Faithlife Sermons

Glorifying Your Good God

Savoring the Psalter  •  Sermon  •  Submitted   •  59:58
0 ratings
· 147 views

What is it that you have learned about your glorious, saving, reviving, refining, prayer-answering God? Then tell that to others who need to hear what He has done!

Files
Notes
Transcript
Sermon Tone Analysis
A
D
F
J
S
Emotion
A
C
T
Language
O
C
E
A
E
Social
View more →
Psalm 66 KJV 1900
To the chief Musician, A Song or Psalm. 1 Make a joyful noise unto God, all ye lands: 2 Sing forth the honour of his name: Make his praise glorious. 3 Say unto God, How terrible art thou in thy works! Through the greatness of thy power shall thine enemies submit themselves unto thee. 4 All the earth shall worship thee, And shall sing unto thee; they shall sing to thy name. Selah. 5 Come and see the works of God: He is terrible in his doing toward the children of men. 6 He turned the sea into dry land: They went through the flood on foot: There did we rejoice in him. 7 He ruleth by his power for ever; His eyes behold the nations: Let not the rebellious exalt themselves. Selah. 8 O bless our God, ye people, And make the voice of his praise to be heard: 9 Which holdeth our soul in life, And suffereth not our feet to be moved. 10 For thou, O God, hast proved us: Thou hast tried us, as silver is tried. 11 Thou broughtest us into the net; Thou laidst affliction upon our loins. 12 Thou hast caused men to ride over our heads; We went through fire and through water: But thou broughtest us out into a wealthy place. 13 I will go into thy house with burnt offerings: I will pay thee my vows, 14 Which my lips have uttered, And my mouth hath spoken, when I was in trouble. 15 I will offer unto thee burnt sacrifices of fatlings, With the incense of rams; I will offer bullocks with goats. Selah. 16 Come and hear, all ye that fear God, And I will declare what he hath done for my soul. 17 I cried unto him with my mouth, And he was extolled with my tongue. 18 If I regard iniquity in my heart, The Lord will not hear me: 19 But verily God hath heard me; He hath attended to the voice of my prayer. 20 Blessed be God, which hath not turned away my prayer, Nor his mercy from me.

Introduction:

THE DOMINANT THOUGHT.
THE DOMINANT THOUGHT.
In the second book the dominant thought is that of the might of God realized by His people, and manifest through them.
In the second book [of the Psalter] the dominant thought is that of the might of God realized by His people, and manifest through them. - The worship is that of Jehovah as the wonder-working God.
The worship is that of Jehovah as the wonder-working God.
TITLES
42. God remembered in exile.
43. God leading the exiled home.
44. God the Author of good and evil.
45. God gladdening the king and his bride.
46. God the Refuge of His people.
47. God reigning over the nations.
48. God reigning over His own.
49. God the Source of immortality.
50. God manifesting Himself through His people.
51. God the Saviour of the sinful.
52. God the Destroyer of the sinful.
53. God disappointed in man.
54. God the Helper of the oppressed.
55. God the Deliverer of the betrayed.
56. God the tender Friend of the oppressed.
57. God the Refuge in calamity.
58. God the God of vengeance.
59. God the High Tower of the oppressed.
60. God the Hope of His people.
61. God the Hope of man.
62. God the only Hope of man.
63. God the perfect Hope of man.
64. God the Defence of the persecuted.
65. God the God of harvest.
66. God the Object of worship.
67. God the perfect Governor of the nations.
68. God the Strength of His people.
69. God the Succourer of the sorrowful.
70. God the Hope of the despairing.
71. God the Confidence of old age.
72. God the King of the king.
[G. Campbell Morgan, The Analyzed Bible: Job to Malachi, vol. 2 (New York; Chicago; Toronto; London; Edinburgh: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1908), 30.]
[G. Campbell Morgan, The Analyzed Bible: Job to Malachi, vol. 2 (New York; Chicago; Toronto; London; Edinburgh: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1908), 30.]
Main Thought: What is it that you have learned about your glorious, saving, reviving, refining, prayer-answering God? Then tell that to others who need to hear what He has done!
Sub-intro:
is a fitting sequel to , as they share significant themes. In both psalms, God is praised (65:1; 66:2, 8) in the Temple (65:4; 66:13) for his “awesome” deeds (65:5; 66:3, 5) and as the one who listens to prayer (65:2; 66:18–20). Both have the fulfilling of vows in view (65:1; 66:13). And both psalms share a universal scope with all the earth being called upon to worship God (65:5; 66:1, 4) in awe (65:8; 66:16). But whereas focuses on God’s deeds in creation, focuses on God’s deeds in redemption. [Mark D. Futato, “The Book of Psalms,” in Cornerstone Biblical Commentary, Vol 7: The Book of Psalms, The Book of Proverbs (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2009), 221.]
Some of the old expositors speak of this psalm as “the Lord’s Prayer in the Old Testament.” [F. B. Meyer, Through the Bible Day by Day: A Devotional Commentary, vol. 3 (Philadelphia: American Sunday-School Union, 1914–1918), 88.]
Mark D. Futato, “The Book of Psalms,” in Cornerstone Biblical Commentary, Vol 7: The Book of Psalms, The Book of Proverbs (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2009), 221.]
F. B. Meyer, Through the Bible Day by Day: A Devotional Commentary, vol. 3 (Philadelphia: American Sunday-School Union, 1914–1918), 88.]
Body:

I. Praising God Corporately ().

A. Rejoicing - Singing Melodies to God in Praises ().

1. The Picture of Proper Praise - Praise Is Joyful, Honoring, and Glorious (vv. 1-2).
Psalm 66:1–2 KJV 1900
1 Make a joyful noise unto God, all ye lands: 2 Sing forth the honour of his name: Make his praise glorious.
Worship is Kept Simple
That at what time ye hear the sound of the cornet, flute, harp, sackbut, psaltery, dulcimer, and all kinds of musick, ye fall down and worship the golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the king hath set up:
God does love to hear praise that is glorious (). Nothing we do is to be done halfheartedly. But in contrast to a heartfelt and inspired worship is the created show. Too often world styled worship is a production and show to end all shows. In this verse we find they decided to create a show that used every kind of instrument available. In reality this was nothing more than a noisy and raucous session.
Today [if we were in attendance at many of our contemporary churches] we could say, “When the head splitting racket starts, then find a seat in our auditorium! Our service is beginning!” In contrast we find that God only wants the quiet and sincere attitude of worship. Order and euphony is also important!
This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them;
Let all things be done decently and in order.
The contrast is seen when the king called to the “servants of the Most High God” and asked them to come out of the furnace. God was honored in a very quiet but powerful way.
Then Nebuchadnezzar came near to the mouth of the burning fiery furnace, and spake, and said, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, ye servants of the most high God, come forth, and come hither. Then Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, came forth of the midst of the fire. [Clinton A. Macomber, What Really Matters (Redding, CA: Pleasant Places Press, 2005), 60–61.]
Clinton A. Macomber, What Really Matters (Redding, CA: Pleasant Places Press, 2005), 60–61.
Clinton A. Macomber, What Really Matters (Redding, CA: Pleasant Places Press, 2005), 60–61.
2. The Perspective of Proper Praise - Praise Is Humbling in Light of God's Person & Power (v. 3).
Psalm 66:3 KJV 1900
3 Say unto God, How terrible art thou in thy works! Through the greatness of thy power shall thine enemies submit themselves unto thee.
The kingdom of God is not dispensational. It runs through all dispensations, and has been here ever since there was a new-born soul to enter it; and will continue through the kingdom of the Son of Man. In this, the millennium, there will be some who will yield feigned obedience to Christ (, margin). Such will be in the kingdom of the Son of Man, but not in the kingdom of God. Paul preached the kingdom of God (); and tells us it is “not meat and drink, but righteousness and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost” (); and that it “ is not in word but in power” (). [P. Van Winkle, The Christophanies (Galaxie Software, 2005), 31–32.]
P. Van Winkle, The Christophanies (Galaxie Software, 2005), 31–32.]
3. The People Involved in Proper Praise - Praise Shall Be Heralded by All the Peoples of the Earth (v. 4).
Psalm 66:4 KJV 1900
4 All the earth shall worship thee, And shall sing unto thee; they shall sing to thy name. Selah.
The devout soul cannot be glad alone. It demands sympathy in its raptures. All the earth is not too great for an orchestra, nor all mankind for a choir [Meyer, 88.]
F. B. Meyer, Through the Bible Day by Day: A Devotional Commentary, vol. 3 (Philadelphia: American Sunday-School Union, 1914–1918), 88.]

B. Remembering - Bringing Memories of God's Deliverance ().

1. The Object of God's Deliverance - the Children of Men (v. 5).
Psalm 66:5 KJV 1900
5 Come and see the works of God: He is terrible in his doing toward the children of men.
John 1:39–40 KJV 1900
39 He saith unto them, Come and see. They came and saw where he dwelt, and abode with him that day: for it was about the tenth hour. 40 One of the two which heard John speak, and followed him, was Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother.
Jn.
2. The Outcomes of God's Deliverance - Rejoicing in His Salvation (v. 6).
Psalm 66:6 KJV 1900
6 He turned the sea into dry land: They went through the flood on foot: There did we rejoice in him.
What is amazing in this psalm is that this greatest of redemptive deeds in the Old Testament was done not simply for the benefit of Israel but for all humanity (see note on “people” on 66:5). Just as God chose Abraham and blessed him so that all the families of the earth might be blessed through him (; see also ), so the Exodus was one more step in the outworking of God’s redemptive plan for the world. [Futato, 221.]
[Mark D. Futato, “The Book of Psalms,” in Cornerstone Biblical Commentary, Vol 7: The Book of Psalms, The Book of Proverbs (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2009), 221.]
Mark D. Futato, “The Book of Psalms,” in Cornerstone Biblical Commentary, Vol 7: The Book of Psalms, The Book of Proverbs (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2009), 221.]
3. The Onerous in His Deliverance - The Abasement of the Proud (v. 7).
Psalm 66:7 KJV 1900
7 He ruleth by his power for ever; His eyes behold the nations: Let not the rebellious exalt themselves. Selah.
The psalmist invited all the Gentile nations to praise God for what He had done for Israel! Why? Because through Israel, the Lord brought truth and salvation to the Gentiles. “Salvation is of the Jews” (). This is a missionary psalm showing the importance of taking the good news of Jesus Christ into all the world. God’s purpose is that all the nations shall praise Him (98:4; 100:1; ), but they can’t do that until they trust Him (). It’s tragic that the nations today attack and persecute Israel instead of thanking God for her spiritual contribution to them. But the nations don’t know the Lord, and Israel has been blinded and hardened by her unbelief (). When Israel sees her Messiah and trusts Him, then the world situation will change (), and all the nations will worship the Lord. One day there shall be universal praise lifted for Jesus Christ (; ). [Warren W. Wiersbe, Be Worshipful, 1st ed., “Be” Commentary Series (Colorado Springs, CO: Cook Communications Ministries, 2004), 220.]
Warren W. Wiersbe, Be Worshipful, 1st ed., “Be” Commentary Series (Colorado Springs, CO: Cook Communications Ministries, 2004), 220.]

C. Reviving - Blessing the Maintaining Hand of God ().

1. A Resounding Praise (v. 8).
Psalm 66:8 KJV 1900
8 O bless our God, ye people, And make the voice of his praise to be heard:
This verse looks forward to that day in the future when Israel will be restored to the land. Ezekiel tells us that in that day they will offer sacrifices. What is the explanation of it? Just as they offered sacrifices in the Old Testament that pictured the coming of Christ, in the future they will offer sacrifices that will look back to Christ’s coming. Every lamb will point to “… the Lamb of God which taketh away the sin of the world” (). [J. Vernon McGee, Thru the Bible Commentary, electronic ed., vol. 2 (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1997), 782.]
[J. Vernon McGee, Thru the Bible Commentary, electronic ed., vol. 2 (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1997), 782.]
2. A Reviving Providence (v. 9).
Psalm 66:9 KJV 1900
9 Which holdeth our soul in life, And suffereth not our feet to be moved.
Israel is an object lesson to all peoples. It was Frederick the Great who demanded that Count Zinzendorf defend the accuracy of the Bible in a word! The count was not at a loss for a word. “The Jew, sire!” was his reply. A nation scattered and peeled, hated and hunted, impossible either to assimilate or exterminate. Down through the centuries the word has held true: “He holdeth our soul in life, and suffereth not our foot to be moved.” For thousands of years the history of the Jewish people has demonstrated that. Nationally this people has remained a gulf stream in the ocean of mankind. They have stood in some slippery places, but their national identity has been preserved and now they are back in the land, a nation among the nations awaiting their date with disaster in the great tribulation and then with destiny at the return of Christ. While the psalmist’s exultant shout has a personal application, the context is clearly national. He wants all nations to see God protecting Israel. [John Phillips, Exploring : An Expository Commentary, vol. 1, The John Phillips Commentary Series (Kregel Publications; WORDsearch Corp., 2009), .]
3. A Refining Process (v. 10).
Psalm 66:10 KJV 1900
10 For thou, O God, hast proved us: Thou hast tried us, as silver is tried.
Israel is an object lesson to all peoples. It was Frederick the Great who demanded that Count Zinzendorf defend the accuracy of the Bible in a word! The count was not at a loss for a word. “The Jew, sire!” was his reply. A nation scattered and peeled, hated and hunted, impossible either to assimilate or exterminate. Down through the centuries the word has held true: “He holdeth our soul in life, and suffereth not our foot to be moved.” For thousands of years the history of the Jewish people has demonstrated that. Nationally this people has remained a gulf stream in the ocean of mankind. They have stood in some slippery places, but their national identity has been preserved and now they are back in the land, a nation among the nations awaiting their date with disaster in the great tribulation and then with destiny at the return of Christ. While the psalmist’s exultant shout has a personal application, the context is clearly national. He wants all nations to see God protecting Israel. [John Phillips, Exploring : An Expository Commentary, vol. 1, The John Phillips Commentary Series (Kregel Publications; WORDsearch Corp., 2009), .]
The count was not at a loss for a word. “The Jew, sire!” was his reply. A nation scattered and peeled, hated and hunted, impossible either to assimilate or exterminate. Down through the centuries the word has held true: “He holdeth our soul in life, and suffereth not our foot to be moved.” For thousands of years the history of the Jewish people has demonstrated that. Nationally this people has remained a gulf stream in the ocean of mankind. They have stood in some slippery places, but their national identity has been preserved and now they are back in the land, a nation among the nations awaiting their date with disaster in the great tribulation and then with destiny at the return of Christ. While the psalmist’s exultant shout has a personal application, the context is clearly national. He wants all nations to see God protecting Israel. [John Phillips, Exploring : An Expository Commentary, vol. 1, The John Phillips Commentary Series (Kregel Publications; WORDsearch Corp., 2009), .]
A nation scattered and peeled, hated and hunted, impossible either to assimilate or exterminate. Down through the centuries the word has held true: “He holdeth our soul in life, and suffereth not our foot to be moved.” For thousands of years the history of the Jewish people has demonstrated that. Nationally this people has remained a gulf stream in the ocean of mankind. They have stood in some slippery places, but their national identity has been preserved and now they are back in the land, a nation among the nations awaiting their date with disaster in the great tribulation and then with destiny at the return of Christ. While the psalmist’s exultant shout has a personal application, the context is clearly national. He wants all nations to see God protecting Israel. [John Phillips, Exploring : An Expository Commentary, vol. 1, The John Phillips Commentary Series (Kregel Publications; WORDsearch Corp., 2009), .]
While the psalmist’s exultant shout has a personal application, the context is clearly national. He wants all nations to see God protecting Israel. [John Phillips, Exploring : An Expository Commentary, vol. 1, The John Phillips Commentary Series (Kregel Publications; WORDsearch Corp., 2009), .]
John Phillips, Exploring : An Expository Commentary, vol. 1, The John Phillips Commentary Series (Kregel Publications; WORDsearch Corp., 2009), .]

D. Refining - From the Master's Fiery Trials ().

The Net, the Fire, & the Water Led to Affliction and Domination, but Ended in the Land of Milk & Honey (vv. 11-12).
Psalm 66:11–12 KJV 1900
11 Thou broughtest us into the net; Thou laidst affliction upon our loins. 12 Thou hast caused men to ride over our heads; We went through fire and through water: But thou broughtest us out into a wealthy place.
The word translated “wealthy” is a rare one in the Old Testament. It occurs only here and in where David sings: “My cup runneth over!” It is the same word. A wealthy place! A place where the cup runs over! That will be Israel’s portion in a coming day. This nation which has always had such a talent for accumulating wealth will not only prosper but will run over in blessing to all mankind. [Phillips, .]
John Phillips, Exploring : An Expository Commentary, vol. 1, The John Phillips Commentary Series (Kregel Publications; WORDsearch Corp., 2009), .

II. Thanking God Personally ().

A. Reverencing - Fulfilling the Ministry of God's House ().

1. Performing the Promises Made in Perils (v. 13-14).
Psalm 66:13–14 KJV 1900
13 I will go into thy house with burnt offerings: I will pay thee my vows, 14 Which my lips have uttered, And my mouth hath spoken, when I was in trouble.
“I will pay my vows,” said the psalmist. Jonah quoted this verse in the dreadful prison in which he found himself in the dark depths of the sea: “I will pay my vows.” Jonah proved himself trustworthy with the result a million souls were brought to God. [Phillips, .]
[Phillips, .]
2. Sacrificial Offerings According to Scripture (v. 15).
Psalm 66:15 KJV 1900
15 I will offer unto thee burnt sacrifices of fatlings, With the incense of rams; I will offer bullocks with goats. Selah.

B. Recommending - Calling the Spiritually Minded to Hear God's Testimonies ().

1. An Invitation to Hear the Soul's Declaration (v. 16).
Psalm 66:16 KJV 1900
16 Come and hear, all ye that fear God, And I will declare what he hath done for my soul.
Come and hear, vs. 16–20: The psalm began with Come and see, v. 5. [Meyer, 89.]
Mark 5:19–20 KJV 1900
19 Howbeit Jesus suffered him not, but saith unto him, Go home to thy friends, and tell them how great things the Lord hath done for thee, and hath had compassion on thee. 20 And he departed, and began to publish in Decapolis how great things Jesus had done for him: and all men did marvel.
[F. B. Meyer, Through the Bible Day by Day: A Devotional Commentary, vol. 3 (Philadelphia: American Sunday-School Union, 1914–1918), 89.]
John 4:29 KJV 1900
29 Come, see a man, which told me all things that ever I did: is not this the Christ?
F. B. Meyer, Through the Bible Day by Day: A Devotional Commentary, vol. 3 (Philadelphia: American Sunday-School Union, 1914–1918), 89.]
2. An Articulation of Exaltation (v. 17).
Psalm 66:17 KJV 1900
17 I cried unto him with my mouth, And he was extolled with my tongue.
3. An Evaluation of Honest Internalization (v. 18).
Psalm 66:18 KJV 1900
18 If I regard iniquity in my heart, The Lord will not hear me:
FIRST PROPOSITION: The one who regards iniquity in his heart cannot pray so that God will hear.
FIRST PROPOSITION: The one who regards iniquity in his heart cannot pray so that God will hear.
The word translated “regard” means primarily to “see” or to “look.” Then it comes to mean to “look at with favor,” to “respect,” “approve,” “regard.” God will not hear the man who in his heart looks upon sin with any favor or allowance, God looks at sin with abhorrence. He is of “purer eyes than to behold evil.” (—“Thou art of purer eyes than to behold evil, and canst not look on iniquity,” etc.) The Hebrew verb here is the same as that translated “regard” above. We must have the same attitude toward sin that He has to be heard of Him. If we regard sin, He will not regard us when we pray. Herein lies the very simple explanation why many of us pray and are not heard. [R. A. Torrey, What the Bible Teaches a Thorough and Comprehensive Study of What the Bible Has to Say Concerning the Great Doctrines of Which It Treats (New York, Chicago: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1898), 408.]
The word translated “regard” means primarily to “see” or to “look.” Then it comes to mean to “look at with favor,” to “respect,” “approve,” “regard.” God will not hear the man who in his heart looks upon sin with any favor or allowance, God looks at sin with abhorrence. He is of “purer eyes than to behold evil.” (—“Thou art of purer eyes than to behold evil, and canst not look on iniquity,” etc.) The Hebrew verb here is the same as that translated “regard” above. We must have the same attitude toward sin that He has to be heard of Him. If we regard sin, He will not regard us when we pray. Herein lies the very simple explanation why many of us pray and are not heard. [R. A. Torrey, What the Bible Teaches a Thorough and Comprehensive Study of What the Bible Has to Say Concerning the Great Doctrines of Which It Treats (New York, Chicago: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1898), 408.]
The word translated “regard” means primarily to “see” or to “look.” Then it comes to mean to “look at with favor,” to “respect,” “approve,” “regard.” God will not hear the man who in his heart looks upon sin with any favor or allowance, God looks at sin with abhorrence. He is of “purer eyes than to behold evil.” (—“Thou art of purer eyes than to behold evil, and canst not look on iniquity,” etc.) The Hebrew verb here is the same as that translated “regard” above. We must have the same attitude toward sin that He has to be heard of Him. If we regard sin, He will not regard us when we pray. Herein lies the very simple explanation why many of us pray and are not heard. [R. A. Torrey, What the Bible Teaches a Thorough and Comprehensive Study of What the Bible Has to Say Concerning the Great Doctrines of Which It Treats (New York, Chicago: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1898), 408.]
R. A. Torrey, What the Bible Teaches a Thorough and Comprehensive Study of What the Bible Has to Say Concerning the Great Doctrines of Which It Treats (New York, Chicago: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1898), 408.]
I SOMETIMES tremble when I hear people quote promises, and say that God is bound to fulfill those promises to them, when all the time there is some sin in their lives they are not willing to give up. It is well for us to search our hearts, and find out why it is that our prayers are not answered. [D. L. Moody, The D. L. Moody Year Book: A Living Daily Message from the Words of D. L. Moody, ed. Emma Moody Fitt (East Northfield, MA: The Bookstore, 1900), 13.]
“Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.”
But there is a [great] truth to be learned from this beatitude. Even though we have been redeemed by the blood of Christ and have been made a member of God’s family, God cannot and will not have fellowship with us on the level of our sinfulness. Holiness is a prerequisite for fellowship. “If I regard iniquity in my heart,” says, “the Lord will not hear me.” I cannot enjoy the light of His countenance and the joy of His companionship apart from clean hands and a pure heart. In we are told, “The blood of Jesus Christ his Son, cleanseth [keeps on cleansing] us from all sin.” And in we are assured, “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” Holiness and righteousness are prerequisites to entrance into God’s presence. That same righteousness is a prerequisite to fellowship with Him day by day. “Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.” [J. Dwight Pentecost, Design for Living: Lessons in Holiness from the Sermon on the Mount (Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 1999), 60–61.]
D. L. Moody, The D. L. Moody Year Book: A Living Daily Message from the Words of D. L. Moody, ed. Emma Moody Fitt (East Northfield, MA: The Bookstore, 1900), 13.]
J. Dwight Pentecost, Design for Living: Lessons in Holiness from the Sermon on the Mount (Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 1999), 60–61.

C. Reassuring - Affirming God's Merciful Answering of Prayer ().

1. God's Compassionate Attention to Your Concerns (v. 19).
Psalm 66:19 KJV 1900
19 But verily God hath heard me; He hath attended to the voice of my prayer.
Having called out to God and having confessed sin, the psalmist received an answer. God listened and paid attention to his prayer. In what precise way we are not told, but we are encouraged nonetheless to follow the pattern set forth and to trust that God will listen to our prayers and deliver us from our trials, just as he did the psalmist. [Futato, 222.]
Mark D. Futato, “The Book of Psalms,” in Cornerstone Biblical Commentary, Vol 7: The Book of Psalms, The Book of Proverbs (Carol Stream, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2009), 222.]
2. The Blessedness of God's Consideration and Mercy Toward Your Needs (v. 20).
Psalm 66:20 KJV 1900
20 Blessed be God, which hath not turned away my prayer, Nor his mercy from me.

Conclusion:

66 PSALM 66. SONG II. C. M.

1 O ALL ye lands, rejoice in God,

Sing praises to His name;

Let the whole earth, with one accord,

His wondrous acts proclaim

2 And let His faithful servants tell,

How by redeeming love,

Their souls are saved from death and hell,

To share the joys above.

3 Tell how the Holy Spirit’s grace

Forbids their feet to slide;

And, as they run the Christian race,

Vouchsafes to be their guide.

4 Sing, sing, ye saints, and shout for joy,

Ye ransom’d of the Lord;

Be grateful praise your sweet employ,

His presence your reward.

Harriett Auber, 1829.

Related Media
Related Sermons