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1 Timothy 6

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Final instructions from Paul to Timothy

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Introduction**

This morning we are in chapter 6 … completing our study through 1 Timothy.
And next week we won’t be doing “The Gospel According to the Shack” or “Mr. Rogers and God.”
No, we’re going to stick with our verse by verse trek through the Bible, so we’ll be starting 2 Timothy.

Because we deviated from our current study through 1 Timothy for Resurrection Sunday, let’s spend a few minutes reviewing where we are with chapter 6.

In chapter 1, Paul took some time to encourage Timothy in his calling and to address some doctrinal concerns.
Then, in chapter 2, Paul addressed etiquette and gender roles in the church.
In chapter 3, Paul again addresses solidifying church structure by addressing leadership.
With chapter 4, Paul addressed some who left the faith by exchanging the good doctrines of the Bible for personal agenda and personal gain … false teachers and false doctrines.
And in chapter 5, Paul addressed some important social relationships and the proper treatment of church members.
This chapter continues Paul’s advice to Timothy on ministering to the various kinds of believers in the church, but also turns again to defending the faith, and not turning to the right or left, but holding to the confession of faith for a good testimony before others.
----
In the very first days of the church, apostasy was not an issue … they continued in the apostles doctrine.
But … the church was made up of sinners saved by grace, from various walks of life … and as such, needs arose.
This first church sought to care for the needs of the congregation.

So the church sought to help to fill in the gaps with a daily distribution of food … possibly in the form of a meal being served.

Perhaps they were right or maybe it was just a matter of perception … … but the hellenistic widows (those of Greek culture) felt that they were receiving less than the Hebrew widows (those of Jewish culture).So, records that deacons were selected so that the Apostles’ would not be juggling the responsibilities of prayer and ministry of the Word and trying to meet the physical needs of the church.----
30 or so years later, the church had grown dramatically and was no longer only in Jerusalem.
There were individual churches throughout the towns and cities of Asia Minor, Greece, Macedonia, Phoenicia, Samaria, Judea, Europe … possibly as far west as Spain and even up into England.
Many different people from many different backgrounds were now joined together in this called out group that is the Body of Christ.
And many people not just from varying cultures, but in different walks of their life … some old, some young, married, unmarried, widowed, rich, poor, free, and even slaves.

Well, in Chapter 5, Paul gave practical advice on how church members of different walks of life should be treated.

And for part of our chapter for today, Paul continues on this theme.

But he soon switches back to defending the faith from those who twist the gospel for personal gain.
Now, we’ve noted already how Paul used military terms in this letter.
“Charge” … “wage warfare” and so forth.
He continues to do that as he wraps up this letter.

The Apostle uses words like: “Fight the good fight of faith” ().

“I give thee charge” (, which is the same military term used in 1:3).

“Command those that are rich” ().

“Guard what was committed to your trust” ().

Paul was like the General of an army receiving orders from the Commander in Chief and passing them on to Timothy.
In turn Timothy was to pass them on to the church he pastored.
That is my job as well.
And it’s not a job that changes over time or that is being redefined or reformed by “New Apostles.”
But it’s the same job today that it was then, just as the doctrines of scripture are the same today as they were then.
Timothy was to charge, urge, command, guard, fight, and commit and that is the job of the pastor today … teaching the Word of God without compromise.
----
D.L. Moody did not want his soloist, Ira Sankey, to use “Onward, Christian Soldiers” in their evangelistic campaigns. Moody felt that the church he saw was very un like an army. If the average military man on our side in World War II had behaved toward his superiors and their orders the way the average Christian behaves toward the Lord, we probably would have lost the war! Instead of “Onward, Christian Soldiers,” someone has suggested that perhaps we ought to sing “Backward, Christian Soldiers.”
Paul instructed Timothy how to minister to four more groups in the church, and also how to keep his own life in the will of God.
----

We start out our chapter with Paul addressing a subset of believers that might surprise us … slaves.

Among the many believers from many different walks of life that would be in the early church, some were slaves.

Some historians have estimated that half of the population of the Roman Empire was composed of slaves.
Many of these people were well educated and from good families … accountants and physicians were often slaves.
Some were slaves due to debt, some due to punishment, some were children who were abandoned and others were born into it.
But legally they were not considered persons at all.
No matter how skilled or educated, legally slaves were not considered persons under the law.
Their living conditions were difficult and often brutal … abuse was not uncommon and a slave could be tortured or executed.
It is no wonder that the Great Gospel Message of “salvation” and “freedom in Christ” appealed to slaves.
And many who were slaves became believers.
(The word translated “servant” in the kjvNew Testament usually means “slave.”)
When slaves were able to get away from their duties, they would fellowship in local assemblies where being a slave was not a handicap.
Paul told the Galatian believers:
Galatians 3:28 NKJV
There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus.
What a comfort and joy it must have been for a Roman or Greek slave to walk into church and be among not masters, but brothers and sisters in Christ.
But it’s also a relief that we can enjoy today.
Though we are not slaves as so many were in years past, we are so often “chained” like Lot to an immoral and godless society that grieves us.
But we can come here and be refreshed in fellowship and sharing in God’s Word.

That being said, in the church that Timothy was pastoring, there was a problem that Paul needed to address.

Some slaves had masters who were believers.
This was confusing to both the master and the slave … how did their faith change this?
Others who had unbelieving masters used their newfound freedom in Christ as an excuse to disobey, if not defy, their masters.
Some who were slaves used their newfound freedom in Christ as an excuse to disobey, if not defy, their masters.
After all, in Christ, weren’t they no longer slaves?
Paul needed to instruct Timothy in how to deal with this, because rebellious attitudes were a bad testimony of Christ.
So, we pick it up with that in mind.
They needed to learn that their spiritual freedom in Christ did not alter their social position, even though they were accepted graciously into the fellowship of the church.
But first, let’s pray for God’s direction and wisdom in our study:
Prayer: Heavenly Father, as we approach Your Word together this morning, we ask for your guidance and wisdom. Give us open ears and open hearts that we may be established in all good things through the study of Your written Word. May the words of my mouth and the meditation of our hearts be acceptable in Your sight. We pray these things in Jesus’ name. Amen.

V1-2

Paul is not endorsing slavery in these verses.

He is addressing a reality that existed at that time.

The Greek word that the NKJV translates as bondservants is δοῦλος Doulos.
A doulos is a slave.
In Roman times, the term bondservant or slave could refer to someone who voluntarily served others.
But it usually referred to one who was held in a permanent position of servitude, as it does here.
Some believing slaves had believing masters and most had unbelieving masters.
So then, the question … What were they to do now that they were free in Christ?
To put it quite simply, they were to act in a way that would bring glory to Christ, “Lest the name of God and the teaching be slandered.”
What were they to do now that they were free in Christ?
lest the name of God and the teaching be slandered.
They were to act in a way that would bring glory to Christ ‘so that God’s name and our teaching may not be slandered’
They would do this by showing respect to their masters.
No Christian master would consider his slaves “under the yoke,” but would treat them with love and respect (; ). For a slave to rebel against an unsaved master would bring disgrace on the Gospel. “The name of God” and His doctrine would be blasphemed (). This is one reason Paul and the early missionaries did not go around preaching against the sinful institution of slavery. Such a practice would have branded the church as a militant group trying to undermine the social order, and the progress of the Gospel would have been greatly hindered.
No Christian master would consider his slaves “under the yoke,” but would treat them with love and respect (; ). For a slave to rebel against an unsaved master would bring disgrace on the Gospel. “The name of God” and His doctrine would be blasphemed (). This is one reason Paul and the early missionaries did not go around preaching against the sinful institution of slavery. Such a practice would have branded the church as a militant group trying to undermine the social order, and the progress of the Gospel would have been greatly hindered.
No Christian master would consider his slaves “under the yoke,” but would treat them with love and respect (; ). For a slave to rebel against an unsaved master would bring disgrace on the Gospel. “The name of God” and His doctrine would be blasphemed (). This is one reason Paul and the early missionaries did not go around preaching against the sinful institution of slavery. Such a practice would have branded the church as a militant group trying to undermine the social order, and the progress of the Gospel would have been greatly hindered.
No Christian master would consider his slaves “under the yoke,” but would treat them with love and respect (; ). For a slave to rebel against an unsaved master would bring disgrace on the Gospel. “The name of God” and His doctrine would be blasphemed (). This is one reason Paul and the early missionaries did not go around preaching against the sinful institution of slavery. Such a practice would have branded the church as a militant group trying to undermine the social order, and the progress of the Gospel would have been greatly hindered.
They would do so by showing respect to their masters.
No Christian master would consider his slaves “under the yoke,” but would treat them with love and respect (; ). For a slave to rebel against an unsaved master would bring disgrace on the Gospel. “The name of God” and His doctrine would be blasphemed (). This is one reason Paul and the early missionaries did not go around preaching against the sinful institution of slavery. Such a practice would have branded the church as a militant group trying to undermine the social order, and the progress of the Gospel would have been greatly hindered.

Paul taught in Colossians that a Christian master was to treat slaves with love and respect.

Colossians 4:1 NKJV
Masters, give your bondservants what is just and fair, knowing that you also have a Master in heaven.
Philemon 16 NKJV
no longer as a slave but more than a slave—a beloved brother, especially to me but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord.
And to Philemon, Paul wrote on behalf of the runaway, believing slave Onesimus, “Receive him forever, no longer as a slave but more than a slave—a beloved brother, especially to me but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord.”
Do not read below:
Philemon 15–16 NKJV
For perhaps he departed for a while for this purpose, that you might receive him forever, no longer as a slave but more than a slave—a beloved brother, especially to me but how much more to you, both in the flesh and in the Lord.
Philemon
When a master and a slave are both believers, their relationship has changed … they have become brothers.
The danger here is that a Christian slave might take advantage of his master because both are saved.
He might rightfully say, “My master is my brother!”
And wrongfully conclude, “Since we are equal, he has no right to tell me what to do!”
This attitude would create serious problems both in the homes and in the churches.
Christian Masters like Christian employers were to do right by their servants because they themselves have a master, Who is Christ.
They will answer to Christ for how they treated others.
But Paul is speaking here to Timothy in regards to instructions for slaves.
Likewise, believing slaves (whether in a Christian household or not) who became disrespectful to their masters were a bad witness.
There are several reasons both of these negative situations would be a bad witness:
Unbelievers wouldn’t see Christian love … what they would see is the same thing they are used to seeing.
What then, they would conclude, is the difference?
A believing slave who rebelled against an unsaved master or a believing master who abused a slave would bring disgrace on the Gospel.
So, Paul tells Timothy to teach them to work even harder, ‘because those who benefit from their service are believers, and dear to them.’
For a believing slave to rebel against an unsaved master would bring disgrace on the Gospel.
For a slave to rebel against an unsaved master would bring disgrace on the Gospel.
This is one reason Paul and the early missionaries did not go around preaching against the sinful institution of slavery. Such a practice would have branded the church as a militant group trying to undermine the social order, and the progress of the Gospel would have been greatly hindered.
The Bible Exposition Commentary Chapter Six: Orders from Headquarters (1 Timothy 6)

Some historians have estimated that half of the population of the Roman Empire was composed of slaves. Many of these people were educated and cultured, but legally they were not considered persons at all. The Gospel message of salvation and freedom in Christ appealed to the slaves, and many of them became believers. (The word translated “servant” in the KJVNew Testament usually means “slave.”) When slaves were able to get away from their household duties, they would fellowship in local assemblies where being a slave was not a handicap (Gal. 3:28).

But there was a problem: Some slaves used their newfound freedom in Christ as an excuse to disobey, if not defy, their masters. They needed to learn that their spiritual freedom in Christ did not alter their social position, even though they were accepted graciously into the fellowship of the church.

But there was a problem: Some slaves used their newfound freedom in Christ as an excuse to disobey, if not defy, their masters. They needed to learn that their spiritual freedom in Christ did not alter their social position, even though they were accepted graciously into the fellowship of the church.
There is a mutual blessing when Christians serve each other in the will of God.
Paul gave three reasons why Christian slaves should show respect for their believing masters and not take advantage of them. The most obvious reason is: Their masters are Christians (“faithful”=believing). How can one believer take advantage of another believer? Second, their masters are beloved. Love does not rebel or look for opportunities to escape responsibility. Finally, both master and servant benefit from obedience (“partakers of the benefit” can apply to both of them). There is a mutual blessing when Christians serve each other in the will of God.
But the question we may have is, “How is ‘The name of God and the teaching slandered’ when Christian servants or employees are rebellious or disrespectful?
the name of God and the teaching be slandered.
“I thought it was going to be heaven on earth,” she complained. “Instead, there are nothing but problems.”
Well, the Bible has a great deal to say about servanthood.
“Are you working just as hard for your Christian boss as you did for your other boss?” I asked. The look on her face gave me the answer. “Try working harder,” I advised, “and show him real respect. Just because all of you in the office are saved doesn’t mean you can do less than your best.” She took my advice and her problems cleared up.
That is because the central theme of the Bible is the Servant of all—Jesus Christ.
Jesus, in addressing 2 of His disciples in said:
Mark 10:45 NKJV
For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.”

Earlier in the Gospel of Mark, His disciples were arguing about who would be the greatest.

He said to them, “If anyone desires to be first, he shall be last of all and servant of all.”
Do not read below:
Mark 9:35 NKJV
And He sat down, called the twelve, and said to them, “If anyone desires to be first, he shall be last of all and servant of all.”
Mark 9:35 NKJV
And He sat down, called the twelve, and said to them, “If anyone desires to be first, he shall be last of all and servant of all.”
When Jesus is Lord of our lives, His lordship will be expressed in the way we love and serve others.
Peter wrote:
Mark 9:35 NKJV
And He sat down, called the twelve, and said to them, “If anyone desires to be first, he shall be last of all and servant of all.”
1 Peter 4:10 NKJV
As each one has received a gift, minister it to one another, as good stewards of the manifold grace of God.
“For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many” (). When we give Jesus Christ His rightful place as Lord of our lives, His lordship will be expressed in the way we serve others (; ; ). How can we demonstrate love for God? Our love for God will be expressed in our love for others. “For what we preach is not ourselves, but Jesus Christ as Lord, with ourselves as your servants for Jesus’ sake” ().
John 15:12–13 NKJV
This is My commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends.
And Jesus commanded that we, “Love one another as [He] has loved [us].”
Don’t read below:
John 15:12–13 NKJV
This is My commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends.

A large part of our testimony to the unsaved, but also to one another, is how we love and serve one another.

When we are in rebellion to the authority God has placed us under, we are preaching ourselves.
But when we submit to the authority which God has ordained in our lives, then we are preaching Christ, “For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that you should follow His steps.”
1 Peter 2:21 NKJV
For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that you should follow His steps:
1 Peter 2:
Paul wrote to the Corinthians:
As Paul wrote to the Corinthians:
2 Corinthians 4:5 ESV
For what we proclaim is not ourselves, but Jesus Christ as Lord, with ourselves as your servants for Jesus’ sake.
2 Corinthians 4:5 NKJV
For we do not preach ourselves, but Christ Jesus the Lord, and ourselves your bondservants for Jesus’ sake.
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----

Paul had opened this letter with warnings about false teachers and false doctrines.

He touched back on the subject again in chapter 4.

Now, here in chapter 6 he exposes a major reason people teach falsely and others accept false teaching … discontentment.
The spiritual leaders in the local church must constantly oversee what is being taught because it is easy for false doctrines to slip in (). A pastor I know discovered a Sunday School teacher who was sharing his “visions” instead of teaching God’s Word!
The Bible Exposition Commentary Chapter Six: Orders from Headquarters (1 Timothy 6)

Paul had opened this letter with warnings about false teachers (1 Tim. 1:3ff), and had even refuted some of their dangerous teachings (1 Tim. 4:1ff). The spiritual leaders in the local church must constantly oversee what is being taught because it is easy for false doctrines to slip in (Acts 20:28–32). A pastor I know discovered a Sunday School teacher who was sharing his “visions” instead of teaching God’s Word!

V3-5

Paul now returns to the topic of false teachers and false doctrines.

As Paul draws the letter to a close, he returns to the people who have been bringing wrong ideas into the church in Ephesus.
He is addressing the people who have been bringing wrong ideas into the church in Ephesus.
As Paul draws the letter to a close, he returns to the people who have been bringing wrong ideas into the church in Ephesus.

These verses contain a blunt warning about the damage that false teachers and false doctrines were capable of causing.

Verse 3 says that they did not ‘agree with the “wholesome” words of our Lord Jesus Christ and the doctrine that accords with godliness’ (v. 3).
Other translations use the word “sound” … it’s the Greek word ὑγιαίνω hygiainō (hoo-ee-ay-no).
It’s a medical word meaning ‘healthy.’
We saw the word earlier in 1 Timothy and we’ll see it again early in 2 Timothy, where Paul writes:
2 Timothy 1:13–14 NKJV
Hold fast the pattern of sound words which you have heard from me, in faith and love which are in Christ Jesus. That good thing which was committed to you, keep by the Holy Spirit who dwells in us.
In the text of our chapter, Paul uses hygiainō (hoo-ee-ay-no) to draw contrast with the new teachers who he says are ‘obsessed with disputes and arguments over words.’
is obsessed with disputes and arguments over words
The Lexham English Bible (a very literal translation) puts it this way: “Having a morbid interest concerning controversies and disputes about words.”
Don’t read below:
1 Timothy 6:4 LEB
he is conceited, understanding nothing, but having a morbid interest concerning controversies and disputes about words, from which come envy, strife, slanders, evil suspicions,
a morbid interest concerning controversies and disputes about word

In the text here, Paul gives a very revealing picture of the typical false teacher … a teacher of “new things” is the implication of Paul’s words.

The first mark is that they refused to adhere to “the sound instruction of our Lord Jesus Christ and to godly teaching” (, niv). This teaching is godly and it promotes godliness. Isaiah’s first test of any teacher was, “To the Law and to the testimony: if they speak not according to this word, it is because there is no light in them” (). It is important that a church “hold fast the form of sound [healthy] words” ().
The first clue is in verse 3 and it is that they refused to adhere to, “The sound words of our Lord Jesus Christ and the teaching that is in accordance with godliness.” (Lexham English Bible)
the sound words
d Characterization of our Lord Jesus Christ
e Continuation (3a-3b) and the teaching that is in accordance with godliness,
It bothers me a lot when a Pastor or teacher says, “In these final days God is speaking something new and fresh to us” or something along those lines.
This teaching is godly and it promotes godliness. Isaiah’s first test of any teacher was, “To the Law and to the testimony: if they speak not according to this word, it is because there is no light in them” (). It is important that a church “hold fast the form of sound [healthy] words” ().
When I hear that, I immediately think I might be listening to a false teacher.
God’s Word is full and complete … we have it before us and it testifies of God’s Son, Jesus, and all His work on our behalf.
The Old Testament speaks of it, the New Testament speaks of it and when a false teacher tries to add to it, it distracts and takes away from it.
Whenever someone says, “I have a new revelation from God to share,” compare what is said to what the Word of God says.
Compare what is said to what the Word of God says. If it contradicts the Bible, throw it out.
If it contradicts the Bible, throw it out … it is not “sound” … it is not “healthy.”
Many times those who say they have a new revelation from God to share, bring a message that does not hold up to what God has already said.

God will not contradict Himself and His Word will not fail.

So then, if God is speaking , how could it ever be inaccurate?

God does not conform to any standard … He is the standard.

If God speaking, how could it ever be inaccurate?
a Major League Baseball player may get into the Hall of Fame for batting .300, but anyone claiming to be a prophet lands themselves in the Hall of Shame for the same average. If God speaking, how could it ever be inaccurate?
Compare what is said to what the Word of God says. If it contradicts the Bible, throw it out.
And He does not stand on anyone else’s word … He stands on His own word.
Isaiah’s first test of any teacher was, “To the Law and to the testimony: if they speak not according to this word, it is because there is no light in them.”
Do not read below:
Isaiah 8:20 NKJV
To the law and to the testimony! If they do not speak according to this word, it is because there is no light in them.
As we noted a few minutes ago, it is important that a church, “Hold fast the form of sound [healthy] words” ().
2 Timothy 1:13 NKJV
Hold fast the pattern of sound words which you have heard from me, in faith and love which are in Christ Jesus.
A second mark is the teacher’s own attitude.
A second mark is the teacher’s own attitude.

Instead of being humble, a false teacher is proud.

And yet he has nothing to be proud about because, as Paul says in verse 4, he does not know anything.
He is himself deceived, deceiving others.
As Paul said in verse 5, they are, “Men of corrupt minds and destitute of the truth.”
men of corrupt minds and destitute of the truth
The heart of the problem is that they are ‘men of corrupt mind, who have been robbed of the truth’ (v. 5, NIV).
The heart of the problem is that they are ‘men of corrupt mind, who have been robbed of the truth’ (v. 5, NIV).
The heart of the problem is that they are ‘men of corrupt mind, who have been robbed of the truth’ (v. 5, NIV). When Paul gave his farewell address to the elders of the church in Ephesus, he warned them that ‘fierce wolves [would] come in among [them], not sparing the flock; and from among [their] own selves [would] arise men speaking twisted things, to draw away the disciples after them’ (, italics mine). These were the same men who were causing Timothy such problems
When Paul gave his farewell address to the elders of the church in Ephesus, records that he warned them that, “Fierce wolves [would] come in among [them], not sparing the flock; and from among [their] own selves [would] arise men speaking twisted things, to draw away the disciples after them.”
Do not read below:
Acts 20:29–30 NKJV
For I know this, that after my departure savage wolves will come in among you, not sparing the flock. Also from among yourselves men will rise up, speaking perverse things, to draw away the disciples after themselves.
These were the same men who were causing Timothy such problems.
----
Another mark of these false teachers is their arrogance and narcissism .

This attitude causes a teacher to argue about minor matters, Paul says, concerning “words” ().

What does this mean?
This “conceited attitude” causes a teacher to argue about minor matters concerning “words” ().
Are we talking about tomato/tomahto/potato/potahto?
The proper pronunciation of Tetelestai or whether we should use Jesus or Yeshuah or Resurrection Sunday or Easter.
The literal Greek translates to “word battles.”
Instead of feeding on the “healthy words of … Christ,” the False Teacher gets sick and makes others sick over arguments and questions.
He brings up doubtful things and pursues quarrels in order to elevate himself and seek after financial gain.
He might take things from apocryphal books or even fables and then cause people to ask, “Why are we not hearing this from the pulpit?”
The simple answer is they should not be taught from the pulpit because they are questionable things.
The tragedy of all this is that the people are “robbed of the truth” (, niv) while they think they are discovering the truth! They think that the weekly arguments in their meetings, during which they exchange their ignorance, are a means of growing in grace; meanwhile the result is a loss of character, not an improvement.
The pulpit is the place for God’s Word to be taught.
It is not the place for fables or man made doctrines.
When the pulpit is used for these kinds of things, people are “robbed of the truth” while they think they are discovering the truth!
They think that the weekly arguments in their meetings, during which they exchange their ignorance, are a means of growing in grace; meanwhile the result is a loss of character, not an improvement.

v6-10

The Greek word for godliness is εὐσέβεια Eusebeia (ehv-sehv-iah).

This word for “Godliness” is found in the N.T. only in the pastoral epistles and in 2 Peter.

Godliness (eusebes) is found in the N.T. only in the pastorals and in 2 Peter. It suggests a reverent faith which expresses its awe of God in glad obedience to Him.

It suggests “a reverent faith which expresses its awe of God in glad obedience to Him.”

Godliness (eusebes) is found in the N.T. only in the pastorals and in 2 Peter. It suggests a reverent faith which expresses its awe of God in glad obedience to Him.
These false teachers supposed, “That godliness is a way of financial gain” (that is a literal translation of verse 6).
These false teachers supposed “that godliness is a way of financial gain” (literal translation). “Godliness” here () means “the profession of Christian faith” and not true holy living in the power of the Spirit. They used their religious profession as a means to make money. What they did was not a true ministry; it was just a religious business.
In other words, they disguised themselves in godliness, but their real motive was greed driven by discontentment.
They used their religious profession as a means to make money off the backs of those they deceived.
Glad we don’t see this kind of thing anymore, right? HA!
They wanted to
No really … it’s a tragedy to see Con-Men using Christianity to prey on gullible people, preaching doctrines of demons while stealing their money.
Yet, as we saw in chapter 5, Paul said that Men who devoted themselves full-time to the work of the Lord deserved some kind of compensation.
Yet, as we saw in chapter 5, Paul said that Men who devoted themselves full-time to the work of the Lord deserved some kind of compensation.
1 Timothy 5:17 NKJV
Let the elders who rule well be counted worthy of double honor, especially those who labor in the word and doctrine.
1 Timothy 5:17 NKJV
Let the elders who rule well be counted worthy of double honor, especially those who labor in the word and doctrine.
1 Timothy
If pastors are faithful in feeding people, “The Word and Doctrine,” then the church ought to be faithful and pay them adequately.
1 Timothy 5:
If pastors are faithful in feeding the people “The Word and Doctrine,” then the church ought to be faithful and pay them adequately.
----
To warn Timothy (and us) about the dangers of covetousness, Paul shared 4 facts:
Wealth does not bring contentment (v. 6)
Wealth is not lasting (v. 7)
Our basic needs are easily met (v. 8)
The desire for wealth leads to sin (vv. 9–10)
The Greek word that is translated contentment means “enough; sufficiency.”
It describes an inner sufficiency that keeps us at peace no matter the circumstance.
Paul used this same word in his letter to the Philippian believers.
There he said, “For I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, to be content” ().
Philippians 4:11 NKJV
Not that I speak in regard to need, for I have learned in whatever state I am, to be content:

True contentment comes from godliness in the heart.

It never comes from an abundance of money in the wallet.

A person who depends on material things for peace and assurance will never be satisfied.
That is because material things have a way of losing their appeal in a short while.
New homes grow old, new cars are soon in the shop.
So, wealth doesn’t bring contentment, nor does wealth last.
Paul says in verse 7, “It is certain we can carry nothing out.”
Job put it this way:
Wealth is not lasting (v. 7). I like to translate this verse: “We brought nothing into this world because we can carry nothing out” (see ). When someone’s spirit leaves his body at death, it can take nothing with it because, when that person came into the world at birth, he brought nothing with him. Whatever wealth we amass goes to the government, our heirs, and perhaps charity and the church. We always know the answer to the question, “How much did he leave?” Everything!
Job 1:21 NKJV
And he said: “Naked I came from my mother’s womb, And naked shall I return there. The Lord gave, and the Lord has taken away; Blessed be the name of the Lord.”
When the spirit leaves the body at death, nothing goes with it because, when that person came into the world at birth, he brought nothing with him.
When someone’s spirit leaves his body at death, it can take nothing with it because, when that person came into the world at birth, he brought nothing with him. Whatever wealth we amass goes to the government, our heirs, and perhaps charity and the church. We always know the answer to the question, “How much did he leave?” Everything!
When someone’s spirit leaves his body at death, it can take nothing with it because, when that person came into the world at birth, he brought nothing with him. Whatever wealth we amass goes to the government, our heirs, and perhaps charity and the church. We always know the answer to the question, “How much did he leave?” Everything!
Whatever wealth we accumulate goes to the government and our heirs … if we have made arrangements, some might go to the church.
So, we always know the answer to the question, “How much did he leave?”
Well, he left Everything!
With verse 8, Paul addresses basic needs and says they are easily met.
The Greek word for “clothing” here, σκέπασμα Skepasma (SKEP-pasmah) means “covering” and can mean both clothing and shelter.
Whether Paul means just clothing or both clothing and shelter is hard to say, but being a tent maker, I’m inclined to believe he meant both.

Food and covering are basic needs.

Opening Up 1 Timothy Cultivating Contentment (vv. 7–8)

When we are content, we are satisfied with having the basic necessities of life (v. 8). Rather than being driven by a desire to accumulate money and possessions, our greatest aim is to please God

When we are content, we are satisfied with having the basic necessities of life.

Some people are so concerned with the things they don’t need that they
Rather than being driven by a desire to accumulate money and possessions, our greatest aim is to please God
When we are content, we are satisfied with having the basic necessities of life (v. 8). Rather than being driven by a desire to accumulate money and possessions, our greatest aim is to please God
When we are content, we are satisfied with having the basic necessities of life (v. 8). Rather than being driven by a desire to accumulate money and possessions, our greatest aim is to please God
Robinson, S. J. (2004). Opening up 1 Timothy (p. 114). Leominster: Day One Publications.
I am reminded of the simple-living Quaker who was watching his new neighbor move in, with all of the furnishings and expensive “toys” that “successful people” collect. The Quaker finally went over to his new neighbor and said, “Neighbor, if ever thou dost need anything, come to see me, and I will tell thee how to get along without it.”
Henry David Thoreau said that, “A man is wealthy in proportion to the number of things he can afford to do without.”
The economic and energy crises that the world faces will probably be used by God to encourage people to simplify their lives. Too many of us know the “price of everything and the value of nothing.” We are so glutted with luxuries that we have forgotten how to enjoy our necessities.
The great issue that Paul is dealing with we find in verse 9 and 10.
It is this that
Basically, the desire for wealth leads to sin (vv. 9–10).
The desire for wealth leads to sin (vv. 9–10). “They that will be rich,” is the accurate translation. It describes a person who has to have more and more material things in order to be happy and feel successful. But riches are a trap; they lead to bondage, not freedom. Instead of giving satisfaction, riches create additional lusts (desires); and these must be satisfied. Instead of providing help and health, an excess of material things hurts and wounds. The result Paul described very vividly: “Harmful desires … plunge men into ruin and destruction” (, niv). It is the picture of a man drowning! He trusted his wealth and “sailed along,” but the storm came and he sank.
A very literal translation of these verses reads:
1 Timothy 6:9–10 LEB
But those who want to be rich fall into temptation and a trap and many foolish and harmful desires, which plunge those people into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is a root of all evil, by which some, because they desire it, have gone astray from the faith and have pierced themselves with many pains.

Paul warns Timothy that the desire to acquire wealth is dangerous.

Paul warns Timothy that the desire to acquire wealth is dangerous. It presents people with the temptation to do something sinful to bring about financial gain. It will be ‘a snare’ to trap them and it will lead them into

It presents people with the temptation to do something sinful to bring about financial gain.

AND it will be ‘a snare’ to trap them and it will lead them into ruin and destruction.
Instead of giving satisfaction, riches create additional desires that demand to be satisfied.
“They that will be rich,” is the accurate translation. It describes a person who has to have more and more material things in order to be happy and feel successful. But riches are a trap; they lead to bondage, not freedom. Instead of giving satisfaction, riches create additional lusts (desires); and these must be satisfied. Instead of providing help and health, an excess of material things hurts and wounds. The result Paul described very vividly: “Harmful desires … plunge men into ruin and destruction” (, niv). It is the picture of a man drowning! He trusted his wealth and “sailed along,” but the storm came and he sank.
Instead of providing help and health, the excess of material things hurts and wounds.
And this ties in to what Paul is warning about the false teachers.
They are not motivated by godliness and a desire to please God.
They are motivated by the desire to meet their own lusts for more and more.
The more one has, the more one will want.
The basic problem with this drive is that it is never satisfied; the more one has, the more one will want.
And that leads false teachers to ever increasing doctrinal error in order to continue to bring in more and more to themselves.
The basic problem with this drive is that it is never satisfied; the more one has, the more one will want.
And because
The servant of God should not ask, “How much will I get?” but rather “How much can I give?”
That would make him a “hireling,” and not a true shepherd ().
----
The servant of God should not ask, “How much will I get?” but rather “How much can I give?”
Before we move on, let me go back to verse 10 because it’s one of those verses that get’s quoted wrongly so often.

Verse 10 does not say that “MONEY is the root of ALL evil,” or even that “the LOVE OF MONEY is THE root of ALL evil;” but that the love of money is “A root of of evil.”

Verse 10 does not teach that money is the root of all evil, or even that the love of money is the root of all evil; but that the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil. Money itself is not neutral; it is basically defiled. Jesus called money “unrighteous mammon” (, ), and Paul called it “filthy lucre” (, ; , ). Money can be invested for eternity by bringing Christ to lost people, or it can send a man to hell by becoming his god. You find both examples in . Every one of the Ten Commandments can be broken because of money. Because of a desire for money, people have denied God, blasphemed His name, stolen, lied, murdered, committed adultery, and so on. A lust for material things makes people wander (err) from the faith, and this leads to shipwreck. They look for pleasure but find pain and sorrows.
Money itself is not neutral; it is basically defiled.
Jesus called money “unrighteous mammon” (, ), and Paul called it “filthy lucre” (, ; , ).
Money can be invested for eternity by bringing Christ to lost people, or it can send a man to hell by becoming his god.
Every one of the Ten Commandments can be broken because of money.
Because of a desire for money, people have denied God, blasphemed His name, stolen, lied, murdered, committed adultery, and so on.
Every one of the Ten Commandments can be broken because of money. Because of a desire for money, people have denied God, blasphemed His name, stolen, lied, murdered, committed adultery, and so on. A lust for material things makes people wander (err) from the faith, and this leads to shipwreck. They look for pleasure but find pain and sorrows.

And as we see in our chapter, a lust for personal profit makes people wander from the faith, and lead others from the faith, looking for pleasure but finding only pain and sorrows.

----
----
With verse 11, Paul now turns from the false teachers to Timothy.
Paul says,
While caring for the needs of his people, Timothy needed to care for himself as well.
“Take heed unto thyself” () was one of Paul’s admonitions.
The phrase “But thou” () indicates a contrast between Timothy and the false teachers.
They were men of the world, but he was a “man of God.”
This special designation was also given to Moses (), Samuel (), Elijah (), and David (); so Timothy was in good company.
Paul gave four admonitions to Timothy that, if obeyed, would assure him success in his ministry and a continued testimony as “a man of God.”

v11-16

Paul uses the phrase, “Man of God” to refer to Timothy and he does that to draw a distinction, starting with, “But you.”

The distinction was from the false teachers, who were men of the world, to Timothy, who was a “man of God.”

This special designation was also given to Moses (), Samuel (), Elijah (), and David (); so Timothy was in good company.
These were men who proclaimed the word God faithfully.
----
Timothy is to be completely different from the False Teachers that Paul has just talked about.
Timothy is to be completely different from the False Teachers that Paul has just talked about.
There are times when running away is a mark of cowardice.
There are times when running away is a mark of cowardice. “Should such a man as I flee?” asked Nehemiah (). But there are other times when fleeing is a mark of wisdom and a means of victory. Joseph fled when he was tempted by his master’s wife (), and David fled when King Saul tried to kill him (). The word “flee” that Paul used here did not refer to literal running, but to Timothy’s separating himself from the sins of the false teachers. This echoes the admonition in : “From such withdraw thyself.”
When threatened, it was suggested that Nehemiah should run, but he would not leave his duties and responded, “Should such a man as I flee?” asked Nehemiah ().
Do not read below:
Nehemiah 6:11 NKJV
And I said, “Should such a man as I flee? And who is there such as I who would go into the temple to save his life? I will not go in!”
BUT there are other times when fleeing is a mark of wisdom and a means of victory.
Joseph fled when he was tempted by Potifer’s wife (), and David fled when King Saul tried to kill him ().

The word “flee” that Paul used here did not refer to literal running, but to Timothy’s separating himself from the sins of the false teachers.

And this echoes the admonition from verse 5: “From such withdraw yourself”
Do not read below:
1 Timothy 6:5 NKJV
useless wranglings of men of corrupt minds and destitute of the truth, who suppose that godliness is a means of gain. From such withdraw yourself.
Wisdom recognizes that not all unity is good, and not all division is bad.
There are times when a servant of God should take a stand against false doctrine and godless practices, and separate himself from them.
He must be sure, however, that he acts on the basis of biblical conviction and not because of a personal prejudice or a spirit of envy.
----

But in the second half of verse 11, Paul says there are things that Timothy should run to … pursue (or some translations use follow).

Pursue is the best translation … So, Paul says pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, gentleness.

These qualities are radically different from the qualities of the false teachers.
i
Righteousness:
Means ‘doing what is right in relation to God and man’— and that is living in obedience to God’s Word.
The false teachers added to and took away from God’s desires to suit their own desires.
Godliness:
Is a reverence for God that gives Christians a desire to please him.
It provides a stark contrast with the false spirituality put forward by the new teachers.
They forbade the consumption of particular foods and added all sorts of rules and regulations to the good news.
But true spirituality comes from a God-centered attitude and a simple commitment to do His will.
Faith:
Is a confident trust in God.
men who proclaimed the word God had given them
The false teachers did not trust in God … but in lies and schemes.
Love
The word Paul uses is agape.
It describes a distinctively Christian quality—which is an ‘unrestricted and unrestrained, encompassing love for God, other believers and people’.
Patience (steadfastness is a better translation):
This is the ability to bear up under difficult and painful circumstances.
For the Christian, it’s an unswerving loyalty to the Lord in the midst of trials.
This was something Timothy would need if he was going to stay in Ephesus and confront these new teachers or new doctrines.
Gentleness:
gentleness, which means kindness or meekness.
This means kindness or meekness.
“Meekness” is not weakness, but instead is “power under control.”
Robinson, S. J. (2004). Opening up 1 Timothy (p. 118). Leominster: Day One Publications.
Timothy would need this attitude when confronting those who were buying into false teachings and contending for the faith against false teachers.
Paul wrote to the Galatians:
Galatians 6:1 NKJV
Brethren, if a man is overtaken in any trespass, you who are spiritual restore such a one in a spirit of gentleness, considering yourself lest you also be tempted.
The word ‘pursue’ means to hunt, or to follow zealously. So this is something on which he must expend all his energy.
The ideas and temptations described in chapter 6:3–10 still exist.
“Righteousness” means “personal integrity.”
“Godliness” means “practical piety.” The first has to do with character; the second, with conduct.
“Faith” might better be translated “faithfulness.” It has well been said that the greatest ability is dependability.
“Love” is the agape love that sacrifices for the sake of others. It seeks to give, not to gain.
We too should flee from them and pursue with determination the qualities Paul lists.
“Patience” carries the idea of “endurance,” sticking to it when the going is tough. It is not a complacency that waits, but a courage that continues in hard places.
“Meekness” is not weakness, but instead is “power under control.” Courageous endurance without meekness could make a person a tyrant. Perhaps “gentleness” expresses the meaning best.
----

Now, look with me to verse 12 … Timothy is also to ‘fight the good fight of the faith.’

Timothy is also to ‘fight the good fight of the faith.’
The Greek word here is ἀγωνίζομαι Agōnizomai (ago-neezo-may) which means struggle.
As you may guess, the word ‘agonize’ comes from this Greek word.
The false teachers who were making life difficult for Timothy took great delight in twisting words.
They created new revelations and questionable teachings which did nothing but inflict damage on the church.
Timothy, however, was to wage war for ‘the faith.’
By ‘the faith’, what is meant is the truth God had revealed and which had been taught by the apostles.
Paul describes this as a “kalos agōn” or ‘good fight’.

Timothy should not stoop to the contentious and divisive level of the false teachers.

Instead, he must confront and correct them in a way that would honour God.
We, too, must ‘fight the good fight of the faith.’
We must uphold the standards God has set in his Word, opposing every idea that contradicts them.
But we are to do so in a way that models God’s love and promotes the good news.
And so, Paul points to the wonderful example of Christ when He made His courageous witness before Pilate.
There are times when running away is a mark of cowardice. “Should such a man as I flee?” asked Nehemiah (). But there are other times when fleeing is a mark of wisdom and a means of victory. Joseph fled when he was tempted by his master’s wife (), and David fled when King Saul tried to kill him (). The word “flee” that Paul used here did not refer to literal running, but to Timothy’s separating himself from the sins of the false teachers. This echoes the admonition in : “From such withdraw thyself.”
Not all unity is good, and not all division is bad. There are times when a servant of God should take a stand against false doctrine and godless practices, and separate himself from them. He must be sure, however, that he acts on the basis of biblical conviction and not because of a personal prejudice or a carnal party spirit.
Paul points to the wonderful example of Christ when He made His courageous witness before Pilate. “We serve the King of kings!” writes Paul. “Be faithful until He comes. When He comes, He will honor you for your good work.”
“We serve the King of kings!” writes Paul.
Follow (v. 11b). Separation without positive growth becomes isolation. We must cultivate these graces of the Spirit in our lives, or else we will be known only for what we oppose rather than for what we propose. “Righteousness” means “personal integrity.”
“Godliness” means “practical piety.” The first has to do with character; the second, with conduct.
“Be faithful until He comes. When He comes, He will honor you for your good work.”
“Faith” might better be translated “faithfulness.” It has well been said that the greatest ability is dependability.

v17-19

“Love” is the agape love that sacrifices for the sake of others. It seeks to give, not to gain.
“Patience” carries the idea of “endurance,” sticking to it when the going is tough. It is not a complacency that waits, but a courage that continues in hard places.
“Meekness” is not weakness, but instead is “power under control.” Courageous endurance without meekness could make a person a tyrant. Perhaps “gentleness” expresses the meaning best.

v17-19

So, Paul wrote about the danger of the love of money.

Here he adds a special “charge” for Timothy to give to the rich.

Paul had already written about the danger of the love of money, but he added a special “charge” for Timothy to give to the rich. We may not think that this charge applies to us, but it does. After all, our standard of living today would certainly make us “rich” in the eyes of Timothy’s congregation!
Now, we are not a church of people who are financially well to do, so we might not think that this part of the Chapter applies to us but it does.
We are not a church of people who are financially well to do, so we might not think that this part of the Chapter applies to us but it does.
Our standard of living today would certainly make us “rich” in the eyes of Timothy’s congregation.
We need to remember that what we do have or don’t have here on earth does not give us special status in God’s kingdom.
Wealth in this world is momentary … it comes and goes and what it buys spoils and rusts.

But in Christ we have true riches.

the riches of his goodness and forbearance and longsuffering
Riches such as, “The riches of his goodness and forbearance and longsuffering” as speaks of.
And, “The riches of his glory on the vessels of mercy, which he had afore prepared unto glory" as says.
And, “The riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God” as reads.
the riches of his glory on the vessels of mercy, which he had afore prepared unto glory"
the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God!"
In Christ, in fact, are, "Hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge" as points out.
Do not read below:
Romans 2:4 NKJV
Or do you despise the riches of His goodness, forbearance, and longsuffering, not knowing that the goodness of God leads you to repentance?
Do not read below:
Romans 9:23 NKJV
and that He might make known the riches of His glory on the vessels of mercy, which He had prepared beforehand for glory,
Do not read below:
Romans 11:33 NKJV
Oh, the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are His judgments and His ways past finding out!
Do not read below:
Romans 9
Colossians 2:3 NKJV
in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.
And the Bible speaks of so many other riches, such as:
Riches of His grace,
Riches of His mercy,
Riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints …
And then there are “unsearchable riches of Christ.”
1 Corinthians 2:9 NKJV
But as it is written: “Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, Nor have entered into the heart of man The things which God has prepared for those who love Him.”
the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints.
These are the riches that we should take the greatest delight in … and they DO follow us after we have died.

But what about the earthly wealth that we might have?

In Christ, we have “all things to enjoy” and they are given to us “richly”!

Matthew 6:19–21 NKJV
“Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal; but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.
But these material blessings are not only for enjoyment, they are also to be used for the glory of God.
Money should be used for good works; it should be shared; it should be invested in things eternal, laying a good foundation for the time to come.
“Treasures in heaven” is the way Jesus put it in .
Matthew 6:19–21 NKJV
“Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal; but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.
It is possible to be “rich in this present age” and be poor in the next.
It is also possible to be poor in this world and rich in the next.
But a believer can be rich in this world and also rich in the next if he uses what he has to honor God.
And a person who is poor in this world can use even his limited means to glorify God, and discover great reward in the next.
----
Paul uses an interesting phrase … “Those who are rich in this present age.”

And so, Paul uses an interesting phrase … “Those who are rich in this present age.”

It is possible to be rich in this world but not rich toward God.

More important than wealth is people.

How can we use wealth for God’s glory?

Don’t be haughty … Be humble (v. 17a).
If wealth makes you proud, then you don’t understand where your wealth came from.
says, “You shall remember the Lord your God, for it is He who gives you power to get wealth.”
Do not read below:
Deuteronomy 8:18 NKJV
“And you shall remember the Lord your God, for it is He who gives you power to get wealth, that He may establish His covenant which He swore to your fathers, as it is this day.
We are not owners; we are stewards.
Of all people, a Christian should recognize that any wealth that is had is by the goodness of God and not because of any special merit of the individual.
We are not owners; we are stewards. If we have wealth, it is by the goodness of God and not because of any special merits on our part. The possessing of material wealth ought to humble a person and cause him to glorify God, not himself.
The possessing of material wealth ought to humble a person and cause him to glorify God, not himself.
It is possible to be “rich in the world [age]” () and be poor in the next. It is also possible to be poor in this world and rich in the next. Jesus talked about both (). But a believer can be rich in this world and also rich in the next if he uses what he has to honor God (). In fact, a person who is poor in this world can use even his limited means to glorify God, and discover great reward in the next world.
Also, trust God, not wealth (v. 17b).

The rich farmer in the Lord’s parable of Luke 12 thought that his wealth meant security.

It was actually an evidence of insecurity.

He was not really trusting God.

Riches are uncertain.

Their value and durability is constantly changing.
Wealth is easily stolen and investments can drop in value.
We may often say, “Love the giver, not the gifts” but in the case of God, it’s also “Trust the Giver, not the gifts.”
Enjoy what God gives you (v. 17c).
Enjoy what God gives you (v. 17c). Yes, the word enjoy is in the Bible! In fact, one of the recurring themes in Ecclesiastes is, “Enjoy the blessings of life now, because life will end one day” (; , ; ; ; ). This is not sinful “hedonism,” living for the pleasures of life. It is simply enjoying all that God gives us for His glory.
Many people would find it hard to believe that the word enjoy is in the Bible … after all, most people believe it’s all “shalt nots” and punishments.
But here it is … enjoy!
In fact, one of the recurring themes in Ecclesiastes is, “Enjoy the blessings of life now, because life will end one day.”
Yes, the word enjoy is in the Bible! In fact, one of the recurring themes in Ecclesiastes is, “Enjoy the blessings of life now, because life will end one day” (; , ; ; ; ). This is not sinful “hedonism,” living for the pleasures of life. It is simply enjoying all that God gives us for His glory.
This is not sinful “hedonism,” living for the pleasures of life.
It is simply enjoying all that God gives us for His glory.
Finally … put to work that which God gives you (vv. 18–19).

We should use our wealth to do good to others.

Be rich in good works.

Where it says … “That they may lay hold of eternal life” in verse 19 does not suggest that these people are not saved.
“That they may take hold of what is truly life” would be the better translation.
Harris, W. H., III, Ritzema, E., Brannan, R., Mangum, D., Dunham, J., Reimer, J. A., & Wierenga, M. (Eds.). (2012). The Lexham English Bible (). Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press.” would express it perfectly.
Riches can lure a person into a make-believe world of shallow pleasure.
But riches used according to God’s will can introduce a person to life that is real and ministry that is lasting.
----
Paul’s final sentence was not for Timothy alone, because the pronoun is plural: “Grace be with all of you.” Paul had the entire church in mind when he wrote this letter, and certainly all of the elders, not just Timothy. As leader of the church, Timothy needed to heed the word of the apostle; but all of his church members had a responsibility to hear and obey as well.
And so do we today.

v20-21

Paul’s final sentence was not just for Timothy.

Notice that the pronoun here is plural: “Grace be with all of you.”

Paul was writing to the whole church when he wrote this letter.
As leader of the church, Timothy was responsible to heed the words of this letter.
But all of his church members had a responsibility to hear and obey as well.
And so do we today.
----

This handing down of and obedience to the truth by faithful men and women in the church is God’s way of protecting the truth and spreading it around the world.

God had committed the truth to Paul (), and Paul had committed it to Timothy.
It was Timothy’s responsibility to guard the deposit and then pass it along to others who would, in turn, continue to pass it on ().
This is God’s way of protecting the truth and spreading it around the world.

We are stewards of the doctrines of the faith, and God expects us to be faithful in sharing His Good News.

It is God’s Word and it does not change to suit our opinions or our preferences.
The blank pages after the maps are not there for us to add new doctrines to scripture.
God is not doing a “New Thing” nor will He be doing a “New Thing” because He is performing His Word, which we have perfectly.
When the prophet Isaiah speaks of God doing a new thing, it is speaking of His work of redemption.
But false teachers have taken this scripture out of context to claim all kinds of things and put their own words in Gods mouth for their own personal gain.
And people are falling for it and being deceived.
Those who make proclamations of a New Word God is doing of opening windows in heaven or
Those who make proclamations of a New Word God is doing of opening windows in heaven or
The antidote to this is to, “Guard what [has been] committed to [our] trust” and to “avoid profane and idle babblings and false knowledge.”
The word science () does not refer to the kind of technology we know today by that name. “Knowledge falsely so called” is a better translation. Paul referred here to the teachings of a heretical group called “gnostics” who claimed to have a “special spiritual knowledge.” (The Greek word for “knowledge” is gnosis, pronounced NO-sis. An “agnostic” is one who does not know. A gnostic is one who claimed to know a great deal.)
There is no need to go into detail here about the heretical claims of the gnostics. Paul’s letter to the Colossians was written to counteract them. They claimed to have “special spiritual knowledge” from visions and other experiences. They also claimed to find “hidden truths” in the Old Testament Scriptures, especially the genealogies. They considered matter to be evil, and they taught that a series of “emanations” connected God with man. Jesus Christ, they said, was only the greatest of these emanations.
The gnostics actually had a doctrine that was a strange mixture of Christianity, Oriental mysticism, Greek philosophy, and Jewish legalism. Like many of the Eastern cults we see today, it offered “something for everybody.” But Paul summarized all that they taught in one devastating phrase: “profane and vain babblings.” Phillips translates it “the godless mixture of contradictory notions.”
Why should we avoid these teachings?
Because some who got involved in them “strayed from the faith” (, niv).
And people are straying from the faith today because of false teachings.
Not only will wrong motives (such as a desire for money) cause a person to wander from the faith (), but so will wrong teachings.
These lies work their way into a person’s mind and heart gradually, and before he realizes it, he is wandering off the path of truth.
Proper doctrine is very important to the right expression of faith.
We have been entrusted with the teaching that God has revealed to Paul and the other apostles.
We must make sure that it is kept free from any additions or subtractions that people might like to make.
How do we guard this great faith that has been given to us?
We do it by preaching it faithfully, studying it, living for it and testing everything by it.
Prayer: Heavenly Father, thank You for Your sure Word. Your word is a lamp to our feet and a light to our path. Thank you that we can live in Your light and walk in Your truth. Give us a fresh and solid love for Your Word. I pray that we would be able to say, like Paul, "I have not shunned to declare to you the full counsel of God.” Thank You that You are faithful and Your mercy endures forever. In Jesus’ name. Amen.
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