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But he was a Leper

But he was a leper- 1st logos sermon  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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leprecy is terrible, sin is terrible- jesus heals, jesus forgives

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Experiencing Jesus -

a man with leprosy. Matthew’s first story is about a leper who was healed by Jesus (cf. Mark 1:40–44; Luke 5:12–14). Lepers were social and religious outcasts in biblical times. Leprosy in the Bible can refer to a variety of skin problems and should not be equated with the dreaded modern malady known as leprosy (Hansen’s disease). Even garments could become “leprous” (Lev 13:47–59). In all these cases, the priests were responsible to make official rulings on the ritual status of the questionable individual, impurity or uncleanness versus purity or cleanness. They were to quarantine questionable individuals until their status became clear. Lepers were not permitted any social contact with other Israelites but were to shout warnings of their impurity to those who might come near them (Lev 13:45–46). As such, this leper was rather audacious even to approach Jesus (contrast Luke 17:12) and to request cleansing, although his posture, his calling Jesus “Lord” (See the discussion under Christology in the Major Themes section of the Introduction.), and his confidence in Jesus’ power indicate his great respect for Jesus (8:2). Although this leper’s faith is striking, the next story involves even greater faith. (For the OT background on leprosy see Lev 13–14; Num 12:10–15; 2 Kgs 5 [cf. Luke 4:27]; 2 Chr 26. In the Gospels see Matt 8:2–3; 10:8; 11:5; 26:6; Mark 1:40–42; 14:3; Luke 4:27; 5:12–13; 7:22; 17:12. See also m. Negai’m.)

Life Application Bible Commentary, Matthew Jesus Heals a Man with Leprosy / 8:1–4 / 38

8:1 When he came down from the mountainside, large crowds followed him. In 5:1 we read that Jesus “saw the crowds … [and] went up on a mountainside” in order to teach them. After finishing his “Sermon on the Mount” (recorded in chapters 5–7), Jesus came down from the mountainside. Whenever we see Jesus, we usually see large crowds following him. The people were astonished at Jesus’ authority in his teaching (7:28–29); it captivated them, so they followed him to see and hear more.

8:2 A man with leprosy came and knelt before him and said, “Lord, if you are willing, you can make me clean.” Leprosy, like AIDS today, was a terrifying disease because there was no known cure. In Jesus’ day, the Greek word for “leprosy” was used for a variety of similar skin diseases, and some forms were contagious. If a person contracted the contagious type, a priest declared him a leper and banished him from his home and city. This also excluded him from participating in any social or religious activities (according to the law in Leviticus 13–14). The leper went to live in a community with other lepers until he either got better or died. This was the only way the people knew to contain the spread of the contagious forms of leprosy.

This man took a great risk when he came and knelt before Jesus. The word for “knelt” can also mean “worshiped.” His kneeling reveals his desperation, humility, and recognition of Jesus’ authority. His words to Jesus reveal his faith. If his disease were to disappear, a priest could declare him clean (or cured), but only Jesus could make him clean.

The words “if you are willing” reveal the man’s faith in Jesus’ authority in this matter of healing; Jesus’ ability was never in question. This man wanted to be clean—a huge request. The man wanted to become a person again, to be reunited with his family and community. He knew Jesus could do it. He apparently had heard of Jesus’ healing power (see 4:24). The question was, would Jesus heal him?

POINT OF NEED

The leper’s actions and words expressed his complete reliance upon Christ. This leper was a broken person. He may not have fully understood who Jesus was, but he regarded Jesus as his source of hope. Perhaps the leper had just stood at a distance, straining to listen to parts of the Sermon on the Mount. He must have thought that surely a man with such powerful words from God might also wield God’s power to heal. The leper wanted so badly to be clean.

This desperate man had a point of need; a part of his life was clearly beyond his control. God often uses our point of need as the place in which to make himself known. Until we honestly cry, “Help,” any knowledge we have about God will be incomplete. Our point of need may be physical illness, loneliness, or the defeat of recurring sin. God can use that need to make us aware of our deeper need for him.

Has God used your need to draw your attention to himself? Have you turned to him? Let your trust in God deepen as you honestly confess your need to him.

8:3 Jesus reached out his hand and touched the man. “I am willing,” he said. “Be clean!” Jesus’ love and power work together. Matthew revealed Jesus’ heart of compassion. All people shunned lepers, but Jesus reached out his hand and touched this man covered with a dreaded, contagious disease. That Jesus’ touch precedes his pronouncement of healing indicates his sovereignty over the Jewish law not to touch a leper (Leviticus 5:3; 13:1–46; Numbers 5:2). In touching the leper, Jesus became “unclean.” He did not worry about becoming ritually unclean when there was a genuine need.

When Jesus answered the man, I am willing, he showed his willingness and ability to meet this social outcast’s most basic need. With the words “Be clean,” the leprosy immediately disappeared. The words and the touch were simple but effective, revealing Jesus’ divine authority over sickness.

Immediately he was cured of his leprosy. When Jesus spoke the words, the leper was cured immediately. We do not know the stage of this man’s leprosy—he may have already lost portions of his body to the disease. But when Jesus spoke, the man’s health was restored completely and instantly. The man had his life back; he could return to his community, to his family, and to the synagogue.

TELL AND SHOW

Jesus’ touch communicated both to the leper and to the watching people. What communicates with people? What gets through? What cracks the crust and reaches a person beneath the surface?

If all we do is speak (preach or witness), many people will wonder if our words carry much weight. Having words without work seems cheap. Most people prefer the words of someone whose life they trust, and trust requires a tangible demonstration of a person’s values.

If all we do is work (touch people with good deeds), many will wonder what all the effort means. Works accomplished but never celebrated may add health or comfort to a person’s life (and this is important), but in the end, for what higher purpose?

Jesus speaks and touches, and so should we. In your actions, you show the love of God. In your words, you celebrate God by answering the how and the why questions connected with your service. For Jesus’ sake, tell others about him, and show others how much you care.

8:4 Then Jesus said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone; but go, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.” N Jesus healed the man, but also gave him two warnings: First, see that you say nothing to anyone. The warning was an earnest and forceful admonition—words that Jesus commanded the man to obey. But why would Jesus ask this man not to tell anyone about his healing? Wouldn’t this have been great advertising for Jesus, bringing more people to hear his message? While we might think so, Jesus knew better (John 2:24–25). Jesus’ mission was to preach the Good News of the kingdom of God. He did not want the crowds descending on him to see miracles or to benefit from his power. Such people would not be receptive to hear and to respond to the gospel. Jesus did not want to be a miracle worker in a sideshow; he wanted to be the Savior of their souls. This verse and others in Matthew (9:30; 12:16; 16:20; 17:9) have been referred to as the “messianic secret,” meaning that Jesus wished to keep his full messiahship hidden until after the Resurrection. Different reasons have been given, such as that Jesus did not want to arouse political messianic expectations or that Jesus wouldn’t accept the full acclamation until he finished his saving work on the cross. Most likely, there were several and different reasons for each situation. Here perhaps the obvious meaning is that the cleansed man would not be distracted by talking to people until he followed the law and went to the priest.

The law required a priest to examine a healed leper (Leviticus 14). Then the healed leper was to give an offering at the temple, called the guilt offering in Leviticus 14:12. Jesus adhered to these laws by sending the man to the priest, thereby demonstrating high regard for God’s law. Jesus wanted this man to give his story firsthand to the priest to prove that his leprosy was completely gone so that he could be restored to his family and community. This would be a testimony to them.

Some think that “them” refers to the priests. Jesus would show the religious authorities that he was not anti-law, but the only one who could truly fulfill the law. If the priest declared that the healing had taken place but refused to accept the person and power of Christ who had done it, that priest would be condemned by the evidence. On the other hand, Jesus may have intended the testimony to be a positive one to the people who witnessed the healing. Jesus’ meaning would be, “Don’t you proclaim it. Instead, let the priest’s pronouncement witness for me and for the healing.” The priest’s words would testify to everyone that the man had recovered and that Jesus did not condemn the law. Most important, however, the testimony would reveal that the one who heals lepers had come. People believed that healing leprosy was a sign of the Messiah’s arrival (see 11:5).

Mark records that the man disobeyed Jesus’ warning and “went out and began to talk freely, spreading the news. As a result, Jesus could no longer enter a town openly but stayed outside in lonely places” (see Mark 1:45 NIV).

saul who became Paul had religion, but he didnt have a relationship with Jesus

testimonys will only take us so far- Many of us when we cae to christ we came based off of someoneles testimony- they said he was good, loving compassionate, the preacher said that Jesus loved me, - but we must have our own experience-

saul who became Paul had religion, but he didnt have a relationship with Jesus

8 When He had come down from the mountain, great multitudes followed Him. 2 And behold, a leper came and worshiped Him, saying, “Lord, if You are willing, You can make me clean.”

3 Then Jesus put out His hand and touched him, saying, “I am willing; be cleansed.” Immediately his leprosy was cleansed.

4 And Jesus said to him, “See that you tell no one; but go your way, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.”

3 Then Jesus put out His hand and touched him, saying, “I am willing; be cleansed.” Immediately his leprosy was cleansed.
testimony’s will only take us so far- Many of us when we came to Christ we came based off of someone testimony- they said he was good, loving compassionate, the preacher said that Jesus loved me, - but we must have our own experience-
4 And Jesus said to him, “See that you tell no one; but go your way, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.”
Saul who became Paul had religion, but he didn’t have a relationship with Jesus

8 When He had come down from the mountain, great multitudes followed Him. 2 And behold, a leper came and worshiped Him, saying, “Lord, if You are willing, You can make me clean.”

3 Then Jesus put out His hand and touched him, saying, “I am willing; be cleansed.” Immediately his leprosy was cleansed.

4 And Jesus said to him, “See that you tell no one; but go your way, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.”

nkjv
8 When He had come down from the mountain, great multitudes followed Him. 2 And behold, a leper came and worshiped Him, saying, “Lord, if You are willing, You can make me clean.”
3 Then Jesus put out His hand and touched him, saying, “I am willing; be cleansed.” Immediately his leprosy was cleansed.
4 And Jesus said to him, “See that you tell no one; but go your way, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.”
8:1 When He had come down from the mountain, great multitudes followed Him .
In we read that Jesus “saw the crowds …went up on a mountainside and began preaching “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are those who mourn for they shall be comforted. Blessed are the meek for they shall inherit the earth. Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness for they shall be filled.
After finishing his “Sermon on the Mount, Jesus comes down from the mountainside. From that point on everytime we see Jesus, we usually see large crowds following him. The people were astonished at Jesus’ authority in his teaching (7:28–29); it captivated them, so they followed him to see and hear more.
8:2 And behold, a leper came and worshiped Him, saying, “Lord, if You are willing, You can make me clean.”
Leprosy, like AIDS today, was a terrifying disease because there was no known cure. In that day the Greek word for “leprosy” was used for a variety of similar skin diseases, and some forms were contagious.
If a person contracted the contagious type, a priest declared him a leper and banished him from his home and city. Lepers were excluded from participating in any social or religious activities They priests had the authority to look at you and declare you clean or unclean, they could could not help you, they could not heal you, theywould only look at you, and judge you according to the laws of mos. To be declared a leper by a priest was horrifying, you were left condemned in isolation and hoplessness.
Turner, D., & Bock, D. L. (2005). Corners This also excluded him from participating in any social or religious activities (according to the law in ). The leper went to live in a community with other lepers until he either got better or died. Lepers were social and religious outcasts
In old testament times leprosy and any form of sickness were always viewed as a result of some form of sin.
Job in the story of Job - job loses everything-job is covered in sores- his own firends accuse him of doing evil. they said job you must have some hidden sin-God will not reject a blameless person nor take the hand of evildoers. but God sad he was blameless and upright.
Job-
there was a man who was blind from birth, and his disciples asked Jesus who sinned him or his parents? and Jesus said neither-
in the old testament sickness or leprosy was always viewed by “”” as a symbol of some form of sin.
(according to the law in ). Because of this disease of leprosy,once declared unclean by a priest, a leper would be seperated from the people, and would have live in a community with other lepers until he either got better or died.
Lepers were social and religious outcast, and were not allowed any social contact with other Israelites, they were required to shout warnings of their impurity to those who might come near them
The leper was taking a great risk to even approach Jesus. But Jesus is always approachable.
Turner, D., & Bock, D. L. (2005). Cornerstone biblical commentary, Vol 11: Matthew and Mark (p. 123). Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers.
roach Jesus.
I can imagine the Leper condemned by the law, condemned by the church, condemned by the religious. seeng a crowd moving through the town, and the leper maintaining his distance shouts to to the people- who is it?
and someone shouts back its Jesus!
leper- I know i shouldn't, i know im to filthy, i know im unclean, i know its not lawful,but wonder if he will do for me what hes done for others. I wonder if he can heal me, i wonder if he can make me clean, ive
apply- dont let anything keep you from coming to Jesus, dont let sin, or snares or weights,/religious person/church,addiction,diseases. dont let anything keep you from coming to Jesus.
Jesus said come to me- come in your perversion , come in your addiction, come how you are
Jesus said
jesus said- The spirit of the Lord is upon me, to preach the gospel to the poor, he has sent me to heal the broken hearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and recovery of sight to the blind, To set qt liberty those who are oppressed. To proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord.
"
Come as you are-
“Though your ins are like scarlet, they shall be white as snow, though they are red like crimson they shall be as wool”
the leper shouted who is it? and they said its Jesus, and the leper makes his way through the crowd, prostrates himself in his sickness......and says if you are willing.make me clean
aand says if you are willing.
and His words reveal his faith....If his disease were to disappear, a priest could look him over and declare him clean, but only Jesus our high priest could make him clean.
i His words to Jesus reveal his faith. If his disease were to disappear, a priest could declare him clean (or cured), but only Jesus could make him clean.
The words “if you are willing” reveal the man’s faith in Jesus’. he knew he could, the question was never are you able, but will you?
This man wanted to be clean—He wanted to be free from this bondage. He wanted to become a person again, to be reunited with his family and community.
He knew Jesus could do it. He had heard of the healing power of Jesus. He had heard he opened blind eyes, he had healed others, he had broken chains of bondage, chains of addiction, chains of sickness, and disease, and sin
people who have been delivered from .....addiction, pornography, drugs alcohol, unbelief, doubt anxiety, worry, bitterness,un- forgiveness, I've heard their testimonys, i know hes freed others, but will he do it for me?
sin like leprocy is horific disease- its contagious, its like a cancer that grows untill it kills you-
sin
romans
Then jesus put out his hand and touched him, sayingI am willing.
the word touched here comes form the greek word Hapto- (opto rymes with auto) to touch firmly or grasp with the hands, he embraced him!
8:4 Then Jesus said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone; but go, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.” Jesus healed the man, but he also gave him two warnings: First, see that you say nothing to anyone. The warning was an earnest and forceful admonition—words that Jesus commanded the man to obey. But why would Jesus ask this man not to tell anyone about his healing?
POINT OF NEED
The leper’s actions and words expressed his complete reliance upon Christ. This leper was a broken person. He may not have fully understood who Jesus was, but he regarded Jesus as his source of hope.
Perhaps the leper had just stood at a distance, straining to listen to parts of the Sermon on the Mount. He must have thought that surely a man with such powerful words from God might also wield God’s power to heal. The leper wanted so badly to be clean.
This desperate man had a point of need; a part of his life was clearly beyond his control.
God often uses our point of need as the place in which to make himself known. Until we honestly cry, “Help,” any knowledge we have about God will be incomplete. Our point of need may be physical illness, loneliness, or the defeat of recurring sin.
Has God used your need to draw your attention to himself? Have you turned to him? Let your trust in God deepen as you honestly confess your need to him.
8:3 Jesus reached out his hand and touched the man. “I am willing,” he said. “Be clean!”
I am willing! It was His willingness, & not his touch, was that was needed for the healing . but the touch was probably the first human contact the leper had experienced throughout the duration of his illness. Touching the leper was even more audacious than the leper’s approaching Jesus, since Jesus would also became ritually unclean when he touched the leper (). But the touch, instead of defiling Jesus, immediately cleansed the leper.
All people shunned lepers, but Jesus reached out his hand and touched this man covered with a dreaded, contagious disease. That Jesus’ touch precedes his pronouncement of healing indicates his sovereignty over the Jewish law not to touch a leper (Leviticus 5:3; 13:1–46; Numbers 5:2). In touching the leper, Jesus became “unclean.” He did not worry about becoming ritually unclean when there was a genuine need.
reached out his hand and touched this man covered with a dreaded, contagious disease. That Jesus’ touch precedes his pronouncement of healing indicates his sovereignty over the Jewish law not to touch a leper (Leviticus 5:3; 13:1–46; Numbers 5:2). In touching the leper, Jesus became “unclean.” He did not worry about becoming ritually unclean when there was a genuine need.
When Jesus answered the man, I am willing, he showed his willingness and ability to meet this social outcast’s most basic need. With the words “Be clean,” the leprosy immediately disappeared. The words and the touch were simple but effective, revealing Jesus’ divine authority over sickness.
When Jesus answered the man, I am willing, he showed his willingness and ability to meet this social outcast’s most basic need. With the words “Be clean,” the leprosy immediately disappeared. The words and the touch were simple but effective, revealing Jesus’ divine authority over sickness.
Immediately he was cured of his leprosy. When Jesus spoke the words, the leper was cured immediately. We do not know the stage of this man’s leprosy—he may have already lost portions of his body to the disease. But when Jesus spoke, the man’s health was restored completely and instantly. The man had his life back; he could return to his community, to his family, and to the synagogue.
Wouldn’t this have been great advertising for Jesus, bringing more people to hear his message? While we might think so, Jesus knew better ().
TELL AND SHOW
Jesus’ touch communicated both to the leper and to the watching people. What communicates with people? What gets through? What cracks the crust and reaches a person beneath the surface?
If all we do is speak (preach or witness), many people will wonder if our words carry much weight. Having words without work seems cheap. Most people prefer the words of someone whose life they trust, and trust requires a tangible demonstration of a person’s values.
Jesus’ mission was to preach the Good News of the kingdom of God. He did not want the crowds descending on him to see miracles or to benefit from his power. Such people would not be receptive to hear and to respond to the gospel. Jesus did not want to be a miracle worker in a sideshow; he wanted to be the Savior of their souls.
If all we do is work (touch people with good deeds), many will wonder what all the effort means. Works accomplished but never celebrated may add health or comfort to a person’s life (and this is important), but in the end, for what higher purpose?
and thats still the case today- he wants to save us-
Jesus speaks and touches, and so should we. In your actions, you show the love of God. In your words, you celebrate God by answering the how and the why questions connected with your service. For Jesus’ sake, tell others about him, and show others how much you care.
healings are good, miracles are good, btutheir is no greater gift than the gift of salvation.
jesus preached the good news, and he calls us to do the same-
Jesus said Go into all the world and preach the gospel.
Jesus told the leper to tell no one and he told everyone, he tells us to tell everyone and we tell no one
The Upside down Church 1. The Gospel Doesn’t Need Our Help

1. The gospel doesn’t need our help

I am amazed time and time again when people say, “Greg, what are you going to preach on this year at the crusade?”

“Same thing I preached last year. I am going to preach the gospel.”

“What is your text?”

“The text may be different. The illustrations may be different. But it is going to be the same message.”

“Yeah, but what about the Generation Xers? How are you going to communicate with them?”

Well, God doesn’t change the basic truths according to who’s attending the crusade. And God’s Holy Spirit can convince anyone—Gen Xers included—that they need to be saved from their sins. If we tell the truth, God will use it.

2. The most effective message is a simple one

Someone once asked the great British preacher C. H. Spurgeon if he could put in a few words what his Christian faith was all about. Spurgeon said, “I will put it into four words for you. Christ died for me.”

It’s as simple as that. Christ died for me. That is the essence of the gospel message. I love the way the apostle Paul said that God “loved me and gave himself for me” (Gal. 2:20, NIV).

The law required a priest to examine a healed leper (). Then the healed leper was to give an offering at the temple, called the guilt offering in . Jesus adhered to these laws by sending the man to the priest, thereby demonstrating high regard for God’s law. Jesus wanted this man to give his story firsthand to the priest to prove that his leprosy was completely gone so that he could be restored to his family and community. This would be a testimony to them.
the leper would be restored to his family and his home, and through the cross of Jesus, the ultimate sacrafice too are restored.....and out testimony will lead others to him.
8:4 Then Jesus said to him, “See that you say nothing to anyone; but go, show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.” N Jesus healed the man, but also gave him two warnings: First, see that you say nothing to anyone. The warning was an earnest and forceful admonition—words that Jesus commanded the man to obey. But why would Jesus ask this man not to tell anyone about his healing? Wouldn’t this have been great advertising for Jesus, bringing more people to hear his message? While we might think so, Jesus knew better (John 2:24–25). Jesus’ mission was to preach the Good News of the kingdom of God. He did not want the crowds descending on him to see miracles or to benefit from his power. Such people would not be receptive to hear and to respond to the gospel. Jesus did not want to be a miracle worker in a sideshow; he wanted to be the Savior of their souls. This verse and others in Matthew (9:30; 12:16; 16:20; 17:9) have been referred to as the “messianic secret,” meaning that Jesus wished to keep his full messiahship hidden until after the Resurrection. Different reasons have been given, such as that Jesus did not want to arouse political messianic expectations or that Jesus wouldn’t accept the full acclamation until he finished his saving work on the cross. Most likely, there were several and different reasons for each situation. Here perhaps the obvious meaning is that the cleansed man would not be distracted by talking to people until he followed the law and went to the priest.
The law required a priest to examine a healed leper (). Then the healed leper was to give an offering at the temple, called the guilt offering in . Jesus adhered to these laws by sending the man to the priest, thereby demonstrating high regard for God’s law. Jesus wanted this man to give his story firsthand to the priest to prove that his leprosy was completely gone so that he could be restored to his family and community. This would be a testimony to them.
see had the leper not first heard that jesus could, he never would have come to see if he would.
your testimony will lead others to find their own.
we dont need more religion, we need more Jesus- we need to experience his healing power, his loving embrace, and we too will be transfored-
Paul said i want to know Jesus-
(NKJV)
Yet indeed I also count all things loss for the excellence of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them as rubbish, that I may gain Christ 9 and be found in Him, not having my own righteousness, which is from the law, but that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which is from God by faith; 10 that I may know Him and the power of His resurrection, and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death, 11 if, by any means, I may attain to the resurrection from the dead.
Yet indeed I also count all things loss for the excellence of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them as rubbish, that I may gain Christ 9 and be found in Him, not having my own righteousness, which is from the law, but that which is through faith in Christ, the righteousness which is from God by faith; 10 that I may know Him and the power of His resurrection, and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death, 11 if, by any means, I may attain to the resurrection from the dead.
doubting Thomas-
Seeing and Believing24 Now Thomas, called the Twin, one of the twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. 25 The other disciples therefore said to him, “We have seen the Lord.”So he said to them, “Unless I see in His hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and put my hand into His side, I will not believe.”26 And after eight days His disciples were again inside, and Thomas with them. Jesus came, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, “Peace to you!” 27 Then He said to Thomas, “Reach your finger here, and look at My hands; and reach your hand here, and put it into My side. Do not be unbelieving, but believing.”28 And Thomas answered and said to Him, “My Lord and my God!”29 Jesus said to him, “Thomas,[a] because you have seen Me, you have believed. Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed
Some think that “them” refers to the priests. Jesus would show the religious authorities that he was not anti-law, but the only one who could truly fulfill the law. If the priest declared that the healing had taken place but refused to accept the person and power of Christ who had done it, that priest would be condemned by the evidence. On the other hand, Jesus may have intended the testimony to be a positive one to the people who witnessed the healing. Jesus’ meaning would be, “Don’t you proclaim it. Instead, let the priest’s pronouncement witness for me and for the healing.” The priest’s words would testify to everyone that the man had recovered and that Jesus did not condemn the law. Most important, however, the testimony would reveal that the one who heals lepers had come. People believed that healing leprosy was a sign of the Messiah’s arrival (see 11:5).
Mark records that the man disobeyed Jesus’ warning and “went out and began to talk freely, spreading the news. As a result, Jesus could no longer enter a town openly but stayed outside in lonely places” (see Mark 1:45 niv).[1]
He was bound he was in his …
1. Lepercy
2. Isolation
3. Religion
4.
Laws of Religion* fear of what would He was in bondage to what
For you did not receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption by whom we cry out, “Abba, Father.”
—Romans 8:15, nkjv
Bondage means slavery. The spirit of bondage causes legalism, which promotes salvation by works instead of grace. This includes bondage to rules, regulations, and the traditions of men. The spirit of bondage causes fear of backsliding and fear of losing salvation.
• Bondage to man: Fear of man brings one into bondage (Prov. 29:25). “By whom a person is overcome, by him also he is brought into bondage” (2 Pet. 2:19, nkjv). Whether bondage to false teachers, prophets, or apostles (2 Cor. 11:13), soul ties need to be broken and spirits cast out (mind control, fear, deception, witchcraft).
• Bondage to organizations, lodges, cults, etc.: This type of bondage occurs through oaths, pledges, and vows to organizations or lodges such as Masons, Eastern Star, fraternities, sororities, cults, and clubs. Oaths bind the soul (Num. 30:2), and our souls need to be free to love the Lord (Matt. 22:37). These organizations have an effect on the soul even after one has left. Soul ties need to be broken and these organizations renounced.
• Bondage to self: We are told to deny ourselves (Mark 8:34). In order to be delivered from self, we must focus our attention on Jesus—“It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me” (Gal. 2:20). This bondage to self manifests in selfishness and preoccupation with self. Spirits of self include self-awareness, self-love, self condemnation, self-pity, self-consciousness, self-reward, self-deception, self-rejection, self-defense, self-torture, self-dependence, self-praise, self-destruction, selfishness, self-righteousness, and self-hatred.[2]
altar the leper worshiped him,miracles often begins with worship.
paul and silas-
healing comes through worship
lets worship him!
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