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"The Book of the Wars of the LORD" (Numbers 21:14-15)

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Question

Numbers 21:14-15 mentions the “Book of the Wars of the LORD.”
Numbers 21:14–15 NIV
14 That is why the Book of the Wars of the Lord says: “… Zahab in Suphah and the ravines, the Arnon 15 and the slopes of the ravines that lead to the settlement of Ar and lie along the border of Moab.”
Is this a book in heaven?
There are books mentioned in Scripture that appear to have a heavenly origin or location.
“God’s Book” [=“Book of Life”?](Exodus 32:32-33)
“The Book of Truth” (Daniel 10:21)
“The Book of Life” (Psalm 69:28; Philippians 4:3; Revelation 3:5; 13:8; 17:8; 20:12, 15; 21:27)
The scroll in the right hand of God that Jesus, the Lamb takes and breaks the seals (Revelation 5)
Other books at the final judgment (Revelation 20:12)
But this “Book of the Wars of the LORD” does not appear to be a heavenly book.
Is it another Jewish writing that didn’t get included in the Bible?
Yes. This is most likely a Jewish writing that is not included in the Bible.
Some believe it is a collection of poems or songs about battles fought in the name of the LORD.
Based on the quote in Num 21:14–15, it appears that, if The Chronicle of the Wars of Yahweh was a substantial work, it likely took the form of a chronicle or annals describing various battles fought in the name of Yahweh, either in list or narrative form. Unfortunately, this source is no longer extant. [Jason A. Riley, “Book of the Wars of the Lord,” ed. John D. Barry et al., The Lexham Bible Dictionary (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2016).]
The author of Numbers then quotes from The Chronicle of the Wars of Yahweh, likely because it refers to Arnon and Moab, and also because it supports the geographic relationship between Arnon and Moab described in Num 21:13. [Jason A. Riley, “Book of the Wars of the Lord,” ed. John D. Barry et al., The Lexham Bible Dictionary (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2016).]
The Chronicle of the Wars of Yahweh is one of three nonextant sources quoted in Num 21. [Jason A. Riley, “Book of the Wars of the Lord,” ed. John D. Barry et al., The Lexham Bible Dictionary (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2016).]
Numbers 21 contains quotes from three nonextant sources:
The Chronicle of the Wars of Yahweh (Num 21:14–15)
An untitled song (Num 21:17–18)
A proverb regarding Heshbon (Num 21:27–30) [Jason A. Riley, “Book of the Wars of the Lord,” ed. John D. Barry et al., The Lexham Bible Dictionary (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2016).]
Is this (Numbers 21:14-15) the only place it’s mentioned in the Bible?
Yes. It is only mentioned here.
But there are numerous other references to extrabiblical literature in the Bible.
“Book of the Law” (Deuteronomy 28:61; 29:21; 30:10; 31:26; Joshua 1:8; 8:31; 23:6)
= Deuteronomy?
= The Pentateuch?
“Book of Jashar” (Joshua 10:13; 2 Samuel 1:18)
“Book of the Acts of Solomon” (1 Kings 11:41)
“Book of the Chronicles of the Kings of Israel” (1 Kings 14:19; 15:31; 16:5, 14, 20, 27; 22:39; 2 Kings 1:18; 10:34; 13:8, 12; 14:15, 28; 15:11, 15, 21, 26)
= “Book of the Kings of Israel”? (1 Chronicles 9:1)
“Book of the Chronicles of the Kings of Judah” (1 Kings 14:29; 15:7, 23; 22:45; 2 Kings 8:23; 12:19; 14:18; 15:6, 36; 16:19; 20:20; 21:17, 25; 23:28; 24:5)
“Book of the Kings of Judah and Israel” (2 Chronicles 16:11; 25:26; 27:7; 28:26; 35:27; 36:8)
“Chronicles of Jehu the son of Hanani” which are recorded in the “Book of the Kings of Israel" (2 Chronicles 20:34)
“The Annotations on the Book of the Kings” (2 Chronicles 24:27)
“The Vision of the Prophet Isaiah Son of Amoz” in the “Book of the Kings of Judah and Israel" (2 Chronicles 32:32; cf. Isaiah 36-39)
“Sayings of the Wise” in Proverbs
“Testament of Moses” (Jude 9) (1st century A.D.)
Jude 9 NIV
9 But even the archangel Michael, when he was disputing with the devil about the body of Moses, did not himself dare to condemn him for slander but said, “The Lord rebuke you!”
“The First Book of Enoch” (Jude 14-15) (1st century B.C.)
Jude 14–15 NIV
14 Enoch, the seventh from Adam, prophesied about them: “See, the Lord is coming with thousands upon thousands of his holy ones 15 to judge everyone, and to convict all of them of all the ungodly acts they have committed in their ungodliness, and of all the defiant words ungodly sinners have spoken against him.”

How should we understand the use of extrabiblical material and the doctrine of inspiration?

2 Timothy 3:16–17 NIV
16 All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, 17 so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.
2 Peter 1:21 NIV
21 For prophecy never had its origin in the human will, but prophets, though human, spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit.
Rightly understood, inspiration and the use of sources are completely compatible.
Luke 1:1–4 NIV
1 Many have undertaken to draw up an account of the things that have been fulfilled among us, 2 just as they were handed down to us by those who from the first were eyewitnesses and servants of the word. 3 With this in mind, since I myself have carefully investigated everything from the beginning, I too decided to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theophilus, 4 so that you may know the certainty of the things you have been taught.
The use of a nonbiblical source does not necessarily endorse the entire writing as inerrant and authoritative.
The portion that the biblical authors use can be regarded as trustworthy because of the superintending work of the Holy Spirit in inspiration.
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