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2 Chronicles 10-16

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Rehoboam (2 Chron 10-12)

Chapter 10:

Solomon’s son “Rehoboam went to Shechem” to be crowned ruler of Israel.
Chapter 10: Rehoboam (930–913 B.C.) succeeded his father, Solomon, and all Israel came to him. Jeroboam and all Israel appealed to Rehoboam to lighten the burden of taxation his father had levied. Rehoboam followed the poor advice of his young counselors by threatening to increase the load on the people. The northern tribes rebelled, ousting the king and his officials (10:16–19). This fulfilled Ahijah’s prophecy of God’s judgment against Solomon’s house (). The Chronicler probably omitted Jeroboam’s coronation because he did not consider Jeroboam or the later kings of the Northern Kingdom legitimate heirs to Israel’s throne because they rebelled against “the house of David” (10:19).
Jeroboam hears about this and decides to return to Egypt. If we remember from 1 Kings, some years before, Jeroboam I (“son of Nebat”) had been divinely anointed to be ruler over ten-twelfths of the nation of Israel (). It was because of this that he was “in Egypt,” having “fled from Solomon.”
Some years before, Jeroboam I (“son of Nebat”) had been divinely anointed to be ruler over ten-twelfths of the nation of Israel (). It was because of this that he was “in Egypt,” having “fled from Solomon.”
Jeroboam and all Israel appealed to Rehoboam to lighten the burden of taxation his father had levied. He wisely decided to take some time to think things over and to seek some counsel. He sought counsel from two groups of people. He first went to those who attended his father, and they gave him sound advice that he rejected. He then went to young men who he grew up with, men who were not as experienced. They gave him foolish advice that he decided to follow. When he gave all Israel his judgment that he was going to increase their burden, the northern tribes rebel against Rehoboam.
Solomon’s son “Rehoboam went to Shechem” to be crowned ruler of Israel.Rehoboam (930–913 B.C.) succeeded his father, Solomon, and all Israel came to him. Jeroboam and all Israel appealed to Rehoboam to lighten the burden of taxation his father had levied. Rehoboam followed the poor advice of his young counselors by threatening to increase the load on the people. The northern tribes rebelled, ousting the king and his officials (10:16–19). This fulfilled Ahijah’s prophecy of God’s judgment against Solomon’s house (). The Chronicler probably omitted Jeroboam’s coronation because he did not consider Jeroboam or the later kings of the Northern Kingdom legitimate heirs to Israel’s throne because they rebelled against “the house of David” (10:19).
The whole course of events “was from God” (v.15), who had, through his prophet “Ahijah the Shilonite” who had said that God was going to strip away much of the kingdom after Solomon’s time.
It is interesting that in this passage there is a lot of focus on David being the one the ten tribes rejected. They are rejecting David’s house. This brings to mind the fact that they are removing themselves from the blessings that God had promised his people in the covenant He had given to David. They are rejecting God’s "son.” They also will end up rejecting God’s temple and the city where He placed his name and desired to be worshipped when Jeroboam builds golden calves and places them in Dan & Bethel for worship. He also made some kind of “goat idols” for worship on the high places. Although these events came about because of God’s promise to split the nation, the northern tribes, led by Jeroboam, rebel against God’s law and are judged because of it.
Rehoboam followed the poor advice of his young counselors by threatening to increase the load on the people. The northern tribes rebelled, ousting the king and his officials (10:16–19).
This fulfilled Ahijah’s prophecy of God’s judgment against Solomon’s house (). The Chronicler probably omitted Jeroboam’s coronation because he did not consider Jeroboam or the later kings of the Northern Kingdom legitimate heirs to Israel’s throne because they rebelled against “the house of David” (10:19).
APPLICATION: Seek sound wisdom and be willing to listen to it! Rehoboam did the right thing in seeking wisdom from those older and more experienced than himself. He learned this fro his father’s proverbs. But he was foolish in deciding to listen to his own counselors instead.
APPLICATION: Seek sound wisdom and be willing to listen to it! Rehoboam did the right thing in seeking wisdom from those older and more experienced than himself. He learned this fro his father’s proverbs. But he was foolish in deciding to listen to his own counselors instead.

Chapter 11:

As had been prophesied by Ahijah (see 10:15; cf. ), only the two tribes of “Judah and Benjamin” remained loyal to the Davidic dynasty (vv.3, 12). It is from these two tribes that Rehoboam decided to mobilize troops in order to go and fight against Jeroboam so that he could get the tribes back under his rule. But the LORD sent Shemaiah to Rehoboam to command Rehoboam not to fight against the ten tribes. Rehoboam listened to what the LORD had commanded and returned to Judah.
Rehoboam then turned his attention to fortifying Judah’s cities (). The cities that are listed are believed to all be toward Judah’s southern and western borders. Their choice seems to have been dictated by threat from Egypt ().
Rehoboam then turned his attention to fortifying Judah’s cities (). Oppressed by Jeroboam, Levites and priests fled to Judah, where they strengthened Rehoboam’s kingdom (11:13–17). The strength of Rehoboam’s kingdom was also evidenced by the increasing size of his family (11:18–23).
When Jeroboam wanted to free the northern tribes from religious dependance on Judah, he oppressed the levites that lived in his territory, causing them to flee the land and to go to Judah. Then we are told in verses 16-17:
Those from every tribe of Israel who had determined in their hearts to seek the Lord their God followed the Levites to Jerusalem to sacrifice to the Lord, the God of their ancestors. So they strengthened the kingdom of Judah and supported Rehoboam son of Solomon for three years, because they walked in the ways of David and Solomon for three years. ()
Rehoboam’s kingdom grew stronger during this time, and the reason given here is that they “walked in the ways of David and Solomon.” The glory and the faithfulness of David and Solomon are used as an example for God’s people to live by for the first time here. If God’s people were willing to walk in the ways of David, then there would be blessing for the kingdom.
The strength of Rehoboam’s kingdom was also evidenced by the increasing size of his family (11:18–23). He had many wives and many sons through those wives.

Chapter 12:

But then, in chapter 12, things go downhill. Rehoboam and all His kingdom rejected the law of the LORD. Because of this, the LORD brought an enemy against them. Shishak, king of Egypt, invaded Judah and threatened the city of Jerusalem (12:1–4; ). Shishak ruled from Tanis (biblical Zoan). He was probably Pharaoh when Jeroboam went to Egypt to escape Solomon (). The Egyptian account of his invasion is recorded on the walls in the temple at Karnak (Thebes). There Shishak listed 150 cities captured in Israel and Judah, including the cities Rehoboam had fortified in the ch11.
Shishak ruled from Tanis (biblical Zoan). He was probably Pharaoh when Jeroboam went to Egypt to escape Solomon (). The Egyptian account of his invasion is recorded on the walls in the temple at Karnak (Thebes). There Shishak listed 150 cities captured in Israel and Judah.
Shishak, king of Egypt, invaded Judah and threatened the city of Jerusalem (12:1–4; ). Shishak ruled from Tanis (biblical Zoan). He was probably Pharaoh when Jeroboam went to Egypt to escape Solomon (). The Egyptian account of his invasion is recorded on the walls in the temple at Karnak (Thebes). There Shishak listed 150 cities captured in Israel and Judah. The prophet Shemaiah interpreted this invasion as God’s wrath because of Judah’s sin (12:5–8). Rehoboam paid a heavy price, including the temple treasuries and Solomon’s vast wealth. Because Rehoboam and the people humbled themselves, the Lord saved Jerusalem from total destruction (12:9–12). Rehoboam’s reign was remembered more for its years of warfare with Jeroboam (12:13–16).
The prophet Shemaiah interpreted this invasion as God’s wrath because of Judah’s sin (12:5–8). He told Rehoboam, “This is what the Lord says: ‘You have abandoned me; therefore, I have abandoned you to Shishak.’ ” Rehoboam paid a heavy price, including the temple treasuries and Solomon’s vast wealth. But it could have been worse than this if Rehoboam and His leaders had not humbled themselves. Because they humbled themselves, the Lord saved Jerusalem from total destruction (12:9–12).
“This is what the Lord says: ‘You have abandoned me; therefore, I have abandoned you to Shishak.’ ”Rehoboam paid a heavy price, including the temple treasuries and Solomon’s vast wealth.
Because Rehoboam and the people humbled themselves, the Lord saved Jerusalem from total destruction (12:9–12). Rehoboam’s reign was remembered more for its years of warfare with Jeroboam (12:13–16).
Chapter 12 closes by giving us an overview of Rehoboam’s reign (12:13-16).
APPLICATIONS:
Sin costs us dearly (12:5-8). The saying goes: “sin always takes you farther than you want to go. It will always keep you longer than you wanted to stay, and it will always cost you more than you intended to pay.” This is so true. Sin has the power to enslave and control us if we give into it. Sin can cost us our fellowship with God and one another. Sin will cost us our peace of mind and our peace with God. Ultimately, it will cost us our souls.
Repentance brings God’s favor (12:9-12). — “The sacrifice pleasing to God is a broken spirit. You will not despise a broken and humbled heart, God.”

Abijah (2 Chron 13:1-14:1)

Chapter 13:

Abijah, the son of Rehoboam, became king of Judah after his father. We have only one chapter giving us information about His reign. What is interesting about this chapter is that the Chronicler depicted Abijah’s reign in a more positive light than the author of Kings.
The one prominent event of his three-year reign was his war with Jeroboam. The Chronicler spends much more time talking about this event than the writer of Kings does, probably because of the speech that Abijah gives in this chapter to Jeroboam and Israel about the purposes of God and His choosing of David’s house. Remember that the Chronicler’s primary interest is in the development of God’s plans rather than the personal life or spiritual orientation of individual kings. Abijah is less important for his own sake than for what God did through him, which is why chapter 13 concentrates almost entirely on a single incident concerning “the kingdom of the Lord” (cf. v. 8).
The Chronicler’s primary interest is in the development of God’s plans rather than the personal life or spiritual orientation of individual kings. Abijah is less important for his own sake than for what God did through him, which is why chapter 13 concentrates almost entirely on a single incident concerning the kingdom of the Lord (cf. v. 8).
Abijah charged Jeroboam with apostasy, arguing that God had made a permanent bond with David’s descendants (), and he talks about the “gods” that Israel had brought to battle with them as well as their rejection of the LORD’s priests (). In contrast, Abijah defended Jerusalem’s worship because it was conducted by priests descended from Aaron as the Lord required (13:4–12). It is this reason why Abijah warns Jeroboam not to fight against him. He was confident the LORD was on His side. Look at verse 12, “Look, God and his priests are with us at our head. The trumpets are ready to sound the charge against you. Israelites, don’t fight against the Lord God of your ancestors, for you will not succeed.”
Look, God and his priests are with us at our head. The trumpets are ready to sound the charge against you. Israelites, don’t fight against the Lord God of your ancestors, for you will not succeed.”
The author of Kings condemned the reign of Abijah (), but the Chronicler depicted his reign in a more positive light. Using Iddo’s account (), he included Abijah’s sermon delivered before a battle against Jeroboam (13:1–3). Abijah charged Jeroboam with apostasy, arguing that God had made a permanent bond with David’s descendants (). He defended Jerusalem’s worship because it was conducted by priests descended from Aaron as the Lord required (13:4–12). The Lord “routed Jeroboam” (13:15), giving Judah a great victory because they trusted in the Lord.
But Jeroboam would not listen. He sent an ambush around to the rear of the army of Abijah so that he could fight them from two directions. When Judah realized they were pinned in, they cried to the LORD.
Probably using information from Iddo’s account (), he included Abijah’s sermon delivered before a battle against Jeroboam (13:1–3). Abijah charged Jeroboam with apostasy, arguing that God had made a permanent bond with David’s descendants (). He defended Jerusalem’s worship because it was conducted by priests descended from Aaron as the Lord required (13:4–12). The Lord “routed Jeroboam” (13:15), giving Judah a great victory because they trusted in the Lord.
The Lord “routed Jeroboam” (13:15) and handed them over to Judah. We are told that “The Judahites succeeded because they depended on the Lord, the God of their ancestors.”
He defended Jerusalem’s worship because it was conducted by priests descended from Aaron as the Lord required (13:4–12). The Lord “routed Jeroboam” (13:15), giving Judah a great victory because they trusted in the Lord.
The Judahites succeeded because they depended on the Lord, the God of their ancestors. .
APPLICATION: Victory comes to those who trust the Lord (13:18; 14:11). This is a consistent theme in Chronicles. What kind of victories could we have spiritually if we trusted in the LORD and remembered His word more than we do now?

Asa (2 Chron 14-16)

Chapter 14:

Asa became king in the place of his father Abijah. Verse two tells us, “Asa did what was good and right in the sight of the Lord his God.” That is always a good thing to hear at the beginning of a reign! Judah enjoyed the blessing of God because he removed the symbols of paganism (14:1–8; ) and commanded Judah to seek the LORD and to obey His commandments.
Asa did what was good and right in the sight of the Lord his God.” Judah enjoyed the blessing of God because he removed the symbols of paganism (14:1–8; ). The Cushite (Ethiopian) Zerah attacked Judah from the south, but Asa appealed to the Lord and won an impressive victory at Mareshah ().
In verse 8, The Cushites (Ethiopians), led by Zerah, attacked Judah from the south. Then we have recorded another great prayer of a descendant of David: “Lord, there is no one besides you to help the mighty and those without strength. Help us, Lord our God, for we depend on you, and in your name we have come against this large army. Lord, you are our God. Do not let a mere mortal hinder you.”
“Lord, there is no one besides you to help the mighty and those without strength. Help us, Lord our God, for we depend on you, and in your name we have come against this large army. Lord, you are our God. Do not let a mere mortal hinder you.”
Asa’s appeal to the Lord led to the LORD routing the enemy and giving Asa an impressive victory (). There were no survivors because the LORD was with them, and this victory brought the “terror of the LORD” in the region.

Chapter 15:

Asa’s second great period of reform (cf. 14:2–8, on his earlier efforts) occupies chapter 15. This reform was instigated by the prophet Azariah (15:1–7). Let’s read this prophecy (2-7):
So he went out to meet Asa and said to him, “Asa and all Judah and Benjamin, hear me. The Lord is with you when you are with him. If you seek him, he will be found by you, but if you abandon him, he will abandon you. For many years Israel has been without the true God (during the period of the judges?), without a teaching priest, and without instruction, but when they turned to the Lord God of Israel in their distress and sought him, he was found by them. In those times there was no peace for those who went about their daily activities because the residents of the lands had many conflicts. Nation was crushed by nation and city by city, for God troubled them with every possible distress. But as for you, be strong; don’t give up, for your work has a reward.” ()
It is unclear if there was sin involved here on Asa’s part. At the most, there could have been apathy towards whatever idolatry was left in Judah and toward’s the LORD’s temple. This prophecy sets a fire under him. He “took courage” and cleansed the land of idolatry. He renovated the altar of burnt offering, and he led Judah and those who defected from Israel to renew their covenant with the Lord not to follow after other gods (15:8–15).
Asa also removed the queen mother, Maacah, who had erected an Asherah pole (15:16; compare ). The Lord gave Judah peace and prosperity because of this ().
Asa removed idols and repaired the Lord’s altar. He led Judah to renew its covenant with the Lord not to follow after other gods (15:8–15). Asa also removed the queen mother, Maacah, who had erected an Asherah pole (15:16; compare ). The Lord gave Judah peace and prosperity ().
APPLICATION: “The Lord is with you when you are with him…” (15:2). If we turn away from God, we are being foolish if we think that God is going to continue to be pleased with us and act like nothing has happened. If we desire to be in fellowship with the LORD, we must continue to seek him and love Him.

Chapter 16:

In the 36th year of Asa’s reign, his dependance on the LORD faltered. When the threat of war with King Baasha of Israel came, he brought out the silver and gold from the temple treasuries and from his palace to get help from another nation - from King Ben-hadad of Aram.
The prophet Hanani rebuked Asa because he relied on Aram rather than the Lord. He reminded him of past victories that the LORD had given him when he trusted in the LORD. But Asa didn’t listen to Hanani. In anger, Asa imprisoned Hanani and oppressed the people ().
God chastened Judah with continued warfare, and Asa experienced a debilitating foot disease. Even with this disease, he did not seek the LORD. He merely trusted in the physicians. When Asa died, his funeral was an elaborate spectacle (16:11–14; compare ).
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