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1 Peter 1 (2)

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God chosen

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Wednesday Bible study
LIVING IN HOPE
1
II.
LIVING IN SUBMISSION
2
III.
LIVING WITH SUFFERING
3–4
IV.
CLOSING EXHORTATIONS
Outline 2
God’s Grace in Salvation (1:3–2:10)
A. Living in hope (1:3–12)
B. Living in holiness (1:13–21)
C. Living in harmony (1:22–2:10)
A. Submission to authorities (2:11–17)
B. Submission to masters (2:18–25)
C. Submission in the home (3:1–7)
D. Submission in the church (3:8–12)
III. God’s Grace in Suffering (3:13–5:11)
A. Make Christ Lord of your life (3:13–22)
B. Have Christ’s attitude (4:1–11)
C. Glorify Christ’s name (4:12–19)
D. Look for Christ’s return (5:1–6)
E. Depend on Christ’s grace (5:7–11)
Date:
A.D. 64
Purpose for the Letter
First Peter was written to Christians who were experiencing various forms of persecution, men and women whose stand for Jesus Christ made them aliens and strangers in the midst of a pagan society. Peter exhorted these Christians to steadfast endurance and exemplary behavior.
Practical instructions make this epistle a unique source of encouragement for all believers who live in conflict with their culture.
The purpose then of 1 Peter was to encourage Christians to face persecution so that the true grace of Jesus Christ would be evidenced in them (5:12).
Message of:
The apostle of Hope
Called the “apostle of hope,” Peter’s primary message is to trust the Lord, live obediently no matter what your circumstances, and keep your hope fixed on God’s ultimate promise of deliverance.
Those who read 1 Peter are encouraged to lift their eyes from present problems and trials and behold the vistas provided by an eternal perspective. For though believers may for a while suffer grief in trials, they wait for an inheritance that can never perish, spoil, or fade.
Author of:
clearly identifies the author as “Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ.” His given name was Simon, but Jesus, on meeting him, said he would be called Cephas (). The Greek translation of the Aramaic word Cephas is “petros,” and the word in both languages means “stone” or “rock.” Jesus’ description of Simon’s future strength of character became his personal name. Interestingly he is the only man in the New Testament called Peter.
God’s Grace in Salvation (1:3–2:10)
I. Customary Salutation (1:1–2)
A. Identification of the author (1:1a)
B. Identification of those addressed (1:1b–2)
II. Chosen for New Birth (1:3–2:10)
A. The new birth’s living hope (1:3–12)
1. The future inheritance (1:3–5)
2. The present joy (1:6–9)
3. The past revelation (1:10–12)
I. Living in Hope
Customary Salutation (1:1–2)
A. Identification of the author (1:1a)
Peter’s release from prison (), he brought the gospel to these areas. At the same time
1. Jesus Changed Simons name to Peter, rock man
2. Peter was not The Rock, Jesus is the cornerstone
B. Identification of those addressed (1:1b–2)
The readers were scattered throughout Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, sprinkled like salt throughout five of Asia Minor’s Roman provinces.
“Scattered” (diasporas) had special meaning to the Jewish Christians in these churches. The diaspora referred to Jews who were separated from their homeland
The diaspora referred to Jews who were separated from their homeland.
The Jewish and Gentile readers live in five districts of Asia Minor: Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia.
1. Today Christian can claim they are “God Chosen”
2. At one time that was only Israel had that title.
3. Christians are God’s elect not by chance or human design but by God’s sovereign, unconditional choice. Once only the nation of Israel could claim this title.
4. The Chosen are now “strangers in the world”
5. But you are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God, that you may declare the praises of him who called you out of darkness into his wonderful light” (2:9).
6. , temporary residence Don’t take the evils from the world
7. Christians are resident aliens in this world (). They are not at home in this world, for their stay on earth is temporary ()
8. , your home is in heaven, the Christians true home
3. The sanctifying work of the Spirit
has set these chosen ones apart for service, putting God’s choice and purpose into effect. The result of the Spirit’s work is obedience … and sprinkling by His blood. “Obedience” (hypakoēn, from hypakouō, “to hear under, to hearken”) is man’s responsibility to be submissive to God’s Word (cf. ; ; ; ). One living in obedience is constantly being cleansed with Christ’s blood and is thus “set apart” from the world
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