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2 Chronicles

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2 Chronicles 

We have seen that 1 Chronicles was actually all about David and it began with those long genealogies. Why David? Because David leads to Christ, and the New Testament opens with: “The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David …” (Matt. 1:1). That is the reason it is given.

In the Books of Samuel and the Books of Kings we were given man’s viewpoint. This does not mean that those books were not inspired. They are inspired. But He gives first the human viewpoint, then the divine viewpoint. And the emphasis is on David. Where did David put the emphasis? He put it on the building of the temple of God.

In 2 Chronicles we will find two major themes.

   The first is Solomon’s construction of the temple. Is that important? God must have thought it was    

          important because He inspired the writer to devote six chapters to it.

   The second theme is revival. This book covers chronologically the same period as Kings but gives certain  

    noteable emphases on, Judah, the Southern Kingdom. Since we are looking at the same story as were

    in Kings and there were no good kings in the northern kingdom, the emphasis in this book is on the

    southern kingdom, Judah, and on David’s line. That was a pretty bad lot, too. However, there were   

   five of those kings who were outstanding: Asa, Jehoshaphat, Joash, Hezekiah, Josiah. These five kings

   were the means of bringing revival, renewal, and reformation to the nation.

"The book concludes with the decree of Cyrus after the seventy years of captivity." No record is given of the period of the captivity. That was “time out” in God’s program. Remember that this is the record from God’s point of view.

 McGee, J. Vernon

Questions for 2 Chronicles

Q. 1. When God offered to give Solomon the desires of his heart, what did Solomon asked for? Vs. 1:7-10

Q. 2. What was God’s answer? Vs. 1:11-12

Q. 3. According to the King of Tyre (2:11-12) and to the Queen of Sheba (9:1-6, 23), did God answer        Solomon’s prayer request for wisdom?

Q. 4 In 2 Chronicles 2:5-7, 7:12, what was in Solomon’s mind as to why he built temple?

Q. 5. Everyone knows that God is a God of love but according to 2 Chronicles 7:14-22, would you say that God is also a God of judgments? Can you find places in latter chapters of this book where God did what He promised?

Q. 6.  2 Chronicles 7:3 Is God good? 

Q. 8. 2 Chronicles 10:8, what was Rehoboam first mistake in his kingdom?  What were the results?

Q. 9. 2 Chronicles 29:2 ff what did Hezekiah do that was right before the Lord? What were the results?

Q.10. 2 Chronicles 34:15 what was lost in the house of the Lord? Vs. 34: 18-19  What were the results of hearing the Words of the Law? Vs. 20-35:19 what was the results of obeying the Book of the Law?

INTRODUCTION*

We have seen at the conclusion of 1 Chronicles that David had assembled all the material for the temple, had arranged for the manpower, had given encouragement to the leaders of the nation Israel and to the people, organized the service of the temple, provided all the money, and told Solomon to get busy. Now in 2 Chronicles Solomon is going to get busy.

We have seen that 1 Chronicles was actually all about David. It began with those long genealogies. There was a lot of begetting from Adam right on down to David. Why was the genealogy given? Because it led to David. Why David? Because David leads to Christ, and the New Testament opens with: “The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David …” (Matt. 1:1). That is the reason it is given.

I will mention again that in the Books of Chronicles we are getting God’s viewpoint. In the Books of Samuel and the Books of Kings we were given man’s viewpoint. This does not mean that those books were not inspired. They are inspired. But He gives first the human viewpoint, then the divine viewpoint. And the emphasis is on David. Where did David put the emphasis? He put it on the building of the temple of God.

In 2 Chronicles we will find two major themes.

The first is the building of the temple.

The second theme is revival. This book covers chronologically the same period as Kings but gives certain notable emphases.

The first nine chapters are given over to the reign of Solomon. Six of those chapters are concerning the building of the temple. It is pretty evident where God is putting the emphasis. The building of the temple was Solomon’s greatest accomplishment. People always think of Solomon in regard to all the wives that he had. That is quite spectacular—no question about it—but it is not where God puts the emphasis.

His having many wives wasn’t in the will of God. That was contrary to the will of God, and that was a factor which brought about the division of the kingdom. Don’t tell me he got by with it. He didn’t. Sin always brings judgment. It doesn’t matter who it is that commits the sin, it will bring judgment. The only way that anyone can get to heaven is to have a Savior, and that Savior is Jesus Christ.

So the first major theme of 2 Chronicles is Solomon’s construction of the temple. That is important. God thought it was important and inspired the writer to devote six chapters to it.

From chapter 10 to the end of the book the kingdom is divided. We have seen from the Books of Kings that after the kingdom was divided there were many kings who ruled and that most of those kings were not very attractive.

We have made the statement that there was not a single good king in Israel, the northern kingdom. So we find in Chronicles that there is no emphasis on the kingdom of Israel at all. The emphasis in this book is on the southern kingdom, Judah, and on David’s line. That was a pretty bad lot, too. However, there were five of those kings who were outstanding: Asa, Jehoshaphat, Joash, Hezekiah, Josiah. These five kings were the means of bringing revival back to the nation.

The spotlight of this book is on the kings who followed in the line of David. Special prominence is given to the five kings in whose reigns were periods of revival, renewal, and reformation. "The book concludes with the decree of Cyrus after the seventy years of captivity." No record is given of the period of the captivity. That was “time out” in God’s program. Remember that this is the record from God’s point of view.

OUTLINE

     I.     Solomon’s Reign, Chapters 1–9

     II.     Division of the Kingdom and History of Judah, Chapters 10–36
Reformations Given Prominence:

A.     Asa’s, Chapters 14–16

B.     Jehoshaphat’s, Chapters 17–20

C.     Joash’s, Chapters 23–24

D.     Hezekiah’s, Chapters 29–32

E.     Josiah’s, Chapters 34–35

CHAPTER 1

Theme: Solomon becomes king and prays for wisdom

McGee, J. Vernon

text with italics and bold and John 3:16 and v. 20.

Heading 2

Text with an outline.

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