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Introduction

R-Value of Construction Materials
R-Value of Construction Materials
In construction, different materials are given what’s called an “R-Value” to determine it’s ability to resist heat transfer from one side to the other. The higher the R-Value a material is given, the better it is at providing insulation. R-Value’s can also be added together, if multiple substances are attached to each other. For example, if one substance with an R-Value of 3 is attached to another substance with an R-Value of 1.4, the total R-Value for the two substances would be 3+1.4=4.4.
In construction, different materials are given what’s called an “R-Value” to determine it’s ability to resist heat transfer from one side to the other. The higher the R-Value a material is given, the better it is at providing insulation. R-Value’s can also be added together, if multiple substances are attached to each other. For example, if one substance with an R-Value of 3 is attached to another substance with an R-Value of 1.4, the total R-Value for the two substances would be 3+1.4=4.4.
Now, there are plenty of materials that have been given R-Values that are used in the construction trade. Some examples of common materials would include but are not limited to: plywood (given an R-Value of 1.25 at 1’’), fiber board sheathing (given an R-Value of 1.32 at 1/2’’), common brick (given an R-Value of .80 at 4’’), hardwood flooring (given an R-Value of .68 at 3/4’’), asphalt shingles (given an R-Value of .44 for the average size shingle), and wood doors with a solid core (given an R-Value of 2.17 at 1/34’’).
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