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King of Glory

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The King of Glory

Psalm 24:7–10 KJV 1900
Lift up your heads, O ye gates; And be ye lift up, ye everlasting doors; And the King of glory shall come in. Who is this King of glory? The Lord strong and mighty, The Lord mighty in battle. Lift up your heads, O ye gates; Even lift them up, ye everlasting doors; And the King of glory shall come in. Who is this King of glory? The Lord of hosts, he is the King of glory. Selah.
Ps 24:7+10
Wake up, you sleepyhead city! Wake up, you sleepyhead people! King-Glory is ready to enter. 8  Who is this King-Glory? GOD, armed and battle-ready. 9  Wake up, you sleepyhead city! Wake up, you sleepyhead people! King-Glory is ready to enter. 10  Who is this King-Glory? GOD-of-the-Angel-Armies: he is King-Glory. In this prophetic passage, reference is made to gates and doors that open vertically rather than horizontally as is commonly done. This would then be a fortification type of gate, one that could be lowered quickly, literally dropped, when necessary. This type of gate was called cataracta, because of the force and noise with which it fell. It was, as said, used in the fortification of cities, and corresponds to the more recent porticullis, which was a grating of iron or wooden bars or slats, suspended in the gateway of a fortified place and lowered to block passage. The cataracta was believed to have been known in David’s time. During his time the “King of glory” was represented by the ark being brought in a triumphal procession to the sanctuary. The fivefold use of “King of glory” in our text-verse passage, and this King’s identification as the “Lord of hosts,” leads many commentators to believe that this passage is messianic (compare ). As such, these verses speak prophetically of the ascension of Christ after His victory over sin and death and of His coming reign as King over all the earth.
Psalm 25:1–7 KJV 1900
Unto thee, O Lord, do I lift up my soul. O my God, I trust in thee: let me not be ashamed, Let not mine enemies triumph over me. Yea, let none that wait on thee be ashamed: Let them be ashamed which transgress without cause. Shew me thy ways, O Lord; teach me thy paths. Lead me in thy truth, and teach me: For thou art the God of my salvation; On thee do I wait all the day. Remember, O Lord, thy tender mercies and thy lovingkindnesses; For they have been ever of old. Remember not the sins of my youth, nor my transgressions: According to thy mercy remember thou me For thy goodness’ sake, O Lord.
Psalm 15:1 KJV 1900
Lord, Who shall abide in thy tabernacle? Who shall dwell in thy holy hill?
Psalm 15:1–2 KJV 1900
Lord, Who shall abide in thy tabernacle? Who shall dwell in thy holy hill? He that walketh uprightly, and worketh righteousness, And speaketh the truth in his heart.
Ps Freeman, J. M., & Chadwick, H. J. (1998). Manners & customs of the Bible (p. 315). North Brunswick, NJ: Bridge-Logos Publishers.
Freeman, J. M., & Chadwick, H. J. (1998). Manners & customs of the Bible (p. 315). North Brunswick, NJ: Bridge-Logos Publishers.
Ps Freeman, J. M., & Chadwick, H. J. (1998). Manners & customs of the Bible (p. 315). North Brunswick, NJ: Bridge-Logos Publishers.
Peterson, E. H. (2005). The Message: the Bible in contemporary language (Ps 24:7–10). Colorado Springs, CO: NavPress.
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