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Exhausted on the Inside

Hebrews  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
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Weary - to gradually lose your motivation to accomplish some goal.
Fainthearted - from two words: soul & to be exhausted
To be exhausted on the inside, mentally, emotionally, spiritually just tired. That’s exactly where I am right now.
In this passage of Scripture God is saying to me and to you. In spite of the pain, in spite of the hardship, no matter what you’re going through, don’t quit on Jesus.
Context

I. Consider the endurance of the Lord. (Vv 3-4)

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Really think about all that Jesus went through. All the hostility he endured. Besides the physical abuse there was constant verbal abuse. He was ridiculed and reviled and he faced it all with courage. He didn’t withdraw from His mission. He is our model.
Verse 4: The sufferings of the community were insignificant in comparison with those endured by Jesus, His suffering were both quantitatively and qualitatively greater than theirs. Yet the members of the house church appeared to be on the verge of becoming weary and disheartened.
Verse 4. Sin equals all forms of hostility. We are to struggle against it, and resist. And here we are reminded that we have not yet done so to the point of death, as Jesus did. But that is what we are to do. Face hostility and hardship with courage until death.
Sin equals all forms of hostility. We are to struggle (exert strenuous effort) against it, and resist. And here we are reminded that we have not yet done so to the point of death, as Jesus did. But that is what we are to do. Face hostility and hardship with courage until death.
The sufferings of the community were insignificant in comparison with those endured by Jesus, His suffering were both quantitatively and qualitatively greater than theirs. Yet the members of the house church appeared to be on the verge of becoming weary and disheartened. Verse 4. Sin equals all forms of hostility. We are to struggle against it, and resist. And here we are reminded that we have not yet done so to the point of death, as Jesus did. But that is what we are to do. Face hostility and hardship with courage until death.

II. Remember the discipline of the Lord. (Vv 5-11)

To help us endure we are reminded that hostility and hardship are to be viewed as the discipline of our heavenly Father. Quoted is . This is not just a word from Solomon to his son. God intended this for all His children.

Discipline is evidence you are God’s child. (Vv 5-8)

Sometimes discipline is the result of wrongdoing. Sometimes not. But in both cases it is intended to teach and train children to improve their character and behavior. That’s why we shouldn’t regard it lightly (despise, dismiss). This is when you just want the pain to go away. You don’t care about learning or growing. You just want it all to be over. This is a wrong attitude because the pain is a sign we are being disciplined. And discipline is a sign that we are God’s children (V 6).
Verse 7: We have to endure because what we are going through is discipline. “God is treating you as sons.” If there were no discipline to teach and train us that would be a sign that we are not God’s children.

Discipline calls for submission. (V 9)

Verse 9: When we grow up we look back on the discipline we received as children. We realize that we have benefited from it. We know now that it was for our good. We are grateful to our parents. How much more then should we understand the need to endure the discipline of our perfect heavenly Father. We should be subject to Him. That means submit to the discipline we are undergoing.

Discipline produces righteousness. (Vv 10-11)

God disciplines us for our good, specifically that we may be holy (Christlike). Yes, discipline is painful. But for those who endure the training of discipline and don’t quit, the result is a harvest of peace and righteousness. The gain is worth the pain.
Hebrews 12:2 ESV
looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God.

Big Idea: Endure hostility and hardship as the discipline of your heavenly Father.

1. Confess that you’ve taken God’s discipline lightly.
2. Pray for God’s help to endure that you might learn and grow through your pain.
2. Reaffirm your commitment to Jesus.
Study Guide
How did discipline generally look in the home you grew up in? Do you agree or disagree with the way your parents disciplined you? Why?
How did discipline generally look in the home you grew up in? Do you agree or disagree with the way your parents disciplined you? Why?
Do you tend to think of discipline from God in a beneficial way? Why or why not?
Read verse 5? What might it look like to regard lightly the discipline of the Lord? What is that something we are warned against?
Read verses 10-11. What is the goal of God’s discipline? How does God’s discipline bring about this effect?
How do we tend to try to escape the discipline of God? How can we fight that tendency? What is the right perspective to have toward God’s discipline?
Can you relate to the idea of being exhausted on the inside? Describe what it feels like from your perspective? How is it a threat to our faith? How does the discussion of discipline relate to this?
How can you, individually and as a group, help those who are feeling exhausted on the inside?
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