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The Danger of Pride Mixed with Ignorance - part i

Let's be a Christ-centered Church  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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Introductory Remarks:
As a reminder:
Introductory Remarks:
Paul has foregone his rights as an apostle/preacher of the gospel for the sake of seeing the gain of others. He ha done so in a disciplined manner.
In this chapter, Paul sets forth a warning, and he uses the Old Testament Israel to warn the New Testament Corinthians.
Secondly, Paul has
Warnings are only meaningful to us if we agree on what the dangers are.
Success or gain is only meaningful to us based upon what we use to define success.
The reason the warnings of Paul will not mean much to us today is because we have not truly taken time to evaluate what he has said is truly gain from chapter 9. In recent days, we have had flies enter into our home. They tend to be a nuisance. When I grab the fly swatter and wait patiently, I am aware of the danger that the fly is in; but the fly is not aware of the danger. His older brother is not alive any longer tell him what happens when the human grabs the fly swatter.
It is imperative that we define success and danger the same way the apostle Paul is setting forth in these passages. We must define what it means to be qualified and disqualified in the same way that he does.
For example:
You are not a success or qualified in God’s economy because you:
Have successful children in the work-force.
Have have money in your bank account.
Have successfully finished a long career in one job.
Have your children signed up for every sport.
Have finished a graduate-level degree at a reputable institution
Rather, Paul would say that a qualified person is one who (HAVING BEEN CHANGED AND WHO IS BEING CHANGED BY THE CROSS OF CHRIST):
Is spiritually disciplined
Is truly sacrificial for the gospel’s sake
Is truly a servant to all
Is considerate of the spiritual maturity and needs of others
Is continually striving to give the gospel to win others or to edify others…etc
In practical terms this means:
An individual who
There are particular reasons why Paul can expect this kind of internal, spiritual reality to be present in the minds of the Corinthians.

(1) The fact of the Gentile Corinthians being “brethren” is a reminder of the brotherhood instituted in Christ (v. 1)

i. "Moreover" - because I don't want to be a disqualified individual I am warning you too, so that you might not be disqualified.
ii. Both "brethren" and "our fathers" remind them and us of God's wise plan to bring all into one body by Christ.
There are two significant point to consider here: (1) The Corinthians believers were likely mainly of non-Jewish descent, which shows to us that God’s plan was never just for Israel.
Secondly, the reason this important and consistent with the book is because the church is the place where all the universe sees the “many-sided” wisdom of God ().
To the intent that now unto the principalities and powers in heavenly places might be known by the church the manifold wisdom of God...
The Holy Bible: King James Version. (2009). (Electronic Edition of the 1900 Authorized Version., ). Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.
See also:
In calling them “brethren” he is reminding them of what God has done to bring them into the family, and this reality should bring about humility and unity; but rather, in the church we are seeing pride and division. Paul is setting forth a warning to them.
The warning amounts to this: Do not be smug in your firm stand for Christ. Keep alert lest you fall. - Mare, W. H. (1976). 1 Corinthians. In F. E. Gaebelein (Ed.), The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Romans through Galatians (Vol. 10, p. 250). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House.
The warning amounts to this: Do not be smug in your firm stand for Christ. Keep alert lest you fall. - Mare, W. H. (1976). 1 Corinthians. In F. E. Gaebelein (Ed.), The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Romans through Galatians (Vol. 10, p. 250). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House.
Mare, W. H. (1976). 1 Corinthians. In F. E. Gaebelein (Ed.), The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Romans through Galatians (Vol. 10, p. 250). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House.
Notice “I would not that ye should be ignorant” - it seems that Paul is concerned of their demise due to ignorance. Notice . Some think that they are standing. When you bring these two thoughts together, you realize that IGNORANCE mingled with PRIDE is a dangerous recipe for disaster.
Question:

Why is ignorance not always bliss?

At the Liberty Center in West Chester, around the back of the Mall there is a parking garage. It has multiple entrances at different levels. As you are coming from the back of the facility towards the front, and you are coming upon on these entrances, there are these large round mirrors posted in an elevated position. These are there to make people aware of what is around the corner that you may not see. This awareness can help avoid tragedy. This knowledge can help avoid disaster. This is to ward off complete ignorance.
Partial Ignorance:
There is another type of ignorance that exists. The first, I will call complete ignorance; but this one I will call partial ignorance. Partial ignorance can also be devastating. It is where you know just enough to know there is danger but not enough to avoid the danger. One year we took the teens to a paintball course. I got out early so I got to watch the war between two teams from the sidelines. I observed two of our teens at a standoff. Both were sheltered behind objects in the field. I observed as teenager A waited patiently for teenager B to stick his head out from behind protection. Sure enough, teenager B did so. Teenager B knew that there was danger, but he was unaware as to how imminent the danger was or where exactly the danger resided. When Teen B stuck his head out, Teen A landed a paintball right on Teen B’s mask.
It is this second kind of partial ignorance that I believe the members of the Corinthian Church are struggling with, and this is the same with GBC.

(2) The facts of which the Corinthians are ignorant, are facts that should change the Corinthian’s desires (v. 1 - 6)

i. all our fathers received the same supernatural guidance
“Under the cloud” indicates that they were under God’s guidance (, ; ; ; ; )—a guidance that was sure, since they all passed through the Red Sea. - EBC
ii. all our fathers were baptized to Moses (v. 2)
That “they were all baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea” simply means they were initiated and inaugurated under God into union with him and also with Moses and his leadership. - EBC
iii. all our fathers received the same spiritual provision (v. 3 - 4)
a. spiritual meat
That the terms are to be taken as typical is seen in the statement “that rock was Christ” (cf. ), who was with them to save them. - EBC
b. spiritual drink (Rock = Christ)
They were typical of Christ the true bread and drink to come (cf. ). That the terms are to be taken as typical is seen in the statement “that rock was Christ”... - Mare, W. H.
Mare, W. H.
iv. many of our fathers did not please God (v. 5)
Paul declares, by his elaborate Old Testament analogies: “Participation in spectacular spiritual experiences does not relieve the people of God from ethical responsibility.” - Blomberg, C. (1994). 1 Corinthians (p. 195). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House.
Blomberg, C. (1994). 1 Corinthians (p. 195). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House.
explanation: the account with our fathers were divinely ordained types to change the Corinthian's desires (v. 6)
Conclusion (Application):

(1) the examples of the Old Testament should cause us to examine our desires

the reason this is possible is because of the divine work that God has done in redeeming us. We see Jesus who willfully submitted to be smitten (the Rock) so that those who were not able to fight the enslavement to sin....
Polls of Americans, including American Christians, have shown that the two things we long for the most are more money and better bodies, precisely what the counterfeit “health-wealth” gospel claims to be able to deliver. Blomberg, C. (1994). 1 Corinthians (p. 198). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House.
Blomberg, C. (1994). 1 Corinthians (p. 198). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House.

(2) all believers & unbelievers should take heed:

for unbelievers, being a recipient of common grace or of common spiritual experiences does not bring you into favor with the Lord
Millions of Americans weekly attend worship services in buildings with the label Christian attached to them, thinking that in so doing they are or are becoming right with God, without ever having been truly born again.
Blomberg, C. (1994). 1 Corinthians (p. 198). Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House.
for believers, be warned against turning back to the weak and beggarly elements that the Lord saved you from hoping in
One application here is for those who sense the liberty to engage in cultural hedonism.
this is the idea that “if it feels good do it.”
this is the idea that “suffering is my biggest enemy and pleasure is by greatest pursuit.”
this is the idea that “i don’t want to go to that event or gathering because it’s not going to be fun
this is the idea that “if it’s not entertaining, it’s not worth it
ILL: kids using devices while watching a show...
Second application:
Returning to works righteousness. We would not readily admit this; but our feelings and anxieties do show this. Some examples:
this is the idea that we are somehow culturally superior than others who don’t live the way we live. Evidence:
“I don’t want my kids hanging out with that kid.”
“they ought to just send them back to their country.”
Give advice to our children that is moralistic:
“you should be like....”
“God blesses those who DO good and punishes those who DO bad....”

(3) God is faithful - there is never a temptation where God is not more trustworthy than the temptation itself

The immediately following reference to God’s faithfulness should probably be understood in contrast to Paul’s reference to our human tendency to be unfaithful to him (i.e., idolatrous). - Ciampa, R. E., & Rosner, B. S. (2010). The First Letter to the Corinthians (p. 467).
Ciampa, R. E., & Rosner, B. S. (2010). The First Letter to the Corinthians (p. 467). Grand Rapids, MI; Cambridge, U.K.: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.
The Pillar New Testament Commentary: The First Letter to the Corinthians b. The History of Israel Shows that Those Who Lack Self-Restraint Are Condemned, 10:1–13

The immediately following reference to God’s faithfulness should probably be understood in contrast to Paul’s reference to our human tendency to be unfaithful to him (i.e., idolatrous).

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