelah, to the east of Mamre, in the land of Canaan, which Abraham bought with the field from Ephron the Hittite to possess as a burying place. 31 There they buried Abraham and Sarah his wife. There they buried Isaac and Rebekah his wife, and there I buried Leah— 32 the field and the cave that is in it were bought from the Hittites.” 33 When Jacob finished commanding his sons, he drew up his feet into the bed and breathed his last and was gathered to his people.
Hebrews 11:21 ESV
21 By faith Jacob, when dying, blessed each of the sons of Joseph, bowing in worship over the head of his staff.
The benefit for this is growth in perseverance.

God, indeed, permits the heathen to go their own way (Acts 14:16; Ps. 81:13), but is mindful of all his children (Acts 15:14 f.; 17:26

The promised seed is of slow growth. It is like the grain of mustard-seed (Matt. 13:31). The fulfilments of all God’s promises, of great blessings to his people, are always long in coming. But the kingdoms of this world would soon fade, while the kingdom of heaven will endure for ever (p. 147, 148).—A. G.

Because God is faithful we must trust Him in death = Peace
Others
Rebekah died while gone
35:8 - Deborah - Rebekah’s nurse dies
35:19 - Rachel dies - pilgrimage = 2 fold sense
35:29 - Isaac father died
Self
35:18a - soul departing
35:29 - gathered to his people
1 Corinthians 15:55 ESV
55 “O death, where is your victory? O death, where is your sting?”
Genesis 49:29–33 ESV
29 Then he commanded them and said to them, “I am to be gathered to my people; bury me with my fathers in the cave that is in the field of Ephron the Hittite, 30 in the cave that is in the field at Machpelah, to the east of Mamre, in the land of Canaan, which Abraham bought with the field from Ephron the Hittite to possess as a burying place. 31 There they buried Abraham and Sarah his wife. There they buried Isaac and Rebekah his wife, and there I buried Leah— 32 the field and the cave that is in it were bought from the Hittites.” 33 When Jacob finished commanding his sons, he drew up his feet into the bed and breathed his last and was gathered to his people.
Luke 20:37–38 ESV
37 But that the dead are raised, even Moses showed, in the passage about the bush, where he calls the Lord the God of Abraham and the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob. 38 Now he is not God of the dead, but of the living, for all live to him.”
1 Corinthians 15:55 ESV
55 “O death, where is your victory? O death, where is your sting?”
The benefit for this is growth in peace.
Expose the structure of the text.
Main points should support the theme.
points should follow textual sequence unless good reason to change.
use simple and clear transitions to give structure to movement.
Use verse references before quoting so that listeners can read along.
Use personal observances to illustrate difficult concepts.
CONCLUSION
Be brief.
Don’t introduce new material.
narrow the focus don’t expand it.
Clinch the goal.
Give concrete applications.
Goal
Application
Because God is faithful we should trust Him even when life hurts.
Choose to see your obstacles as opportunities.
CLOSE
To every matter there is a bright as well as a dark side. Rachel was overwhelmed with the sorrow of her own travail and death; Jacob, though weeping the mother’s loss, could see the mercy of the child’s birth. It is well for us if, while the flesh mourns over trials, our faith triumphs in divine faithfulness. Samson’s lion yielded honey, and so will our adversities, if rightly considered. The stormy sea feeds multitudes with its fishes; the wild wood blooms with beauteous florets; the stormy wind sweeps away the pestilence, and the biting frost loosens the soil. Dark clouds distil bright drops, and black earth grows gay flowers. A vein of good is to be found in every mine of evil. Sad hearts have peculiar skill in discovering the most disadvantageous point of view from which to gaze upon a trial; if there were only one slough in the world, they would soon be up to their necks in it, and if there were only one lion in the desert they would hear it roar. About us all there is a tinge of this wretched folly, and we are apt, at times, like Jacob, to cry, “All these things are against me.” Faith’s way of walking is to cast all care upon the Lord, and then to anticipate good results from the worst calamities. Like Gideon’s men, she does not fret over the broken pitcher, but rejoices that the lamp blazes forth the more. Out of the rough oyster-shell of difficulty she extracts the rare pearl of honour, and from the deep ocean-caves of distress she uplifts the priceless coral of experience. When her flood of prosperity ebbs, she finds treasures hid in the sands; and when her sun of delight goes down, she turns her telescope of hope to the starry promises of heaven. When death itself appears, faith points to the light of resurrection beyond the grave, thus making our dying Benoni to be our living Benjamin.
To every matter there is a bright as well as a dark side. Rachel was overwhelmed with the sorrow of her own travail and death; Jacob, though weeping the mother’s loss, could see the mercy of the child’s birth. It is well for us if, while the flesh mourns over trials, our faith triumphs in divine faithfulness. Samson’s lion yielded honey, and so will our adversities, if rightly considered. The stormy sea feeds multitudes with its fishes; the wild wood blooms with beauteous florets; the stormy wind sweeps away the pestilence, and the biting frost loosens the soil. Dark clouds distil bright drops, and black earth grows gay flowers. A vein of good is to be found in every mine of evil. Sad hearts have peculiar skill in discovering the most disadvantageous point of view from which to gaze upon a trial; if there were only one slough in the world, they would soon be up to their necks in it, and if there were only one lion in the desert they would hear it roar. About us all there is a tinge of this wretched folly, and we are apt, at times, like Jacob, to cry, “All these things are against me.” Faith’s way of walking is to cast all care upon the Lord, and then to anticipate good results from the worst calamities. Like Gideon’s men, she does not fret over the broken pitcher, but rejoices that the lamp blazes forth the more. Out of the rough oyster-shell of difficulty she extracts the rare pearl of honour, and from the deep ocean-caves of distress she uplifts the priceless coral of experience. When her flood of prosperity ebbs, she finds treasures hid in the sands; and when her sun of delight goes down, she turns her telescope of hope to the starry promises of heaven. When death itself appears, faith points to the light of resurrection beyond the grave, thus making our dying Benoni to be our living Benjamin.
To every matter there is a bright as well as a dark side. Rachel was overwhelmed with the sorrow of her own travail and death; Jacob, though weeping the mother’s loss, could see the mercy of the child’s birth. It is well for us if, while the flesh mourns over trials, our faith triumphs in divine faithfulness. Samson’s lion yielded honey, and so will our adversities, if rightly considered. The stormy sea feeds multitudes with its fishes; the wild wood blooms with beauteous florets; the stormy wind sweeps away the pestilence, and the biting frost loosens the soil. Dark clouds distil bright drops, and black earth grows gay flowers. A vein of good is to be found in every mine of evil. Sad hearts have peculiar skill in discovering the most disadvantageous point of view from which to gaze upon a trial; if there were only one slough in the world, they would soon be up to their necks in it, and if there were only one lion in the desert they would hear it roar. About us all there is a tinge of this wretched folly, and we are apt, at times, like Jacob, to cry, “All these things are against me.” Faith’s way of walking is to cast all care upon the Lord, and then to anticipate good results from the worst calamities. Like Gideon’s men, she does not fret over the broken pitcher, but rejoices that the lamp blazes forth the more. Out of the rough oyster-shell of difficulty she extracts the rare pearl of honour, and from the deep ocean-caves of distress she uplifts the priceless coral of experience. When her flood of prosperity ebbs, she finds treasures hid in the sands; and when her sun of delight goes down, she turns her telescope of hope to the starry promises of heaven. When death itself appears, faith points to the light of resurrection beyond the grave, thus making our dying Benoni to be our living Benjamin.
C. H. Spurgeon, Morning and Evening: Daily Readings (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1896).To every matter there is a bright as well as a dark side. Rachel was overwhelmed with the sorrow of her own travail and death; Jacob, though weeping the mother’s loss, could see the mercy of the child’s birth. It is well for us if, while the flesh mourns over trials, our faith triumphs in divine faithfulness. Samson’s lion yielded honey, and so will our adversities, if rightly considered. The stormy sea feeds multitudes with its fishes; the wild wood blooms with beauteous florets; the stormy wind sweeps away the pestilence, and the biting frost loosens the soil. Dark clouds distil bright drops, and black earth grows gay flowers. A vein of good is to be found in every mine of evil. Sad hearts have peculiar skill in discovering the most disadvantageous point of view from which to gaze upon a trial; if there were only one slough in the world, they would soon be up to their necks in it, and if there were only one lion in the desert they would hear it roar. About us all there is a tinge of this wretched folly, and we are apt, at times, like Jacob, to cry, “All these things are against me.” Faith’s way of walking is to cast all care upon the Lord, and then to anticipate good results from the worst calamities. Like Gideon’s men, she does not fret over the broken pitcher, but rejoices that the lamp blazes forth the more. Out of the rough oyster-shell of difficulty she extracts the rare pearl of honour, and from the deep ocean-caves of distress she uplifts the priceless coral of experience. When her flood of prosperity ebbs, she finds treasures hid in the sands; and when her sun of delight goes down, she turns her telescope of hope to the starry promises of heaven. When death itself appears, faith points to the light of resurrection beyond the grave, thus making our dying Benoni to be our living Benjamin.
C. H. Spurgeon, Morning and Evening: Daily Readings (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1896).
E.N.D.
Exalt God in relation to the Biblical truths that were just taught
Name the Biblical principles preached and ask God to help the local church body to obey these truths
Draw people to the cross of Christ by proclaiming hope and help in the person and work of Christ for salvation and sanctification
------------------------
COMMUNION
What it stands for
Warning
Communion Verses
COMMUNION TOGETHER
Fellowship With Each Other
Morning and Evening Evening, March 8

To every matter there is a bright as well as a dark side. Rachel was overwhelmed with the sorrow of her own travail and death; Jacob, though weeping the mother’s loss, could see the mercy of the child’s birth. It is well for us if, while the flesh mourns over trials, our faith triumphs in divine faithfulness. Samson’s lion yielded honey, and so will our adversities, if rightly considered. The stormy sea feeds multitudes with its fishes; the wild wood blooms with beauteous florets; the stormy wind sweeps away the pestilence, and the biting frost loosens the soil. Dark clouds distil bright drops, and black earth grows gay flowers. A vein of good is to be found in every mine of evil. Sad hearts have peculiar skill in discovering the most disadvantageous point of view from which to gaze upon a trial; if there were only one slough in the world, they would soon be up to their necks in it, and if there were only one lion in the desert they would hear it roar. About us all there is a tinge of this wretched folly, and we are apt, at times, like Jacob, to cry, “All these things are against me.” Faith’s way of walking is to cast all care upon the Lord, and then to anticipate good results from the worst calamities. Like Gideon’s men, she does not fret over the broken pitcher, but rejoices that the lamp blazes forth the more. Out of the rough oyster-shell of difficulty she extracts the rare pearl of honour, and from the deep ocean-caves of distress she uplifts the priceless coral of experience. When her flood of prosperity ebbs, she finds treasures hid in the sands; and when her sun of delight goes down, she turns her telescope of hope to the starry promises of heaven. When death itself appears, faith points to the light of resurrection beyond the grave, thus making our dying Benoni to be our living Benjamin.

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