Faithlife Sermons

Sermon Tone Analysis

Overall tone of the sermon

This automated analysis scores the text on the likely presence of emotional, language, and social tones. There are no right or wrong scores; this is just an indication of tones readers or listeners may pick up from the text.
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Emotion Tone
Anger
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Fear
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Extraversion
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Tone of specific sentences

Tones
Emotion
Anger
Disgust
Fear
Joy
Sadness
Language
Analytical
Confident
Tentative
Social Tendencies
Openness
Conscientiousness
Extraversion
Agreeableness
Emotional Range
Anger
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Some of the most horrific sins that are commited are the one’s done by our own family members.
When spousal abuse, child abuse, or parent abuse occurs it can create more than just very serious physical harm.
Often after the wounds heal, there is deep emotional baggage.
A person is often emotionally hurt with deep fear that goes on well after our physical wounds have healed.
David experienced some of that deep hurt when his own Son sought to take his throne away and kill him.
Tonight, we will be looking at .
The superscription of this Psalm gives us at least a clue about it’s content.
There is a little bit of disagreement with many of these superscriptions and what they mean.
There is a Hebrew preposition that could mean this is about David or it could be specifying who wrote the Psalm.
The debate essentially circles that question.
In either case, I have no reason to doubt that it is about David’s flee from Absalom.
Background:
If you recall the progression of this story it went like this:
- Tamar is raped by Amnon
- Amnon is murdered by Absalom
- Absalom is exiled by David
- David is exiled by Absalom
Why was Absalom pursuing David?
(Bruce Waltke notes on the Psalms, Biblicaltraining.org)
(Bruce Waltke notes on the Psalms, Biblicaltraining.org)
Actual coup occured in .
Note the contrast between David and Absalom:
Absalom sought his own revenge while David sought God's refuge (according to the Psalm).
David is caught by surprise by the betrayal of many of his counselors, soldiers, and the tribes of Israel.
He is running for His life being pursued by His own son of which there is no doubt, he desires to kill his father.
is both song and a prayer that describes David’s response to this rebellion.
Like much of David’s spiritual life, not a perfect life, but still a life worthy of considering.
This Psalm is a model for what we should do when we are facing a tough situation.
Structure: Basic Stanza (Strophe)
Outline:
1.
The threat of Rebellion ()
a.
The multitude of the rebellion.
(3:1)
b.
The over confidence of the Enemy (3:2)
2. The Refuge of God ()
a. Yahweh's Blessing is upon him.
(3:3)
b.
Yahweh answers his prayer (3:4)
c.
Yahweh sustains him (3:5)
d.
Yahweh gives him peace.
(3:6)
3. The Surety of Victory ()
a. Victory is guaranteed by Yahweh (3:7)
b.
Physical salvation is in Yahweh's control (3:8)
Content:
1.
The threat of Rebellion ()
We see the threat of rebellion in his description of the:
1.
The threat of Rebellion ()
a.
The multitude of the rebellion.
(3:1)
Who was chasing
This is meant to describe how great of an enemy is against him.
A few have remained loyal to David, but many thousand more are chasing him.
He asks the question, how many have are enemies and how many have arose against David.
b.
The over confidence of the Enemy (3:2)
The enemies claim, there is no one to save you from death.
Soul in this passage refers to life.
Salvation is referring to the saving of one’s physical life.
The claim, there is not escape from death by your enemies.
What do you if you are a king facing an overwhelming enemy?
a.
The multitude of the rebellion.
(3:1)
b.
The over confidence of the Enemy (3:2)
2. The Refuge of God (Psalm 3:3-6)
a. Yahweh's Blessing is upon him.
(3:3)
b.
Yahweh answers his prayer (3:4)
c.
Yahweh sustains him (3:5)
d.
Yahweh gives him peace.
(3:6)
3. The Surety of Victory (Psalm 3:7-8)
a. Victory is guaranteed by Yahweh (3:7)
b.
Physical salvation is in Yahweh's control (3:8)
So what do you do if your are a king facing an overwhelming enemy?
The same thing we ought to do for our fears and trials in life.
Take refuge in God.
2. The Refuge of God ()
We see that the great and mighty king David is different from most kings of his day.
While most kings would plot revenge, David sought refuge in God.
We see this first in Yahweh’s blessing upon David.
a. Yahweh's Blessing is upon him.
(3:3)
Shield -
This is the idea of protection.
A soldier in David’s day would carry a shield to battle.
Why?
It protects him from spears, swords, and arrows.
In the same way, David is saying God is going to protect him from the literal spears, swords, and arrows of his enemy.
He describes the shield of God being about him on all sides.
His enemies may be myriad all around him, but equally God is surrounding him.
Glory -
The word here glory is the idea of the honor of the King.
The word here glory is the idea of the honor of the King.
How has David lost his glory in the human sense?
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