Faithlife Sermons

12 Marks of a Man of God Part 1 (Lesson 2)

Cut it Straight  •  Sermon  •  Submitted
0 ratings
· 6 views
Notes & Transcripts | Handout
Sermon Tone Analysis
A
D
F
J
S
Emotion
A
C
T
Language
O
C
E
A
E
Social
View more →

The Marks of the Man of God (Part 1)

1 Timothy 4:6–11 ESV
If you put these things before the brothers, you will be a good servant of Christ Jesus, being trained in the words of the faith and of the good doctrine that you have followed. Have nothing to do with irreverent, silly myths. Rather train yourself for godliness; for while bodily training is of some value, godliness is of value in every way, as it holds promise for the present life and also for the life to come. The saying is trustworthy and deserving of full acceptance. For to this end we toil and strive, because we have our hope set on the living God, who is the Savior of all people, especially of those who believe. Command and teach these things.
1 Timothy 4:16 ESV
Keep a close watch on yourself and on the teaching. Persist in this, for by so doing you will save both yourself and your hearers.
1 Timothy

Introduction

What does it look like to be a man of God? What are the qualifying marks of the excellent minister? Paul when to great lengths to point Timothy in the right direction of becoming an excellent minister of the gospel. Each of us should pursue excellence in our ministry.
What does it look like to be a man of God? What are the qualifying marks of the excellent minister? Paul when to great lengths to point Timothy in the right direction of becoming an excellent minister of the gospel. Each of us should pursue excellence in our ministry.

In Paul gives 12 marks of a man of God.

A watchman (4:6a)
A good servant (4:6b)
A student of Scripture (4:6c)
Avoids false doctrine (4:7a)
Disciplines himself for godliness (4:7b-9)
A hard worker (4:10)
Teaches with authority (4:11)
An example of spiritual maturity (4:12)
A biblical ministry (4:13)
Doesn’t neglect his calling (4:14)
Consumed with his calling (4:15a)
Progressing in spiritual growth (4:15b)

A Watchman (4:6a)

To understand the context of , we must go back and read the previous section. In 4:1-5 Paul warns Timothy that in the last days many would depart from the faith. False teachers and teaching was spreading throughout the Ephesus church, and here we see some of the consequences of such teaching (4:1-5). Paul considers this type of false teaching to be “doctrines of devils” (KJV) and “teachings of demons” (ESV).
The man of God is to “put these things before the brothers” (4:6a). The NASB says “in pointing these things to the brethren.” The man of God is to point these things out. He is not to be negative, but he is to give warning to the false teaching which may spread with the church. A watchman is one who stands on the tower and watches for trouble. The man of God is to be discerning of error and “point these things out.” We must put them before our hearers. We are not to give all of our time and attention to negative things, but if we will give our people the truth, and that in love, they will be able to discern error on their own as well. Believers are not to be children tossed to and fro with every wind of doctrine (). It is up to the man of the God to biblically warn and point out error.
The man of God must develop strong theological convictions. You must study hard truths, and develop the method of conveying those truths in a clear simplistic style. The man of God must continually warn his flock of error and show them truth.

A Good Servant (4:6b)

By warning and being a watchman, the man of God is considered to be a “good servant.” The word “good” in the Greek “Kalos” can be translated “noble,” “admirable,” or “excellent.” It takes a noble man to do a noble work.
Servant (Diakonos) is not here used in the technical sense of the office of deacon, or elder, but in its more general usage (; ; ) of anyone who serves in any ministry on Christ’s behalf.
1 Timothy: The MacArthur New Testament Commentary An Excellent Minister Is, Above All,a Servant

Diakonos (servant) is not here used in the technical sense of the office of deacon, but in its more general usage (cf.. 1 Cor. 4:1–2; 2 Cor. 3:6; 6:4) of anyone who serves in any ministry on Christ’s behalf.

Diakonos may be contrasted with another word frequently used to describe those who serve Christ, doulos. The latter word, often translated “slave,” has the idea of submission and subjection. Diakonos has the idea of “serviceability,” or “usefulness.” Those who serve Christ are called to excellence in their usefulness to His cause.
The way to defeat false doctrine is not only denouncing and refuting it, but also by positively teaching and living out the truth. By being an excellent servant of Jesus Christ, Timothy could deliver those who under the bondage of heresy and erroneous teaching.

A Student of Scripture (4:6c)

Weak preaching leads to weak churches. Faithfully warning God’s people must be rooted in faithful study of God’s Word. A lack of biblical knowledge only leads others to more biblical illiteracy in the pew. However, we mustn’t just study to preach, but we must study for the nourishment of our own souls.
Paul says, “being trained in the words of the faith and of the good doctrine that you have followed.” The KJV says “nourished up” and the NASB says “constantly nourished on.” The continual experience of being nourished on the truths of the Bible is essential. The excellent minister must read, study, and meditate on the Word of God. We must try our very best to cut it straight. We must pursue mastering the contents of the Bible. On the other side of that, we must allow the Bible to master us.
The man of God must be nourished, and immersed in the words of the faith, the entire body of Christian truth found in Scripture. The man of God must know all of it, from Genesis to Revelation.
The man of God must be nourished and immersed in good or sound doctrine. You need to study theology. Study creationism, the origin of sin, the history of redemption, ecclesiology (the study of the church), eschatology (the study of Christ’s second coming and end times). Study the Oneness of the Godhead, baptism in Jesus Name, the infilling of the Holy Spirit. Be well rounded in your studies. Don’t just focus on one doctrine, but be nourished and immersed in sound doctrine.

Avoids False Doctrine (4:7a)

Paul says to not “have anything to do with irreverent, silly myths” (4:7a). Have nothing to do with profane and and silly wives fables.
“Have nothing to do with” in the Greek is strong word, meaning reject or put away. Paul contrasts being nourished on sound doctrine with putting away or rejecting false doctrine. The ESV says “irreverent,” the NASB says “worldly” fables. The original word describes that which is radically separate from what is truthful and holy. Anything that contradicts Scripture is irreverent and worldly. They are fables, they are fictitious and mythical. The KJV says "profane and old wives’ fables.” Paul sarcastically denounces false doctrine as something like a fairy tale taught by elderly women to children.
There is no place for foolish teachings in the church. The man of God must not involve himself or the church with silly, irreverent myths and fables. We must not forget that the first bookend of this section Paul called it “doctrines of devils.”
Have your mind and heart saturated with Scripture. Be a voracious reader of Scripture. Feed your soul and spirit upon the Word of God. Don’t fill your mind with conspiracy theories on YouTube and Facebook.
1 Timothy: The MacArthur New Testament Commentary An Excellent Minister Is, Above All,a Servant

Diakonos (servant) is not here used in the technical sense of the office of deacon, but in its more general usage (cf.. 1 Cor. 4:1–2; 2 Cor. 3:6; 6:4) of anyone who serves in any ministry on Christ’s behalf.

Related Media
Related Sermons