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Don't Murder, Don't even Think about it!

10 Commandments  •  Sermon  •  Submitted   •  Presented
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Exodus 20:13 & Matthew 5:21-26
INTRO:
AG: There is a famous quote about the Bible that says: “It’s not the parts of the Bible I do not understand that worry me, it’s the parts I do understand but do not want to do.”
TS: Jesus set a pattern in Sermon on the mount as He restates some of these commands. He will say, “You have heard it said... but I say to you”
As we enter the next few commands, we will see Jesus not only restate but give new emphasis to the commands
RS: He said some things which may possibly be hard to hear.
But the reality is that they are hard to hear not because they are hard to understand, but because many of them are simply hard to obey.
They require putting away of the flesh and total dependence upon the spirit.
Exodus 20:13 NKJV
“You shall not murder.
Matthew 5:21–26 NKJV
“You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘

I. Limited view of the Law - Do Not Commit Murder

Matthew 5:21 NKJV
“You have heard that it was said to those of old, ‘
The OT Moral Law of God forbids murder.
Everyone knows murder is bad.
But the Bible tells us that there is more to murder than just the injury it causes the victim.
God has specifically pointed out murder as a heinous sin because of the nature of human life.
There is a sanctity of human life which is different than all other life in the world.
Notice the command given to Noah when he came down out of the ark.
Genesis 9:6 NKJV
“Whoever sheds man’s blood,
We bear the Image of God!
Of all creatures made by God, man alone was unique
God breathed into Adam the breath of life
God says that only man was made in His image
this is true of no other animal!
To murder someone is a direct affront to the God who Created him of her.
We are seeing a generation raised up which has no understanding of the sanctity of life.
Millions of babies have been murdered in the womb for the sake of convenience, and I believe such a holocaust surely has brought judgment upon our nation.
Murder carried stiff penalties:
Genesis 9:6 NKJV
“Whoever sheds man’s blood,
Why? Because he has sinned against that person and also the Creator of that person, in whose image he/she was made.
Murder sinful and an affront to our Creator.
The Pharisees could proudly declare, I have never murdered! Behold my righteousness!
Many in our times would say the same.
However, there is a spirit within this law that affects not only murder, but our attitude towards one another as well....

II. The New Emphasis of the Law: Anger And and Hatred are the Root of Murder

Matthew 5:22 NKJV
But I say to you that whoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment. And whoever says to his brother, ‘Raca!’ shall be in danger of the council. But whoever says, ‘You fool!’ shall be in danger of hell fire.
The word Raca is sometimes translated as “insults”
HCSB Matthew 5:22
22 But I tell you, everyone who is angry with his brother will be subject to judgment. And whoever says to his brother, ‘Fool!’ will be subject to the Sanhedrin. But whoever says, ‘You moron!’ will be subject to hellfire.
The word “Raca” is the Aramaic word which is used here by Christ.
It means to call someone “empty headed” or “stupid”.
RC Sproul makes the point that “Raca” and “Fool” actually work together in this passage to make a point.
To call a man “Raca” is to imply he has an intellectual deficiency (they are stupid).
But to call a man “Fool” is to imply that he has a moral deficiency (they lack wisdom to do right). Remember, it is the “fool” who has said in his heart there is no God (Psalm 14:1; 53:1).
Both of these words are words of insult and derision.
They are hate-filled words intended to hurt an individual.
Jesus isn’t saying that anger and insults are the exact same as murder.
While they are both are worthy of judgment that He isn’t saying they are functionally the same.
Anger and hatred are the root of murder
They are the motivator, behind the action of taking a life.
Jesus is saying they are both worthy of Judgment and not to feel boastful though you haven’t murdered anyone as you insult and hate others.
There was much emphasis on keeping the letter but not the spirit of the law
It may not be taking person’s life, but our hateful words which spew from angered hearts still sinful because they are attacks upon a person who bears the image of God.
NOTICE TOO: The ‘Without Cause’ Clause. There is a very important textual issue which arises here at verse 22.
QUOTE: B. Schwertely “Obviously, not all anger can be labeled as sinful because God Himself has anger, indignation and wrath toward the devil, his angels and all unrepentant sinners. Our Lord became so angry he drove the money changers and all those who bought and sold animals out of the temple complex by overturning their tables and swinging a “whip of cords”
The danger in anger is not that there are things which should cause us to be angry in this world - there certainly are.
The problem is that we often become angry with the wrong things, and allow ourselves to be governed by the emotion of anger rather than love for God and love for our neighbor.
Christ’s point here is that it is not enough just to say, “Well at least I didn’t kill the guy!”
If we hold hatred and animosity and spite toward another person, we are in sin.
If we allow our tongues to stab them with words of hatred, we are in sin.

The Application of the Law - Seek Peace with Others

Matthew 5:23–25 NKJV
Therefore if you bring your gift to the altar, and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar, and go your way. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift. Agree with your adversary quickly, while you are on the way with him, lest your adversary deliver you to the judge, the judge hand you over to the officer, and you be thrown into prison.
We are to seek to live at peace with others.
Our walk is not supposed to be marked with strife and turmoil and drama.
This requires that we do two things:
Working to reconcile with those who are at odds with us.
Matthew 5:23–24 NKJV
Therefore if you bring your gift to the altar, and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gift there before the altar, and go your way. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift.
Notice that the responsibility is placed upon us.
It says if someone has a problem with us, we should go to them.
He even indicates that not doing so should interrupt our worship.
When we come into the church, and we know there are people in the world who are angry with us, and yet we have not reached out to them for reconciliation, then we need to do that first.
Romans 12:18 NKJV
If it is possible, as much as depends on you, live peaceably with all men.
Not letting situations get out of hand
Matthew 5:25–26 NKJV
Agree with your adversary quickly, while you are on the way with him, lest your adversary deliver you to the judge, the judge hand you over to the officer, and you be thrown into prison. Assuredly, I say to you, you will by no means get out of there till you have paid the last penny.
Jesus is making a point that there is a natural progression to conflict.
It starts out slow, but escalates fast.
Have you ever been in a situation, and asked yourself, “How did we get here?” and “How did this get so BAD so FAST?”
Jesus is saying that we need to preempt situations before they get out of hand.
If someone is going to accuse you before a court, go and reconcile with them quickly, so that the situation does not erupt into a series of negative events --- which end finally with a problem so big it is seemingly insurmountable.
We understand how this applies to us...
If someone is upset with us, a series of unfortunate events can happen as a result.
Most of us are familiar with this, because we have experienced it.
And often we ask ourselves: Why didn’t I just go to this person before all this started, and try to work this out?
Our responsibility, as believers, is to not allow our own anger to keep us from seeking reconciliation as we ought.
Our goal should always be reconciliation.
Unfortunately, it seems that some folks love to live in drama.
Their lives are lived in constant and perpetual frustration because they are always upset with someone about something.
They seem to stay angry all the time.
Beloved, this is no way for the Christ-follower to live.

CONCLUSION:

Instead of murder anger and hatred, we should be governed by a desire for reconciliation.
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