Faithlife Sermons

Sermon Tone Analysis

Overall tone of the sermon

This automated analysis scores the text on the likely presence of emotional, language, and social tones. There are no right or wrong scores; this is just an indication of tones readers or listeners may pick up from the text.
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Tone of specific sentences

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Anger
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*GREYFRIARS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH*
* *
*THEMES FROM ROMANS*
 
1.
THE JUDGEMENT OF  GOD
 
Passage: Romans 1:17 - 32
 
*Introduction:* In this letter to the Romans, Paul sets out for Christian people he has never met his understanding of "the Gospel".
It is also to prepare the way for a personal visit (see 15:28‑32) when possibly his plan would be to use Rome as his base for a mission to Spain.
Romans 1: 16 and 17 may be seen as encapsulating the theme of the letter and of the Good News, which is the revelation of the righteousness of God.
 
Paul commences his exposition of the Gospel with the theme of judgment "the wrath of God" summarised in verse 18 and elaborated upon in the remainder of the section.
In a word God's righteousness is demonstrated in judgment on sin.
He begins with wrath rather than grace to show the depth of the human predicament and the extent of our need.
Notice the reasons for such righteous judgment:
 
*1.
Suppressing the Truth (18‑20)*
As will as God's righteousness being revealed, God's wrath is being revealed.
We don't like to think of that too much.
C.K. Barrett defines wrath as "God's personal (though never malicious or in a bad sense, emotional) reaction against sin".
Some regard "ungodliness" as sins against God and "wickedness" as sins against human beings.
What they are suppresses, hinders, obscures, the truth about God as who He is!
Consider the appeal to general revelation, (19‑20) i.e.
God manifest in creation.
Notice the outcome.
Although such revelation is only partial, "they are without excuse".
This conclusion will be worked over in the next couple of chapters and the bottom line will be "all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God (3:23).
DISCUSSION: We think of "judgment" as future.
From the context (1:18) Paul sees it as at least partly present.
How can you see "the wrath of God is being revealed...."
 
*2.
Supplanting the Lord (21‑25)*
See how Paul presents sin not in terms of human peccadilloes and spiritual trivia, but with tragic dimensions and cosmic proportions.
Knowing the truth about God ‑ cf.
v.20 - they rebelled against Him, withholding worship and praise.
·        Their thinking became futile and their understanding was darkened.
·        They claimed "wisdom" but acted as fools, exchanging the glory of God for man‑made idols.
·        "They exchanged the truth about God for the lie" (v.25).The tragic outcome is that "God gave them up or over . . . .
.”
DISCUSSION:  How can society today exchange the truth about God for the lie?
 
*3.
Subverting the People (26‑32)*
This section is a summary of horror.
Here is society “given up and handed over” to dishonourable passions, base minds and improper conduct.
Notice the progression is from the inside outwards, from Mat is within humanity, rather than environmental factors.
Not content with rebellion against God, they repudiate Him.
They cast Him off.
Their end is not a new humanity at all; rather they are dehumanized ‑ "senseless, faithless, heartless, ruthless" (31).
The outcome is topsy-turvy values, where evil becomes good and desirable.
Sin is condoned, legalised and applauded.
Those who live like that are the new heroes.
DISCUSSION: Compare the picture of judgment in Hebrews 10:31 with that of Romans 1:24, 26 and 28
 
\\ .*
GREYFRIARS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH*
* *
*THEMES FROM ROMANS*
* *
*2 The Righteousness of God*
Passage: Romans 3:21‑4:5
 
*Introduction:* You come to one of the most crucial passages in Romans.
All kinds of key words and ideas are contained in it as well as the pictures or associations they call up.
We fail to grasp the full implication of what is set forth in these verses unless and.
until we appreciate the black background of the previous two chapters.
Paul has been setting out the seriousness of the human situation due to sin and the solemnity of God's judgment.
Read through the last section  (3:9‑20) ‑ and the conclusion is "that all men, Jews and Greeks, are under the power of sin".
This has come about to leave us speechless before and accountable to the living God.
(19) Having brought us to this  point Paul proceeds to explain more fully “the righteousness from God” ‑  "But now".
*1.
The Dilemma of Righteousness: Justification*
The problem clearly is that having established God's holiness and glory as well as our sorry human sinfulness ‑ how can we possibly be "declared righteous" or set right with God?
This righteousness has been manifested (c.f.
1:17), quite separately from the Law ‑ although both the Law and the prophets look forward to it.
How can God who is righteous, set us right with himself and still maintain his integrity?
In 4:5 God is described as "him who justifies the ungodly".
Justify~/justification is essentially a figure from the law court.
The accused, tried, found guilty and condemned, is rather acquitted and released.
Thus just as "all have sinned" (23) so "all who believe" (22) receive the righteousness of God and are justified.
This is a gracious, saving, act of God ‑ undeserved and unmerited.
DISCUSSION: "Nothing in my hand I bring" ‑ how can we appreciate more the fact that it is God who sets us right with himself?
In what ways do we forget this truth?
*2.
The Demand of Righteousness: Propitiation~/Expiation *
See again verses 24 and 25a.
Depending on your version the work of Christ on the cross is described as "propitiation" or "expiation".
The Greek “hilasterion” should be translated literally as the former, although both ideas are related.
Donald Guthrie shows that the difference is important.
Expiation relates to sins.
Propitiation relates to God.
Expiation is an act which permits the removal of the consequence of sin.
Propitiation is an act which enables God to receive the sinner.
Clearly, in the death of Christ God himself is involved ‑ He is not just being appeased or bought off.
Notice verse 25 "God put (him) forward" (cf. 2 Cor  5:19).
In this event God is indeed taking seriously both his own holiness and righteousness and our sin and condemnation.
Redemption always implies more than mere  liberation (!) ‑ it includes Christ's offering up of himself~/his life as a ransom ‑ cf.
Mark 10:45.
DISCUSSION:  Read again verses 24‑25a, now share with one another something which has become precious or meaningful to you from them.
*3.
The Demonstration of Righteousness: Grace and Faith*
The principle by which this righteousness from God can be received is set out.
·        We are “justified by his grace as a gift” (24) or "freely by his grace" (NIV ).
The emphasis is on the initiative, goodness and generosity of God. 
·        “This righteousness from God comes through faith in Jesus Christ” (22) The element of faith is emphasised "to all who believe".
Faith, not works, merit or boasting is what is important!
Even faith itself is a gift of God (cf.
Eph.2:8).
·        A pattern of this principle at  work is given in Abraham (4:1‑5) who “believed God and it was reckoned to him as righteousness”.
Thus Paul goes back before Moses and the giving of the Law to the father of the people of God!
DISCUSSION:  How is the word.
"faith" sometimes misused?
What should it involve?
\\ .*
GREYFRIARS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH*
 
*THEMES FROM ROMANS*
 
*3.
JUSTIFICATION*
 
Passage: Romans 5:1‑11
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