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Arrogant Service or Joyful Worship

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Songs of Worship

Call To Worship:
Immortal, Invisible (God Only Wise) - Scott Wesley Brown
2.Be Thou My Passion - Christ 4 The Nations 3.All Hail The Power Of Jesus Name - Newsboys To God Be The Glory - Francis J. Crosby Communion .The Cross Medley - Discovery Singers Benediction . Be Thou My Vision - 4 Him
Be Thou My Passion - Christ 4 The Nations
All Hail The Power Of Jesus Name - Newsboys
To God Be The Glory - Francis J. Crosby
The Cross Medley - Discovery Singers
Be Thou My Vision - 4 Him

Call To Worship Scripture

Matthew 16:16–18 ESV
Simon Peter replied, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.

Sermon Scripture

2 Samuel 7:26–29 ESV
And your name will be magnified forever, saying, ‘The Lord of hosts is God over Israel,’ and the house of your servant David will be established before you. For you, O Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, have made this revelation to your servant, saying, ‘I will build you a house.’ Therefore your servant has found courage to pray this prayer to you. And now, O Lord God, you are God, and your words are true, and you have promised this good thing to your servant. Now therefore may it please you to bless the house of your servant, so that it may continue forever before you. For you, O Lord God, have spoken, and with your blessing shall the house of your servant be blessed forever.”
2 Samuel 7:26

Introduction: Arrogance In The Church - A lesson from 2 Samuel 7

When our arrogance is finally destroyed, it can result in some of our greatest pleasure, joy and worship that we have ever known.
Arrogance - a word which we all can have labled upon us. It is the thinking of ones self more highly than one ought. Or in this case, the failure to consider with accuracy the relationship between you and God Almighty and apply that to your ambitions.
Arrogance is the great enemy of love though it may begin with noble intentions. The seeking to serve and the seeking to do something for someone are two entirely different things. The servant recognizes a master and places themselves below the master. They are therefore honored to be approached by the master to do anything for the master. The one seeking to do something for another in need may place themselves above that person as able to accomplish something that the one whom they are serving cannot. In this form of service there is a sort of “been there done that” or “here let me help you (who cannot do it) pride.
As Christians we are called to serve God alone, which means that every act of service is one of humble position as being unto God. It is of the first description, of seeking to serve God. And it is in that, that we take pride. That we have been used by God, and if we were not to be chosen by God, to be used by God, then we would have no position to rightly serve in the first place.
In a time, culture and society within and without the church when charity has become the pop culture icon, we must learn this lesson less we in claiming to “serve God” choke on our own arrogance and offend God.
However I would offer you two more reasons why you should hear the message this morning. Not only should you hear in order to avoid an offence towards God, but also, when serving from the flesh we miss out on the greatness of the actual plans of God and on His great plans for us and how we truly bless others through His power and enabling.
In short, you could describe this morning exhortation to you, to recognize that, to be called out by God, to walk by faith in His promises, is more worthy of praise than any ambitious thought of man.
Our ambitions, even when they are for God, bring God nothing. However obedience and recognition of who He is and trust in His good and perfect will, brings God great delight in His servant.
This is the lesson learned by King David in . This chapter of scripture makes up a crucial text which contains the Davidic covenant. It is one that points us away from our own “godly ambitions” and demands that we look at and take joy in the plans of God.

David’s Plans Receive The Prophets Approval

First we see David’s plans and that they are met with prophetic approval:
2 Samuel 7:1–3 ESV
Now when the king lived in his house and the Lord had given him rest from all his surrounding enemies, the king said to Nathan the prophet, “See now, I dwell in a house of cedar, but the ark of God dwells in a tent.” And Nathan said to the king, “Go, do all that is in your heart, for the Lord is with you.”
David had, had great success by the power of God. Perhaps in a moment of contemplation David recognizes how far God had brought him from herding sheep to being King over Israel ().
David and Israel were in a time of peace. David with help from Hiram, king of Tyre, had completed his own palace and is now living in royal splendor. This being accomplished David has time to observe and to devote himself to other task.
Now it is, that after a failed first effort the ark of God has been successfully brought to Jerusalem and housed in a tent. Now, how is it appropriate for David to live in a palace and the ark of God to be kept in a tent? This is the thought that comes to David when he gets the ambition to build another house to house the ark of God in, one that is far more fitting with the surroundings.
With this set in his mind, he tells the prophet Nathan. Nathan sees no great error in this with the law of God. In fact it appears that he sees it as rather noble. However the God who knows both the mind and heart better than we ourselves corrects His prophet who must correct his servant king David.

The Prophet Corrected By God

2 Samuel 7:4–7 ESV
But that same night the word of the Lord came to Nathan, “Go and tell my servant David, ‘Thus says the Lord: Would you build me a house to dwell in? I have not lived in a house since the day I brought up the people of Israel from Egypt to this day, but I have been moving about in a tent for my dwelling. In all places where I have moved with all the people of Israel, did I speak a word with any of the judges of Israel, whom I commanded to shepherd my people Israel, saying, “Why have you not built me a house of cedar?” ’
2 Samuel 7:
Our mind are far to finite to and too corrupt to even lift a rock for God and properly place it where it might please Him. For in every step of the way we seem not to be able to help to consult ourselves and forget to consider God. Even in considering God, we don’t consider God.
David had been brought from the shepherd fields to be king of God’s people by God. He had been preserved through Goliath and through Saul and numerous battle by God. He had been chosen for His position by God. All of the favor and peace that he now enjoys, His palace of comfort has been established by God and then he looks out and says I will build a house for God.
We hear all of this as fitting and noble, just as the prophet Nathan did, that is until we hear the words of God,
“Would you build me a house to dwell in?”
“I have not lived in a house since the day I brought up the people of Israel from Egypt to this day.”
“I have been moving about in a tent for my dwelling.”
“In all of this time, to all of my people, to all of the judges who were commanded by me to shephered my people, did I ever ask any ‘why have you not built me a house of cedar?”’

DETAILS WORTH NOTING:

Let me point out a few details to help us see what is taking place here.
First: In verses 1,2 & 3 David is refered to as king. But when God refers to David, He calls him My servant David. (v.5)
David’s title as king had perhaps begun to go a little to much to his head. Though for the people in Israel and surrounding areas he was the highest authority in the land, in relation to God, David is merely a servant. David takes what appears to be the serving postion here of wanting to give God a helping hand. David is in a temple, God is in a tent…here God let me help you with that.
Second: David seems to put too much value in a temple, as apposed to the teabernacle. This is adressed by Stephen in .
Acts 7:44–50 ESV
“Our fathers had the tent of witness in the wilderness, just as he who spoke to Moses directed him to make it, according to the pattern that he had seen. Our fathers in turn brought it in with Joshua when they dispossessed the nations that God drove out before our fathers. So it was until the days of David, who found favor in the sight of God and asked to find a dwelling place for the God of Jacob. But it was Solomon who built a house for him. Yet the Most High does not dwell in houses made by hands, as the prophet says, “ ‘Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool. What kind of house will you build for me, says the Lord, or what is the place of my rest? Did not my hand make all these things?’
Stephen had been brought before the Sanhedrin on trumped up charges, and one was that he spoke against the temple (). Stephen did not deny the charge brought against him by a false witness. Instead, he used the law (the Old Testament Word of God) to defend himself. He pointed out that God was not nearly as impressed with the temple as the Jews were. His argument was that God gave Israel the tabernacle, and that the temple was David’s idea. Then in his closing argument, he noted that the God who created all things surely cannot be confined to a dwelling made by human hands. In short, God does not need a temple, and He did not ask for one. God rather allowed David’s son to build the temple because David wanted it. It wasn’t wrong, it just wasn’t God’s idea so to speak or rather did not make a difference in God’s plan. So God did not need a temple, as for some, a temple conveys the wrong message.
is in agreement with Stephens argument.
In we see as God gets to the heart of the matter.
Notice the pronoun “I”. This section of God getting to the heart of the matter is very clearly God-centered.
Peterson states,
The message that Nathan delivers to David is dominated by a recital of what God has done, is doing, and will do. God is the first-person subject of twenty-three verbs in this message, and these verbs carry the action. David, full of what he's going to do for God, is now subjected to a comprehensive rehearsal of what God has done, is doing, and will do for and in David. What looked yesterday like a bold Davidic enterprise on behalf of God now looks picayune.
Would David build God a home? History reminds David (and us) that it has always been God helping us, not us helping God. When God comes to reside in us, it is not that He needs a place to dwell but that we need His dwelling.

From Past To Future

When we get to verse 10, there is a significant change in the tense of verbs. The previous verbs have all been in the past tense showing what God has done. When we get to verse 10 however the verbs become future.
Here is what happens, God reminds David of all the great things that He has done and then shifts to future tense as if to say, “as great as all of that was, David, my servant, you haven’t seen anything yet!”
From here God promises:
To appoint a place for his people where they will be planted. A place for their own (as David intended to give God a “place of His own”), where they will dwell in peace and wickedness will no longer afflict them.

The House God Will Build for David & the Davidic Covenant

Next God tells David that He will build a house for him.
2 Samuel 7:11b–17 ESV
from the time that I appointed judges over my people Israel. And I will give you rest from all your enemies. Moreover, the Lord declares to you that the Lord will make you a house. When your days are fulfilled and you lie down with your fathers, I will raise up your offspring after you, who shall come from your body, and I will establish his kingdom. He shall build a house for my name, and I will establish the throne of his kingdom forever. I will be to him a father, and he shall be to me a son. When he commits iniquity, I will discipline him with the rod of men, with the stripes of the sons of men, but my steadfast love will not depart from him, as I took it from Saul, whom I put away from before you. And your house and your kingdom shall be made sure forever before me. Your throne shall be established forever.’ ” In accordance with all these words, and in accordance with all this vision, Nathan spoke to David.
2 Samuel
David had intended to build God a house (temple) yet God gently rebukes David and corrects him that he might take the proper posture before God. The God who has been behind all of David’s successes has even greater glory planned for David. David will not build God a temple, but God will permit his son to. And God will also build a house for David. The details of this house are then laid out in verse 12-17.

The Prophesy

Like much of prophesy this has a near and distant fulfillment. The near fulfillment is Solomon, David’s second son by Bathsheba. Solomon will take David’s place after his death and rule Israel. We know that Nathan’s words refer to Solomon because they include the fact that David’s son will sin and that God will correct him. As such this portion could not refer to the Messiah.
Unlike Saul, whose dynasty was taken away, David’s “house” (his descendants) will be a dynasty, and will reign over Israel. The decendants of David — his house — will enjoy a special Father/son typ relationship.
In the Bible the term “son” can mean more than just being a physical offspring. The term “son” sometimes means one who rules in place of another (the father). Adam was the “son of God” in the sense that he ruled over God’s creation as His agent ().
In this sense, one does not become a “son” at one’s birth; a king becomes a “son” of God when God installs him upon the throne:
Psalm 2:4–9 ESV
He who sits in the heavens laughs; the Lord holds them in derision. Then he will speak to them in his wrath, and terrify them in his fury, saying, “As for me, I have set my King on Zion, my holy hill.” I will tell of the decree: The Lord said to me, “You are my Son; today I have begotten you. Ask of me, and I will make the nations your heritage, and the ends of the earth your possession. You shall break them with a rod of iron and dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.”
This is what God announces to our Lord Jesus Christ. God calls our Lord His “Son” at His baptism (; ; ) at His transfiguration (; ; ). Various other places make mention of this, and uses these words as proof that Jesus was the promised Jewish Messiah. (, ; ; -Psalm 2)
The word “son” or “sons” is also used of those who have come to faith in Jesus Christ. When we are saved by faith we become the “sons” of God. This term not only means that we are a child of God, but that we become those who will reign with Him. Just as David was raised by God into royalty, so are we.
Romans 8:18–23 ESV
For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us. For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the sons of God. For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of him who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to corruption and obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God. For we know that the whole creation has been groaning together in the pains of childbirth until now. And not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies.

What’s The Big Idea?

When Christ returns to this earth and we are raised from the dead, we are adopted as sons in Christ, and we shall reign with Him for all eternity.
David will have sons, and these sons will become “sons” of God in that they will rule over Israel. But there will come one very special “son” and through Him all of the promises that God has made here and elswhere (pertaining to the Kingdom of God) will be fulfilled, either in His first coming, or in His second. It is in this “Son” that all of David’s hopes, all of Israels hopes, all of our hopes are fulfilled. This is the essense of the Davidic covenant.
God will give David sons who rule in his place, but God’s promises will be fully fulfilled in that special “Son” who is yet to come.

David’s Response & Our Response

2 Samuel 7:18–29 ESV
Then King David went in and sat before the Lord and said, “Who am I, O Lord God, and what is my house, that you have brought me thus far? And yet this was a small thing in your eyes, O Lord God. You have spoken also of your servant’s house for a great while to come, and this is instruction for mankind, O Lord God! And what more can David say to you? For you know your servant, O Lord God! Because of your promise, and according to your own heart, you have brought about all this greatness, to make your servant know it. Therefore you are great, O Lord God. For there is none like you, and there is no God besides you, according to all that we have heard with our ears. And who is like your people Israel, the one nation on earth whom God went to redeem to be his people, making himself a name and doing for them great and awesome things by driving out before your people, whom you redeemed for yourself from Egypt, a nation and its gods? And you established for yourself your people Israel to be your people forever. And you, O Lord, became their God. And now, O Lord God, confirm forever the word that you have spoken concerning your servant and concerning his house, and do as you have spoken. And your name will be magnified forever, saying, ‘The Lord of hosts is God over Israel,’ and the house of your servant David will be established before you. For you, O Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, have made this revelation to your servant, saying, ‘I will build you a house.’ Therefore your servant has found courage to pray this prayer to you. And now, O Lord God, you are God, and your words are true, and you have promised this good thing to your servant. Now therefore may it please you to bless the house of your servant, so that it may continue forever before you. For you, O Lord God, have spoken, and with your blessing shall the house of your servant be blessed forever.”
Observation 1: Notice where the emphasis of this chapter is placed.
2 verses are devoted to David’s expressed desire to build a house for God (v1,2)
One verse is devoted to Nathan’s hasty response (v3)
14 verses record Nathan’s vision and his communication of the revelation to David.
The last 12 verses records David’s response to this revelation. Davids house is finally in order in the sense that he sees things from God’s view point.
These concluding verses are David’s response to the Davidic covenant and they provide us with our pattern of worship/service as well.

Humility Regained - Joy Found

Instead of finding the word “king” three times in verses 18-21, we find the word “servant.”
We no longer hear of what David will do for God, but rather hear David cry “Who am I?” in response to what God is doing for Him.
The call to ministry and service is not a call to what you will do for God, it is rather a response of worship and love to what God has done and is doing for you. When we confuse these two, then we replace humility with arrogance, worship with idolatry, love with obligation, and grace with works.
In short we pervert the gospel and paint a false picture of who God is and who we are in Him.
When the church gathers to put together ministry reports of what she is doing for God, when she puts together all of the wonderful things that are happening in her midst as commercial for community good-will, and when she becomes driven by the testimony of her charity to another, then she is stuck in verse 1&2 of 2 Samuel. The church in all her charitable splender becomes a noisy gong who has forgotten her first love. With the best of intentions, she lay in need of rebuke that true rejoicing might be returned to her.
Statistics of what you and I have done are but fools gold and marketing ploys. They manipulate the emotion and mind to think that you are actually doing something both independent of and for God. Though J.F.K.’s words,
“Ask not what your country can do for you, but ask what you can do for your country”
don’t translate well into the church and how one serves God.
Rather than asking what we can do for God, we must observe what He has done for us, and believe upon what He is doing for us. In this we take note that we haven’t seen anything yet and in this we take great delight that we are even but the smallest part.
Romans 12:1–2 ESV
I appeal to you therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship. Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.
It is the according to the mercies of God that we live and by the power of God that we are transformed. Recognition of this good and perfect will of God is where true service begins, for it is where we actually think of ourselves as servants, and can be proud of the high calling as servants of the King.
Now, and always let us not be consumed with what we are doing for God (and as such moved to anxiety and discontentment), rather let us take this time to observe what God has done for us and in that let our eyes be fixed upon the Kingdom that He is establishing for His glory. Let us rest from our labor and celebrate the God who builds His house forever!
Matthew 16:18 ESV
And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.
Matthew 16:14–18 ESV
And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, others say Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter replied, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.
Matthew 16:16–18 ESV
Simon Peter replied, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.
Matthew 16:16–18 ESV
Simon Peter replied, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.
Matthew 16:14-
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