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Notice that in this passage Mark three times uses the descriptive term great or enormous. The Latin translation uses the word magna and the Greek employs the term mega. Both of these terms clearly have reference to things that are large.
Mark first uses this term to describe the tempest that struck the boat carrying Jesus and His disciples (v. 37). It was not just a storm, it was a mega-storm, an enormous tempest that surpassed the usual maelstroms that came down on the Sea of Galilee. It threatened the lives of the disciples, for it raised waves that both beat on the boat and sloshed over its gunwales, so that it took on large amounts of water. It was at that point that the disciples went to their Master, woke Him, and said, “Please do something or we’re going to perish.”
When Jesus rebuked the wind and the sea, Mark tells us, the mega-storm turned into a mega-calm (v. 39). Great violence was instantly transformed into great peace.
However, it is Mark’s third use of the term mega in this passage that interests me most. Mark uses it to describe the fear of the disciples (v. 41). He says that they “feared exceedingly.”
Notice the progress of the disciples’ fear. When the storm came up, they were intimidated. But when the storm was calmed, their fear intensified. Their greatest fear came after the threatening storm had been removed. We dare not miss the significance of this in the lives of the disciples, for the intensification of their fear is their response to a new depth of understanding about the person of Christ.
Sproul, R. C. (2011). Mark (First Edition, p. 92). Orlando, FL: Reformation Trust.
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