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2 Chronicles 1-5

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A Continuation of 1 Chronicles

2 Chronicles: An Introduction and Commentary F. Solomon Prepares for the Temple (2 Chr. 1:1–2:18)

Despite the break between 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles, the account of Solomon basically continues the story of David. The reigns of the two kings are really a single unit, as Solomon’s involvement in David’s temple preparations has illustrated (1 Chr. 22, 28–29).

Despite the break between 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles, the account of Solomon basically continues the story of David. The reigns of the two kings are really a single unit, as Solomon’s involvement in David’s temple preparations has illustrated (, ).
David son of Jesse was king over all Israel. The length of his reign over Israel was forty years; he reigned in Hebron for seven years and in Jerusalem for thirty-three. He died at a good old age, full of days, riches, and honor, and his son Solomon became king in his place. As for the events of King David’s reign, from beginning to end, note that they are written in the Events of the Seer Samuel, the Events of the Prophet Nathan, and the Events of the Seer Gad, along with all his reign, his might, and the incidents that affected him and Israel and all the kingdoms of the surrounding lands. ()

26 David son of Jesse was king over all Israel. 27 The length of his reign over Israel was forty years; he reigned in Hebron for seven years and in Jerusalem for thirty-three. 28 He died at a good old age, full of days, riches, and honor, and his son Solomon became king in his place. 29 As for the events of King David’s reign, from beginning to end, note that they are written in the Events of the Seer Samuel, the Events of the Prophet Nathan, and the Events of the Seer Gad, 30 along with all his reign, his might, and the incidents that affected him and Israel and all the kingdoms of the surrounding lands.

Despite the break between 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles, the account of Solomon basically continues the story of David. The reigns of the two kings are really a single unit, as Solomon’s involvement in David’s temple preparations has illustrated (, ).
Despite the break between 1 Chronicles and 2 Chronicles, the account of Solomon basically continues the story of David. The reigns of the two kings are really a single unit, as Solomon’s involvement in David’s temple preparations has illustrated (, ).
There are some themes that continue into Solomon’s reign in 2 Chronicles:
The sense of partnership continues here, particularly in several passages unique to Chronicles where David is linked with Solomon (e.g. 2:3, 7; 3:1; 6:42; 7:10; 8:14).
Inquiring of God - we see this right away in the book as Solomon worships God…
The way the Davidic covenant is developed (), with Solomon fulfilling the next stage of God’s promises by ascending David’s throne and building the temple (especially ; cf. also 1:8–9; 5:4–11; 6:14–17; 7:17–18). The covenant theme in fact underlies Chronicles’ entire presentation of Solomon.
David is STILL a key figure of the rest of the Chronicler’s history. He has been lifted up as the standard for kingship and for trust in the LORD. He is mentioned over 70 times in 2 Chronicles.
the way the Davidic covenant is developed (), with Solomon fulfilling the first stage of God’s promises by ascending David’s throne and building the temple (especially ; cf. also 1:8–9; 5:4–11; 6:14–17; 7:17–18). The covenant theme in fact underlies Chronicles’ entire presentation of Solomon
God is the emphasis - The building of His temple and His fulfilling the promises he gave to David take center stage. The Chronicler is much more concerned with Solomon’s significance in the purposes of God than listing the major events of Solomon’s life. It is for this reason that Chronicles has left out many important features found in the Kings account, such as Solomon’s personal details. Included in the omissions are not only the negative aspects like his polygamy, his idolatry, and his military disasters, but also many of the good things that he did as king.
Genesis 1:1 CSB
In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.
The first section of 2 Chronicles (chs 1-9) are about Solomon and His building of the temple. They can be
It is for this reason that Chronicles has left out many important features found in the Kings account, such as Solomon’s personal details. Included in the omissions are not only the negative aspects like his polygamy, his idolatry, and his military disasters

At the close of 1 Chronicles (9:23–30) Solomon is presented as sitting on the Lord’s throne as king in place of David, his father, while the officials, the warriors, and King David’s sons pledged submission to him.
We are told that Solomon “established himself firmly”/strengthened his hold” on the throne over all Israel. The expression translated “established himself firmly” frequently is found where the new king assumed power after a time of difficulty (; ; ; ). Despite problems at the time of his accession, Solomon experienced help from the Lord (cf. , ; ).
Then as we come to , we are told that Solomon “established himself firmly”/strengthened his hold” on the throne over all Israel. The expression translated “established himself firmly” frequently is found where the new king assumed power after a time of difficulty (; ; ; ). Despite problems at the time of his accession, Solomon experienced help from the Lord (cf. , ; ).
Verse one tells us that “the LORD his God was with him and highly exalted him.” (v1)
At the close of 1 Chronicles (9:23–30) Solomon is presented as sitting on the Lord’s throne as king in place of David, his father, while the officials, the warriors, and King David’s sons pledged submission to him. The expression translated “established himself firmly” (hitpael of ḥāzaq) frequently is found where the new king assumed power after a time of difficulty (12:13; 13:21; 17:1; 21:4). Despite problems at the time of his accession, Solomon experienced help from the Lord (cf. , ; ), who made him great (cf. ; ; ).
This chapter summarizes for us how great Solomon was - or putting it better - how great the LORD made Solomon.
This chapter can be divided into a few sections:
his worship (vv. 2–6);
his worship (vv. 2–6), his wisdom (vv. 7–13), and his wealth (vv. 14–17).
his wisdom (vv. 7–13);
his wealth (vv. 14–17)

Solomon’s worship (2-6)

Solomon spoke to “all Israel” and collected the “whole assembly” of Israel to where the tabernacle was located in Gibeon to worship the LORD and to inquire of him (v5). Remember, once again, that the tabernacle and the altar of the LORD that Moses had built was not with the ark. The ark and it’s contents was in Gibeon.
Remember, once again, that the tabernacle of the LORD is not with the ark. It is in Gibeon.
Also, we are told that the altar that David had built
It was on the altar at the tabernacle where the LORD wanted the sacrifices of his people to be offered. One thousand burnt offerings are made at this point and Solomon inquires of the LORD.

Solomon’s Wisdom (7-13)

That very night that Solomon had led the people in worship and praying to God, God appears to Solomon in a dream (). Solomon does the “wise” thing as a younger man with such a sobering task of leading God’s people: he asks for wisdom for this work. Such a great request is given a “yes” answer, but God goes beyond this and decides to make Solomon, not just the wisest king of his time, but He promised to give him great physical wealth and glory unlike any other king before or after him.

Solomon’s Wealth (14-17)

Then the chapter closes out by giving us some details about the wealth of Solomon. The king made silver and gold as common in Jerusalem as stones, and he made cedar as abundant as sycamore in the Judean foothills. (, CSB)
It is hard to imagine the amount of wealth that Solomon had. Chapter 9 tells us that gold was in such abundance that Solomon made all of his drinking vessels out of it and did not use silver because it was considered “nothing” at the time… Solomon surpassed all the kings of the world in riches and wisdom
King Solomon surpassed all the kings of the world in riches and wisdom
With his wealth also came military strength. He acquired chariots from Egypt and had 12,000 horsemen.
The law of Moses, significantly, had forbidden excess in these very matters (); they were, in fact, the sorts of sins that Solomon’s prosperity eventually precipitated.

In accordance with all his father commanded him, Solomon decides to build the temple for the name of the LORD in Jerusalem. Solomon began the preparations to build the temple by sending a letter to Hiram, the king of Tyre. He asked him to help in the building of the temple as Hiram had helped David in his building projects. Solomon asked for timber and for workers, and he would give Hiram’s workers gifts to send to Hiram.
He also decided to build a palace for himself. Solomon began the preparations to build the temple by sending a letter to Hiram, the king of Tyre. He asked him to help in the building of the temple as Hiram had helped David in his building projects. Solomon asked for timber and for workers, and he would give Hiram’s workers gifts to send to Hiram.
Solomon simply asks Hiram to continue the kindness he had previously shown to David (v. 3), and reminds him that the project is for God’s glory rather than Solomon’s (vv. 4–6).
He also decided to build a palace for himself. Solomon began the preparations to build the temple by sending a letter to Hiram, the king of Tyre. He asked him to help in the building of the temple as Hiram had helped David in his building projects. Solomon asked for timber and for workers, and he would give Hiram’s workers gifts to send to Hiram.
Solomon’s words about God within his letter are amazing.
The temple that I am building will be great, for our God is greater than any of the gods. But who is able to build a temple for him, since even heaven and the highest heaven cannot contain him? Who am I then that I should build a temple for him...? (, CSB)
This is a great reminder of God’s greatness. Wherever it may be that God puts His name or dwells, the fulness of God’s glory is not there. As David said earlier, the temple will be God’s footstool. Such a building cannot contain Him. Stephen in the book of Acts refers to this passage in his sermon.
Hiram responded favorably to Solomon’s request.
It is perhaps surprising that Hiram acknowledges so clearly and enthusiastically the temple project as the will of Israel’s God and to praise Him as the creator of the Heavens and the earth.
Chapter 2He asked him to help in the building of the temple as Hiram had helped David in his building projects. Solomon asked for timber and for workers, and he would give Hiram’s workers gifts (presumably to bring to Hiram). Hiram responded favorably to Solomon’s request. He said to Solomon, “Because the Lord loves his people, he set you over them as king” (2:11). He blessed the LORD and spoke with respect towards Solomon, agreeing to send an artisan who was skilled in working with metals and fabrics. He also agreed to send all of the timber that would be necessary to build the temple.
And regarding Solomon, Hiram wrote, “Because the Lord loves his people, he set you over them as king” (2:11), and then he talks about Solomon’s wisdom in v12. He blessed the LORD and spoke with respect towards Solomon and agreed to send an artisan who was skilled in working with metals and fabrics. He also agreed to send all of the timber that would be necessary to build the temple.
In verses 17-18, Solomon also took a census of the non-Israelites in the land so that he could appoint them as workers and supervisors for the work of the temple.

I don’t have a lot to say about chapters 3 and 4.
Chapters 3-4: These two chapters gives us the details of the work in building the temple. The work begins in 3:1 and finishes in 5:1. The temple was constructed on Mount Moriah, at the place where the Lord appeared to David during the punishment of David’s sinful census. David purchased this plot of land from Ornan the Jebusite. This land may also be the place where Abraham attempted to sacrifice his son, Isaac (see ).
These two chapters gives us the details of the work in building the temple. The work begins in 3:1 and finishes in 5:1. The temple was constructed on Mount Moriah, at the place where the Lord appeared to David during the punishment of David’s sinful census. David purchased this plot of land from Ornan the Jebusite. This land may also be the place where Abraham attempted to sacrifice his son, Isaac (see ).
The account of the building is smaller than the account in 1 Kings. There is more emphasis given to the dedication of the temple than the building of the temple. It is clear that the Chronicler’s real concern is with the temple’s meaning rather than its architectural details.
The chapter provides a simple tour thorough the building, beginning with he porch (4), then the main sanctuary (5-7) and the Holy of Holies (8-13), with separate notes on the veil (14) and the entrance pillars (15-17).
Solomon also built two courtyards around the temple in ch4: the courtyard for the priests and the larger outer courtyard, as well as all of the furniture and utensils for the temple: the tables, lamp-stands, altars, etc.
They were made by Huram-abi, the artisan sent by Hiram, king of Tyre (see 2:13)
They were made by Huram-abi, the artisan sent by Hiram, king of Tyre (see 2:13)

So all the work Solomon did for the Lord’s temple was completed. Then Solomon brought the consecrated things of his father David—the silver, the gold, and all the utensils—and put them in the treasuries of God’s temple. (, CSB)
Chapter 5: The temple is now finished and the treasuries of the temple have been filled. Solomon summons the Israelites for a festival in Jerusalem so the temple could be dedicated. It is the month of the Day of Atonement and the Feast of Tabernacles. The ark of the covenant is brought by the Levites into the Most Holy Place in the temple, and the tabernacle and its furnishings were brought from Gibeon to be stored in the temple also.
We are reminded once again of the things David did to provide for the temple, tying together David & Solomon’s reigns around the LORD’s presence among His people. David had several times dedicated material for the temple, and he had also prepared for the treasuries to be filled.
With the temple preparations which David began as far back as now completed, the story of the building of the temple reaches its climax. All of Israel is involved now in this great event: all the tribal heads (5:2), all the men of Israel (5:3), all the elders of Israel (5:4), and all of the priests who had consecrated themselves (5:11). IT IS TIME TO BRING THE ARK, WHICH SYMBOLIZED GOD’S PRESENCE AMONG HIS PEOPLE, INTO THE TEMPLE.
But the priests and levites do not just retrieve the ark to put into the temple, but also the tabernacle and its contents which were in Gibeon were brought to the temple also.
David had several times dedicated material for the temple, and he had also prepared for the treasuries to be filled.
In verse 7, the Chronicler writes, "The priests then brought the ark of the Lord’s covenant to its place in the inner sanctuary of the temple, the Most Holy Place.”
also prepared for the treasuries, both in terms of
The temple is now finished and the treasuries of the temple have been filled. Solomon summons the Israelites for a festival in Jerusalem so the temple could be dedicated. It is the month of the Day of Atonement and the Feast of Tabernacles. The ark of the covenant is brought by the Levites into the Most Holy Place in the temple, and the tabernacle and its furnishings were brought from Gibeon to be stored in the temple also.
Solomon summons the Israelites for a festival in Jerusalem so the temple could be dedicated. It is the month of the Day of Atonement and the Feast of Tabernacles. The ark of the covenant is brought by the Levites into the Most Holy Place in the temple, and the tabernacle and its furnishings were brought from Gibeon to be stored in the temple also.
As the priests withdraw from the Holy Place, the musicians burst into a mighty psalm of praise. One hundred and twenty priests sound their trumpets, and the temple is filled with the cloud of God’s glory just as the tabernacle had been.
The trumpeters and singers joined together to praise and thank the Lord with one voice. They raised their voices, accompanied by trumpets, cymbals, and musical instruments, in praise to the Lord: For he is good; his faithful love endures forever. The temple, the Lord’s temple, was filled with a cloud. And because of the cloud, the priests were not able to continue ministering, for the glory of the Lord filled God’s temple.(, CSB)
The ark of the covenant, the royal line of David, and the house of God, and God’s own presence among the people are all brought together for the first time in Jerusalem. The worship of God is now centered in one place! God’s faithfulness to His promises to David and to Israel is on full display for His people to see, including the remnant who returned from captivity to build the second temple.
The ark of the covenant, the royal line of David, and the house of God are all brought together for the first time. The worship of God is now centered in one place.
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