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When a Woman fed up, there is nothing you can do about it

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Introduction

The actors Whoopi Goldberg and Oprah Winfrey played the characters of two helpless and hopeless women in the movie “The Color Purple,” Steven Spielberg’s 1985 film adaptation of Alice Walker’s novel, is a bonafide classic movie filled with many memorable scenes and quotes. You may can recall several scenes of the movie that brought about there frustration with Harpo and Mister.
2. “You told Harpo to beat me!” - Celie (Whoopi Goldberg) gives Harpo (Willard Pugh) a bad piece of advice…
Celie (Whoopi Goldberg) gives Harpo (Willard Pugh) a bad piece of advice…
3. “Celie’s Fixin To Shave Mister!” - After putting up with Mister’s (Danny Glover) abusive ways for decades, Celie (Whoopi Goldberg) is nearing her breaking point.
3. “Celie’s Fixin To Shave Mister!” - After putting up with Mister’s (Danny Glover) abusive ways for decades, Celie (Whoopi Goldberg) is nearing her breaking point.
After putting up with Mister’s (Danny Glover) abusive ways for decades, Celie (Whoopi Goldberg) is nearing her breaking point.
4. “I’m poor, black… I may even be ugly, but dear God, I’m here!” - As the movie draws to a conclusion, Celie finally stands up to Mister.
4. “I’m poor, black… I may even be ugly, but dear God, I’m here!” - As the movie draws to a conclusion, Celie finally stands up to Mister.
Tyler Perry wrote a play turned movie called “The Diary of a Mad Black Woman” - Helen McCarter has everything a woman wants: a nice house and rich husband. However after her husband Charles throws her out of the house after admitting to an affair a distraught Helen turns to her mother, grandmother Madea and cousin Brian who take her in and turn back to God. Helen learns for the first time in her life to stand up on her two feet and is ready to remove herself from her relationship with Charles and move on with Orlando. But when her husband is almost killed by a vengeful client, Helen wonders if she has the heart to forgive him despite everything.
In these two movie examples these women where fed up, and there was nothing you could do about it.
As preacher of the Gospel of Jesus the Christ, we have focused on her condition and her suffering. Today I want to look at this woman “Will(personal strength) for God.”
I appeal to you therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship. Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.
For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe.
I'm standing here looking in the mirror
Saying "damn" to myself
Saying "xxxx" to myself
I should have known the day would come
That she would find somebody else
And all the things I took her through
Shit, I shouldn't have lasted this long
Now I'm at this telephone booth calling Tyrone
'Cause when a woman's fed up
No matter how you beg, no
It ain't nothing you can do about it (nothing you can do about it)
It's like running out of love
No matter what you say, no
And then it's too late to talk about it (too late to talk about it)
This is an outward look on inward problem. We have to take this same outlook on this woman today in the scripture.
She was fed up, and it was nothing anyone could do about it because her desire to be heal was now her will to be heal. In other words, when we become fed up, ours desires should transform to a will to seek God.
We may desire God, but how many of us really follow him, when he shows up.
In other words, when we become fed up, ours desires should transform to a will to seek God.
How many of us really let him operate solely?
We may desire God, but how many of us want him.
How many of us can solely put it in his hand?
How many of us really want our situation to change?
What are we doing about it?
How are we preparing?
Think about this - this woman is bleeding for 12 long years. She been to several doctors, they gave and probably sold her some of the best medication money could buy at the time. none of it worked.
We go to the doctor for our conditions, pay some of the best health care money can buy. Get the greatest and latest medicines. How many of us work against the meds, work against our prevention plan.
See this woman realize that its not the physical limitation of the condition but its about the Spiritual Greatness of oneself that touches Christ. This woman being helpless and hopeless desires became helpful and hopeful.
I believe that this no named woman shows us:
1) Hopelessness Approach - Attitude
The Gospel according to Mark (King James Version) H. The Approaches that Lay Hold of Jesus’ Authority: How to Approach Jesus, 5:21–43

the second scene is that of a woman’s hopeless approach (see note—Mt. 9:20–22). This approach always lays hold of Jesus. Jesus senses the touch of the hopeless and always helps the hopeless who come to Him. A hopeless approach involves four attitudes.

The Gospel according to Mark (King James Version) H. The Approaches that Lay Hold of Jesus’ Authority: How to Approach Jesus, 5:21–43

(5:25–34) Hopelessness—Attitude: the second scene is that of a woman’s hopeless approach (see note—Mt. 9:20–22). This approach always lays hold of Jesus. Jesus senses the touch of the hopeless and always helps the hopeless who come to Him. A hopeless approach involves four attitudes.

3 (5:25–34) Hopelessness—Attitude: the second scene is that of a woman’s hopeless approach (see note—). This approach always lays hold of Jesus. Jesus senses the touch of the hopeless and always helps the hopeless who come to Him. A hopeless approach involves four attitudes.
1. There is the last resort attitude. The woman had been hemorrhaging for twelve years; it was uncontrollable. No one could touch her nor anything she had touched. By law she was considered unclean, so unclean that she was to be divorced by her husband (). She was to be totally cut off from society and religious worship. This particular woman had tried all she knew. She had seen “many physicians” and “spent all that she had,” and yet she “grew worse.” There was nowhere else to turn except to Jesus. (See note— for more detail of her condition.)
“Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest” ().
We as children of God have to seek the Christ for rest, we around here allowing folks to get under our skin, run our blood pressure up, worsen our health, worrying about that weary spouse, disobedient children, worrying about job, worrying about the church.
Tell somebody - Give it to Jesus!
Thought 1. When all else fails, there is Jesus. However, most people try all else before Jesus. Nevertheless, He loves us and He cares for us—enormously so. We should turn to Jesus, for He is always waiting for us—waiting even if we turn to Him as a last resort.
Thought 2. A person who has been brought to the point of helplessness and hopelessness can be helped. When there is no hope anywhere else, there is hope in Christ.
Thought 3. There is no need to reach the point of hopelessness; no need to reach the end of our ropes; no need to become utterly depressed. Circumstances should never be allowed to destroy us, not to the point of utter hopelessness. Nevertheless, many reach that point. The one thing to remember is that Jesus does care and will never turn away from the hopeless. He opens His arms to all who come—even to the hopeless.
2. There is the shy, embarrassed, unworthy attitude. Note the woman elbowed her way through the crowd and came up behind Jesus. She wanted to touch Jesus without being seen or noticed. Why? She was embarrassed and felt unworthy. Her hemorrhaging was a personal, intimate matter for her, something she did not want to be known and discussed. She was considered unclean; therefore, she felt unworthy to approach Jesus.
Thought 1. It is the sense of unworthiness and hopelessness that touches the heart of Jesus; it is not being shy and fearing embarrassment. Being shy and fearing embarrassment are only the attitudes that create a sense of unworthiness and hopelessness. Jesus accepts any of the hopeless who truly come to Him, no matter what causes their sense of unworthiness.
Thought 2. Embarrassing matters, personal matters, secret matters—all are understood by Christ. He wishes no one to suffer ridicule or shame. He will accept the shy, quiet approach that comes to Him.
Thought 3. There are personal, embarrassing matters that we all wish to keep secret. These sometimes cause problems for us, serious problems that drive us to the point of hopelessness. Even a shy, embarrassed attitude that approaches Jesus will be acceptable. A sense of unworthiness and hopelessness touches His heart.
“The LORD is nigh unto them that are of a broken heart; and saveth such as be of a contrite spirit” ().
“The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise” ().
3. There is the expectant, believing attitude. Note that the hopeless woman believed what “she had heard of Jesus.” She believed the gospel, that Jesus loved and cared and would make her whole. Note the thoughts of her mind, “If I may touch but His clothes, I shall be whole” (v. 28). She believed in her thoughts, in her heart. She believed two things: the gospel (what she had heard about Jesus) and the power of Jesus to make her whole.
Thought 1. The same expectant, believing attitude is essential for any person to come to Christ, whether hopeless or not. One must believe in the gospel and in the power of Jesus to make one whole.
“Repent ye and believe the gospel” ().
“For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth” ().
“If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth” ().
4. There is the confessing attitude. Jesus had made the way easy for her. He had allowed her to be healed without embarrassment, but it was not enough to believe in secret. The secret disciple had to be brought to the point of confessing her faith.
a. The healing had cost Jesus. Spiritual virtue had flowed out from Him into the woman. The expenditure of virtue took its toll, sapping His physical strength. Jesus felt virtue drain from His body. He turned and asked the pressing throng surrounding Him, “Who touched my clothes?”
Would you answer? - It’s me, it’s me old Lord standing in the need of healing
a. Jesus turned to the woman. There was no way Jesus could have felt the touch to His robe. He was being pressed and thronged by the crowd, yet when she stepped up behind Him and touched His robe, He knew. How?
a. Jesus turned to the woman. There was no way Jesus could have felt the touch to His robe. He was being pressed and thronged by the crowd, yet when she stepped up behind Him and touched His robe, He knew. How?
1) Her faith touched Him. It is faith that touches Jesus. Faith will never go unnoticed nor be ignored by Jesus.
“And saying, The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand: repent ye, and believe the gospel” ().
“Jesus said unto him, If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth” ().
“Oh how great is thy goodness, which thou hast laid up for them that fear thee; which thou hast wrought for them that trust in thee before the sons of men!” ().
“Commit thy way unto the lord; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass” ().
2) Virtue (power and life) went out from Jesus into her. When a person places his faith in Jesus and His power, it touches Jesus, and Jesus infuses His virtue (His power and life) into that person. That is what life and salvation are all about: the infusion of God’s virtue, power, and life into the spirit of man.
“And Jesus, immediately knowing in himself that virtue had gone out of him, turned him about in the press, and said, Who touched my clothes?” ().
“Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever” ().
“Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust” (; see ).
Thought 1. Jesus stopped and turned to the woman. To Jesus the most important work in all the world is meeting a person’s need. The more desperate the need, the more Jesus wants to stop and face the need. Nothing will keep Jesus from stopping and turning to a person who comes to Him in desperation.
“That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses” (; see ).
Thought 1. Imagine the enormous amounts of virtue that flowed out from Jesus from the day of His baptism to the cross! Imagine the fathomless flow of virtue that flowed from the cross, covering believers of all generations. It is incomprehensible! Yet it is a fact—a fact that proclaims the love of the Son of God. He poured out all the virtue within His eternal being for mankind.
Thought 1. Imagine the enormous amounts of virtue that flowed out from Jesus from the day of His baptism to the cross! Imagine the fathomless flow of virtue that flowed from the cross, covering believers of all generations. It is incomprehensible! Yet it is a fact—a fact that proclaims the love of the Son of God. He poured out all the virtue within His eternal being for mankind.
b. The disciples were unaware of what it cost Jesus to minister. They were insensitive to the spiritual energy He was exerting. They were ignorant of what Jesus was doing:
⇒ “Himself took our infirmities, and bore our sicknesses” (; see ).
⇒ He was teaching that public confession of Him was essential.
The disciples were somewhat surprised at Jesus’ question: “Who touched me?” He was completely surrounded by a mass of people. In their surprise, they asked Him why He was asking such a question in the midst of so many people. How could He possibly expect not to be touched?
c. The woman confessed. When Jesus asked the question, the woman came up to Jesus “fearing and trembling.” She had approached Him being unclean and had not requested permission to touch Him. But she had still been healed. Now she felt that she must respond to His question and identify herself lest He rebuke her and reject her faith. She feared that somehow her healing might be reversed if she did not confess that she had touched Him. So “knowing what was done in her, [she] came and fell down before Him, and told Him all the truth.” It was difficult and embarrassing, but she did it.
“Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven” ().
“Also I say unto you, Whosoever shall confess me before men, him shall the Son of man also confess before the angels of God” ().
b. Jesus saw the woman. He saw her desperation, her confession of hopelessness, her need, her faith; and His heart went out to her from the depths of compassion.
Thought 1. The Lord cares for all, no matter how rejected, cut off, or ostracized. A person may be considered unclean, dirty, polluted, contaminated, lost forever; but that person is precious to our Lord. His heart goes out in tenderness and care to the greatest of sinners.
“For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities: but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need” ().
Note: When a person really comes to God in desperation, God immediately gives a knowledge of adoption and comfort. He gives such a release from pressure and desperation that the person’s spirit sighs and revels in the new found peace.
“But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name” ().
“For ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father” ().
“And will be a Father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty” ().
“But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons. And because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, Abba, Father” ().
5. The result is glorious. Jesus granted the request of the hopeless. “Daughter, thy faith hath made thee whole, go in peace, and be whole” (v. 34). The result was twofold. She received peace. The fear and trembling were taken away and she was flooded with peace. Second, she was made whole both physically and spiritually.
“Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid” ().
2) so we can see her wiliness.
“These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world” ().
c. Jesus adopted the woman. He called her “daughter” and adopted her into the family of God. He spoke to her in behalf of the Father and gave her the assurance that she was accepted by God. The fact that God would help her was conveyed to her immediately. Note also that Jesus said, “be of good cheer.” She experienced the consolation and assurance of God immediately.
Note: When a person really comes to God in desperation, God immediately gives a knowledge of adoption and comfort. He gives such a release from pressure and desperation that the person’s spirit sighs and revels in the new found peace.
“Then touched he their eyes, saying, According to your faith be it unto you. And their eyes were opened; and Jesus straitly charged them, saying, See that no man know it” ().
“But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name” ().
“For ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father” ().
“Jesus said unto him, If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth” ().
“And will be a Father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty” ().
“Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life” ().
“But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons. And because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, Abba, Father” ().
“That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation” ().
2 (9:20–22) Hopelessness: there was the secret hope for health by a woman. She had been hemorrhaging for twelve years (see Deeper Study # 2—). She was desperately hopeless, feeling ashamed, embarrassed, and unworthy. According to the law, she was not to be in the crowd surrounding Jesus at all. She was supposed to be isolated, but her desperation drove her to Jesus. She felt that Jesus would never touch her because she was unclean, but she had heard so many wonderful things about Him: if she could only touch His garment, He would never know, and she would be healed. Imagine her great faith! Jesus’ response was fourfold.
1) Her faith touched Him. It is faith that touches Jesus. Faith will never go unnoticed nor be ignored by Jesus.
“And saying, The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand: repent ye, and believe the gospel” ().
“Jesus said unto him, If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth” ().
“Oh how great is thy goodness, which thou hast laid up for them that fear thee; which thou hast wrought for them that trust in thee before the sons of men!” ().
“Commit thy way unto the lord; trust also in him; and he shall bring it to pass” ().
“And Jesus, immediately knowing in himself that virtue had gone out of him, turned him about in the press, and said, Who touched my clothes?” ().
“Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever” ().
“Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust” (; see ).
Thought 1. Jesus stopped and turned to the woman. To Jesus the most important work in all the world is meeting a person’s need. The more desperate the need, the more Jesus wants to stop and face the need. Nothing will keep Jesus from stopping and turning to a person who comes to Him in desperation.
“That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses” (; see ).
d. Jesus made her whole. His virtue (power and life) was infused into her, and she was saved and made whole. She had feared facing Jesus because she feared being rebuked. She was wrong. Jesus longed to heal the desperate among the people. No person is too dirty for Him. In fact, the more unclean a person is, the more He wants to cleanse and make him whole. Imagine such a Savior!
Thought 1. The Lord cares for all, no matter how rejected, cut off, or ostracized. A person may be considered unclean, dirty, polluted, contaminated, lost forever; but that person is precious to our Lord. His heart goes out in tenderness and care to the greatest of sinners.
“For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities: but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need” ().
c. Jesus adopted the woman. He called her “daughter” and adopted her into the family of God. He spoke to her in behalf of the Father and gave her the assurance that she was accepted by God. The fact that God would help her was conveyed to her immediately. Note also that Jesus said, “be of good cheer.” She experienced the consolation and assurance of God immediately.
Note: When a person really comes to God in desperation, God immediately gives a knowledge of adoption and comfort. He gives such a release from pressure and desperation that the person’s spirit sighs and revels in the new found peace.
“But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name” ().
“For ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father” ().
“And will be a Father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty” ().
“But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons. And because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, Abba, Father” ().
d. Jesus made her whole. His virtue (power and life) was infused into her, and she was saved and made whole. She had feared facing Jesus because she feared being rebuked. She was wrong. Jesus longed to heal the desperate among the people. No person is too dirty for Him. In fact, the more unclean a person is, the more He wants to cleanse and make him whole. Imagine such a Savior!
“But when Jesus heard that, he said unto them, They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick. But go ye and learn what that meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacrifice: for I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance” ().
“Even as the Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many” ().
“For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost” ().
Leadership Ministries Worldwide. (2004). The Gospel according to Matthew: Chapters 1:1–16:12 (Vol. 1, pp. 218–219). Chattanooga, TN: Leadership Ministries Worldwide.
4 (5:35–43) Faith: the third scene is that of a ruler’s believing approach. This approach always lays hold of Jesus. Jesus knows when a person truly believes. A believing approach involves one simple attitude, but there are also several attitudes that it does not involve.
3 (5:25–34) Hopelessness—Attitude: the second scene is that of a woman’s hopeless approach (see note—Mt. 9:20–22). This approach always lays hold of Jesus. Jesus senses the touch of the hopeless and always helps the hopeless who come to Him. A hopeless approach involves four attitudes.
1. There is the last resort attitude. The woman had been hemorrhaging for twelve years; it was uncontrollable. No one could touch her nor anything she had touched. By law she was considered unclean, so unclean that she was to be divorced by her husband (Le. 15:25–27). She was to be totally cut off from society and religious worship. This particular woman had tried all she knew. She had seen “many physicians” and “spent all that she had,” and yet she “grew worse.” There was nowhere else to turn except to Jesus. (See note—Mt. 9:20–22 for more detail of her condition.)
“Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest” (Mt. 11:28).
1. There is not a fearful, despairing attitude in faith. Believing has nothing to do with fear or despair.
Thought 1. When all else fails, there is Jesus. However, most people try all else before Jesus. Nevertheless, He loves us and He cares for us—enormously so. We should turn to Jesus, for He is always waiting for us—waiting even if we turn to Him as a last resort.
Thought 2. A person who has been brought to the point of helplessness and hopelessness can be helped. When there is no hope anywhere else, there is hope in Christ.
Thought 3. There is no need to reach the point of hopelessness; no need to reach the end of our ropes; no need to become utterly depressed. Circumstances should never be allowed to destroy us, not to the point of utter hopelessness. Nevertheless, many reach that point. The one thing to remember is that Jesus does care and will never turn away from the hopeless. He opens His arms to all who come—even to the hopeless.
a. Note the devastating circumstance that occurred. While Jesus was still talking with the woman, someone came from Jairus’ home with terrible news: his daughter was dead. Imagine the trauma—how Jairus felt. How anxious he must have felt with the pushing and shoving and slow movement of the crowd. How nervous he must have become as Jesus stopped to handle the matter with the hemorrhaging woman. If Jesus had just hurried, He could have reached his daughter in time. Jairus was devastated, crushed, fearful, and despairing. Now it was too late. He was helpless; all hope was gone.
2. There is the shy, embarrassed, unworthy attitude. Note the woman elbowed her way through the crowd and came up behind Jesus. She wanted to touch Jesus without being seen or noticed. Why? She was embarrassed and felt unworthy. Her hemorrhaging was a personal, intimate matter for her, something she did not want to be known and discussed. She was considered unclean; therefore, she felt unworthy to approach Jesus.
Thought 1. It is the sense of unworthiness and hopelessness that touches the heart of Jesus; it is not being shy and fearing embarrassment. Being shy and fearing embarrassment are only the attitudes that create a sense of unworthiness and hopelessness. Jesus accepts any of the hopeless who truly come to Him, no matter what causes their sense of unworthiness.
Thought 2. Embarrassing matters, personal matters, secret matters—all are understood by Christ. He wishes no one to suffer ridicule or shame. He will accept the shy, quiet approach that comes to Him.
b. Note: the challenge of Jesus is the answer to all fear and despair: “Be not afraid, only believe.” (See Deeper Study # 2—.)
Thought 3. There are personal, embarrassing matters that we all wish to keep secret. These sometimes cause problems for us, serious problems that drive us to the point of hopelessness. Even a shy, embarrassed attitude that approaches Jesus will be acceptable. A sense of unworthiness and hopelessness touches His heart.
“The LORD is nigh unto them that are of a broken heart; and saveth such as be of a contrite spirit” (Ps. 34:18).
“The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise” (Ps. 51:17).
2. There is not a wailing, whining attitude in faith. Believing has nothing to do with such an attitude. Society and others may engage in and encourage wailing and whining; they may feel and say that nothing can be done now, that all one can do is to bear up under the weight and tragedy of the loss.
3. There is the expectant, believing attitude. Note that the hopeless woman believed what “she had heard of Jesus.” She believed the gospel, that Jesus loved and cared and would make her whole. Note the thoughts of her mind, “If I may touch but His clothes, I shall be whole” (v. 28). She believed in her thoughts, in her heart. She believed two things: the gospel (what she had heard about Jesus) and the power of Jesus to make her whole.
Thought 1. The same expectant, believing attitude is essential for any person to come to Christ, whether hopeless or not. One must believe in the gospel and in the power of Jesus to make one whole.
“Repent ye and believe the gospel” (Mk. 1:15).
However, the answer to any circumstance, mild or tragic, is not wailing and whining. The answer is Jesus’ comfort and assurance. Even if the circumstance is death, Jesus comforts and assures: “Why make ye this ado, and weep? The damsel is not dead, but sleepeth” (v. 39). There is hope of the resurrection, which is a living fact, a living event that is to take place soon. In addition, there is hope of eternal life, of never dying, of being transported into the very presence of God upon passing from this life (; . See Deeper Study # 1—.)
“For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth” (Ro. 1:16).
“If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth” (Mk. 9:23).
4. There is the confessing attitude. Jesus had made the way easy for her. He had allowed her to be healed without embarrassment, but it was not enough to believe in secret. The secret disciple had to be brought to the point of confessing her faith.
“Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. Verily, verily, I say unto you, The hour is coming, and now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God: and they that hear shall live” ().
a. The healing had cost Jesus. Spiritual virtue had flowed out from Him into the woman. The expenditure of virtue took its toll, sapping His physical strength. Jesus felt virtue drain from His body. He turned and asked the pressing throng surrounding Him, “Who touched my clothes?”

Closing

Thought 1. Imagine the enormous amounts of virtue that flowed out from Jesus from the day of His baptism to the cross! Imagine the fathomless flow of virtue that flowed from the cross, covering believers of all generations. It is incomprehensible! Yet it is a fact—a fact that proclaims the love of the Son of God. He poured out all the virtue within His eternal being for mankind.
b. The disciples were unaware of what it cost Jesus to minister. They were insensitive to the spiritual energy He was exerting. They were ignorant of what Jesus was doing:
“Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me shall never die. Believest thou this? She saith unto him, Yea, Lord: I believe that thou art the Christ, the Son of God, which should come into the world” ().
⇒ “Himself took our infirmities, and bore our sicknesses” (Mt. 8:17; see Is. 53:4).
⇒ He was teaching that public confession of Him was essential.
The disciples were somewhat surprised at Jesus’ question: “Who touched me?” He was completely surrounded by a mass of people. In their surprise, they asked Him why He was asking such a question in the midst of so many people. How could He possibly expect not to be touched?
“And the Lord shall deliver me from every evil work, and will preserve me [take me, transport me] unto his heavenly kingdom: to whom be glory for ever and ever” ().
c. The woman confessed. When Jesus asked the question, the woman came up to Jesus “fearing and trembling.” She had approached Him being unclean and had not requested permission to touch Him. But she had still been healed. Now she felt that she must respond to His question and identify herself lest He rebuke her and reject her faith. She feared that somehow her healing might be reversed if she did not confess that she had touched Him. So “knowing what was done in her, [she] came and fell down before Him, and told Him all the truth.” It was difficult and embarrassing, but she did it.
“Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven” (Mt. 10:32).
“Also I say unto you, Whosoever shall confess me before men, him shall the Son of man also confess before the angels of God” (Lu. 12:8).
3. There is not a scornful, skeptical attitude. The mourners laughed Jesus to scorn (see note, pt. 5— for a detailed discussion and thoughts).
5. The result is glorious. Jesus granted the request of the hopeless. “Daughter, thy faith hath made thee whole, go in peace, and be whole” (v. 34). The result was twofold. She received peace. The fear and trembling were taken away and she was flooded with peace. Second, she was made whole both physically and spiritually.
“Peace I leave with you, my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid” (Jn. 14:27).
When we become fed up, and go to God there is nothing anyone, any devil can do about it.
It was not the physical touch, but what was in the touch that touch Jesus.
This woman courage and faith touch Jesus.
4. There is an obedient attitude, an attitude that believes and follows Jesus. Note that the parents did exactly as Jesus said: they removed the guests and followed Jesus into the room where their dead daughter lay. They obeyed Him despite the scorn and skepticism of others.
This woman had faith.
“These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world” (Jn. 16:33).
Acronyms for Faith
Forsaking All I Trust Him
Forsaking All I Take Him
“And Jesus said unto the centurion, Go thy way; and as thou hast believed, so be it done unto thee. And his servant was healed in the selfsame hour” (Mt. 8:13).
For All Is Through Him
Fear Ain't In This House
Full Access In The Heaven
This woman touch Jesus, with her faith.
Have you touch Jesus, with your faith? ....
O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever.
This woman healing cost Jesus, but he has the power to pay it.
How i know he has the power to pay it.
He died one friday, got up on Sunday, with power.
Have you been touch?
Have you been Healed?
Have you ever been delivered?
YES! Wont he do! Want he wipe the tears from your eyes
Want he show up in trouble waters,
Want he heal ya
Want he deliver you.
I know he will, I know he will
Grace -
“Then touched he their eyes, saying, According to your faith be it unto you. And their eyes were opened; and Jesus straitly charged them, saying, See that no man know it” (Mt. 9:29–30).
Thought 1. A believing faith often requires bearing abuse, scorn, and persecution to follow Jesus. Conquering the impossible requires great faith, and often it requires standing all alone against everyone else.
“Jesus said unto him, If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth” (Mk. 9:23).
“Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life” (Jn. 5:24).
“That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation” (Ro. 10:9–10).
5. Jesus granted the believer’s request. Jesus demonstrated His great love and amazing power. He raised Jairus’ daughter. He showed that He cared for the man and the family who approached Him in belief and trust.
4 (5:35–43) Faith: the third scene is that of a ruler’s believing approach. This approach always lays hold of Jesus. Jesus knows when a person truly believes. A believing approach involves one simple attitude, but there are also several attitudes that it does not involve.
1. There is not a fearful, despairing attitude in faith. Believing has nothing to do with fear or despair.

Hymnal

a. Note the devastating circumstance that occurred. While Jesus was still talking with the woman, someone came from Jairus’ home with terrible news: his daughter was dead. Imagine the trauma—how Jairus felt. How anxious he must have felt with the pushing and shoving and slow movement of the crowd. How nervous he must have become as Jesus stopped to handle the matter with the hemorrhaging woman. If Jesus had just hurried, He could have reached his daughter in time. Jairus was devastated, crushed, fearful, and despairing. Now it was too late. He was helpless; all hope was gone.
All things come of Thee, O Lord, and of Thine own have we given Thee.
The family, of course, was amazed, as anyone would be. But note the thoughtfulness of Jesus. He told the family to tell no one what had really happened in order to protect them from an immediate onrush of sightseers. And He showed a tenderness by telling them to give their daughter something to eat.
b. Note: the challenge of Jesus is the answer to all fear and despair: “Be not afraid, only believe.” (See Deeper Study # 2—Mk. 5:36.)
2. There is not a wailing, whining attitude in faith. Believing has nothing to do with such an attitude. Society and others may engage in and encourage wailing and whining; they may feel and say that nothing can be done now, that all one can do is to bear up under the weight and tragedy of the loss.
However, the answer to any circumstance, mild or tragic, is not wailing and whining. The answer is Jesus’ comfort and assurance. Even if the circumstance is death, Jesus comforts and assures: “Why make ye this ado, and weep? The damsel is not dead, but sleepeth” (v. 39). There is hope of the resurrection, which is a living fact, a living event that is to take place soon. In addition, there is hope of eternal life, of never dying, of being transported into the very presence of God upon passing from this life (Jn. 5:24–29; 11:25–26. See Deeper Study # 1—2 Ti. 4:18.)
Thought 1. Stubborn faith is desperately needed by many parents in behalf of their children. However, note what must precede stubborn faith: a desperate faith that forgets and denies self and that seeks Jesus no matter the cost. Difficult cases require both a desperate faith and a stubborn faith. It is such faith that receives the great reward.
“Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that heareth my word, and believeth on him that sent me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life. Verily, verily, I say unto you, The hour is coming, and now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God: and they that hear shall live” (Jn. 5:24–25).
“Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me shall never die. Believest thou this? She saith unto him, Yea, Lord: I believe that thou art the Christ, the Son of God, which should come into the world” (Jn. 11:25–26).
“And the Lord shall deliver me from every evil work, and will preserve me [take me, transport me] unto his heavenly kingdom: to whom be glory for ever and ever” (2 Ti. 4:18).
“Verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you” (; see ).
3. There is not a scornful, skeptical attitude. The mourners laughed Jesus to scorn (see note, pt. 5—Mt. 9:23–26 for a detailed discussion and thoughts).
4. There is an obedient attitude, an attitude that believes and follows Jesus. Note that the parents did exactly as Jesus said: they removed the guests and followed Jesus into the room where their dead daughter lay. They obeyed Him despite the scorn and skepticism of others.
Thought 1. A believing faith often requires bearing abuse, scorn, and persecution to follow Jesus. Conquering the impossible requires great faith, and often it requires standing all alone against everyone else.
“And Jesus answering saith unto them, Have faith in God. For verily I say unto you, That whosoever shall say unto this mountain, Be thou removed, and be thou cast into the sea; and shall not doubt in his heart, but shall believe that those things which he saith shall come to pass; he shall have whatsoever he saith. Therefore I say unto you, What things soever ye desire, when ye pray, believe that ye receive them, and ye shall have them” ().
5. Jesus granted the believer’s request. Jesus demonstrated His great love and amazing power. He raised Jairus’ daughter. He showed that He cared for the man and the family who approached Him in belief and trust.
The family, of course, was amazed, as anyone would be. But note the thoughtfulness of Jesus. He told the family to tell no one what had really happened in order to protect them from an immediate onrush of sightseers. And He showed a tenderness by telling them to give their daughter something to eat.
Thought 1. Stubborn faith is desperately needed by many parents in behalf of their children. However, note what must precede stubborn faith: a desperate faith that forgets and denies self and that seeks Jesus no matter the cost. Difficult cases require both a desperate faith and a stubborn faith. It is such faith that receives the great reward.
“But when Jesus heard it, he answered him, saying, Fear not: believe only, and she shall be made whole” ().
“Verily I say unto you, If ye have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and nothing shall be impossible unto you” (Mt. 17:20; see Mt. 21:21).
“And Jesus answering saith unto them, Have faith in God. For verily I say unto you, That whosoever shall say unto this mountain, Be thou removed, and be thou cast into the sea; and shall not doubt in his heart, but shall believe that those things which he saith shall come to pass; he shall have whatsoever he saith. Therefore I say unto you, What things soever ye desire, when ye pray, believe that ye receive them, and ye shall have them” (Mk. 11:22–24).
“But when Jesus heard it, he answered him, saying, Fear not: believe only, and she shall be made whole” (Lu. 8:50).
“And they rose early in the morning, and went forth into the wilderness of Tekoa: and as they went forth, Jehoshaphat stood and said, Hear me, O Judah, and ye inhabitants of Jerusalem; Believe in the Lord your God, so shall ye be established; believe his prophets, so shall ye prosper” ().
“And they rose early in the morning, and went forth into the wilderness of Tekoa: and as they went forth, Jehoshaphat stood and said, Hear me, O Judah, and ye inhabitants of Jerusalem; Believe in the Lord your God, so shall ye be established; believe his prophets, so shall ye prosper” (2 Chr. 20:20).
DEEPER STUDY # 2
(5:36) Faith—Fear: fear is the opposite of belief. Believing God eliminates fear. Believing that God actually cares and will deliver one through any and all circumstances of life erases fear. If God does care, there is nothing to fear. However, if one does not believe that God cares, then fear is present. Why? Because there is no one beyond man to help, and man’s help is limited—very limited. There are many times in life when man’s help is not enough, or even close to being enough. Therefore for the unbelieving man, there are all kinds of things to fear: unfortunate circumstances, bad health, accident, loneliness, death, the loss of anything and everything—family, profession, friends, business, home.
Leadership Ministries Worldwide. (1996). The Gospel according to Mark (pp. 99–101). Chattanooga, TN: Leadership Ministries Worldwide.
DEEPER STUDY # 2
(5:36) Faith—Fear: fear is the opposite of belief. Believing God eliminates fear. Believing that God actually cares and will deliver one through any and all circumstances of life erases fear. If God does care, there is nothing to fear. However, if one does not believe that God cares, then fear is present. Why? Because there is no one beyond man to help, and man’s help is limited—very limited. There are many times in life when man’s help is not enough, or even close to being enough. Therefore for the unbelieving man, there are all kinds of things to fear: unfortunate circumstances, bad health, accident, loneliness, death, the loss of anything and everything—family, profession, friends, business, home.
Leadership Ministries Worldwide. (1996). The Gospel according to Mark (pp. 99–101). Chattanooga, TN: Leadership Ministries Worldwide.2) so we can see her wiliness.
As the movie draws to a conclusion, Celie finally stands up to Mister.
is that all of life would become “spiritual worship.”
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