Faithlife Sermons

Sermon Tone Analysis

Overall tone of the sermon

This automated analysis scores the text on the likely presence of emotional, language, and social tones. There are no right or wrong scores; this is just an indication of tones readers or listeners may pick up from the text.
A score of 0.5 or higher indicates the tone is likely present.
Emotion Tone
Anger
0.08UNLIKELY
Disgust
0.07UNLIKELY
Fear
0.07UNLIKELY
Joy
0.63LIKELY
Sadness
0.57LIKELY
Language Tone
Analytical
0.51LIKELY
Confident
0UNLIKELY
Tentative
0.27UNLIKELY
Social Tone
Openness
0.89LIKELY
Conscientiousness
0.85LIKELY
Extraversion
0.44UNLIKELY
Agreeableness
0.83LIKELY
Emotional Range
0.76LIKELY

Tone of specific sentences

Tones
Emotion
Anger
Disgust
Fear
Joy
Sadness
Language
Analytical
Confident
Tentative
Social Tendencies
Openness
Conscientiousness
Extraversion
Agreeableness
Emotional Range
Anger
< .5
.5 - .6
.6 - .7
.7 - .8
.8 - .9
> .9
No Greater Love
John 15:12–15 (ESV)
12 “This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.
13 Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.
14 You are my friends if you do what I command you.
15 No longer do I call you servants, for the servant does not know what his master is doing; but I have called you friends, for all that I have heard from my Father I have made known to you.
Paul Tripp Video Church is Messy
Introduction
Your best friend is suddenly cool and distant.
Your spouse can’t stop complaining about your bad habits.
Your son refuses to talk to you.
What are you supposed to do?
Relationships are messy.
Relationships are hurtful.
We’ve never been in a relationship that hasn’t disappointed us in some way.
God has created us for community – vertical community with God and horizontal community with each other.
We shouldn’t run away from the messiness of community.
We shouldn’t try to avoid imperfect people.
You have hundreds of relational interactions each day.
Now you can face your relationships with strength and courage because God is up to something.
He wants to change you.
Plans A, B, and C might be to shut down, lash out, or get out.
But consider Plan D:
Recognize that God has the last word on those messy, conflict-ridden relationships.
He can use them to make you into someone who can give and receive love—with God and others.
Impossible?
Idealistic?
Not really.
The great incarnate God of the universe, speaks of friendship in terms of our relationships to him.
He calls us friends, saying, “Greater love has no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.
You are my friends if you do what I command you.”
John 15:12–17 focuses on the friendship and love that is to exist among the branches of the vine, among believers.
Actually, all of chapter 15 is concerned with the believer’s relationships.
Verses 1–11 have to do with the relationship between the vine and the branches, between Christ and believers,
12–17 with the relationship of branch to branch, or believer to believer,
18–27 with the relationship of the vine and the branches to the world.
The principles in John 15:12–17 apply to everyone—to those who have friends and those who feel they do not, to the aggressive, the outgoing, the shy—because these principles govern both the initiation, the reception, and the maintenance of friendship.
And as friendship develops, these principles take us into deeper and deeper relationships.
Principles that Promote Friendship and Love Among the Branches
John 15:12–13 (ESV)
12 “This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.
13 Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.
Sacrifice is essential to genuine friendship and love.
Verses 12–13 are a restatement of the “new commandment” given back in John 13:34: “A new command I give you: Love one another.
As I have loved you, so you must love one another.”
The idea of sacrifice is found in the phrase, “as I have loved you,”
for Christ loved us so much that he gave his life for us.
The old commandment was to love God with everything in us, and our neighbor as ourselves.
The story of the good Samaritan was Christ’s great explanation of that kind of love, and it was a wonderful love.
This new commandment requires us to love as Jesus loved.
His sacrifice is our model.
Jesus calls for sacrificial love in his church.
Our Lord exemplified this even before the cross.
Just before he gave this new commandment, he tried in every way to restore Judas, though he knew Judas was bent on betraying him.
He seated Judas next to him, the place of honor.
He dipped a morsel and offered it to Judas, a custom offering friendship.
Christ was offering restoration.
In John 15:12–13 our Lord officially makes sacrifice an essential characteristic of love between believers, in imitation of his love for us.
Friendship thrives on sacrifice.
There is not enough of this in God’s family.
We must consciously cultivate a sacrificial spirit and must constantly work at being givers.[1]
Human Friendship
When Jesus says, “You are my friends,” it is evident that he is speaking to us on the human level in terms we can clearly understand.
And he is doing so—we cannot fail to see it—so that we might contrast his friendship, which is great and perfect, to even the best of the other friendships we have known.
The best known of the biblical examples is the friendship between Jonathan, the son of King Saul, and David, the young hero of Israel.
Mutuality of heart was also the basis of David and Jonathan’s relationship.
First Samuel records its dramatic beginning after David killed Goliath: “After David had finished speaking to Saul, Jonathan became one in spirit with David, and he loved him as himself” (18:1).
Their souls were knit together.
Jonathan was in line for the throne.
But David was so evidently blessed of God that the people were saying that he should be the next king.
Here was cause for great antagonism, antagonism between the apparent rights of the one and the supposed aspirations of the other.
But there was no antagonism.
Instead there was a great and beautiful friendship.
It was a case in which each sacrificed in order to put the other’s interests ahead of his own.
Sometimes the love that exists between one friend and another leads to the ultimate sacrifice, to death.
I read about a man who in a sublime moment of self-sacrifice gave his life to try to save his grandson.
The two were out in a boat on the Monongahela River in West Virginia, and neither of them could swim.
The child, for one reason or another, fell overboard and was drowning.
So the man jumped in after the child.
Both drowned.
But afterward when they found the bodies, the grandfather still had the young child clutched in his arms.
He had been so anxious to save his grandson that he had not even opened up his arms to attempt to swim to save himself.
When we hear a story like that we tend to become silent, for we know that we stand before something sublime.
(lofty, grand) It is the ultimate sacrifice, the sacrifice of one’s life.
Because of such sacrifices we understand what the Lord is saying when he declares in clear reference to his own self-sacrifice: “Greater love has no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.”[2]
The Principle of Mutuality in Friendship and Love
John 15:14–15 (ESV)
14 You are my friends if you do what I command you.
15 No longer do I call you servants, for the servant does not know what his master is doing; but I have called you friends, for all that I have heard from my Father I have made known to you.
You know even as Christians, when we talk about something like friendship with Jesus, when we speak about something that intimate, it’s absolutely thrilling to realize that
The Son of God, who is responsible for the creation and the upholding of the Universe, is literally a personal intimate friend of those who are his own.
It’s an overwhelming thing when you really grasp that truth, and this morning I trust that you’ll see it, perhaps, in a light that you’ve never seen it before.
What does it mean to really be a friend of Jesus Christ?
Jesus Christ is talking to his beloved disciples, eleven of them now, because Judas is perpetrating his deed of betrayal, so he’s gone.
These are the eleven remaining disciples, the abiding branches from the analogy in the last few verses that we’ve studied.
They are sad because they are awaiting the departure of Jesus, Their hearts are filled with sorrow.
They know he is going to leave them.
We see that in all of these words, Jesus is comforting them.
And this beautiful concept that they are to be his personal, intimate, beloved friends has to be one of the greatest comforts of all the things that he says to them.
I know how personally it affects me.[3]
< .5
.5 - .6
.6 - .7
.7 - .8
.8 - .9
> .9